Bertolt Brecht lives! Maggie Hadleigh-West walks crowded urban streets carrying a video camera and microphone, trailed by one or two women also with cameras. Whenever a man harasses her, ... See full summary »
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Maggie Hadleigh-West ...
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Bertolt Brecht lives! Maggie Hadleigh-West walks crowded urban streets carrying a video camera and microphone, trailed by one or two women also with cameras. Whenever a man harasses her, with ogling or words, she turns the camera on him, moves in close, and questions his behavior. The questions are not for dialogue but for making him as uncomfortable as he's made her. More than 50 such encounters are included: the men react with bravado, embarrassment, or anger. None apologize. Interspersed are her voice-over stories of growing up and dealing with men, as well as interviews with several women who talk about how they handle similar harassment and what they feel about it. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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sexism | independent film | See All (2) »

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Documentary

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12 August 1998 (USA)  »

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Featured in SexTV: Warzone/Richard Kern/Breastfeeding (1998) See more »

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Self-indulgent posturing over shadows a legitimate message.
31 October 2003 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

This film starts off with an interesting idea, challenging men on the streets who harass women, but it soon devolves into a series of Jerry Springer-like confrontations. Not much is analysed or discovered about anyone's behaviour. The film maker does get some shots in at the men she challenges but like another reviewer noted, many of them seem mentally handicapped or drug or alcohol addicted. That's not an excuse for their behaviour but putting them on the other side of a dialogue is not likely to produce anything really worth while.

This film is really a sort of power trip that may be long over due but in it's execution it is potentially embarassing to watch for both sexes. Not really a documentary and not a study, War Zone is at best a guilty pleasure. It produces the same sort of result that an Israeli might get from walking up to a Palestinian and shouting at him, and vice versa.


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