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The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg (1998)

The life and career of Hank Greenberg, the first major Jewish baseball star in the Major Leagues.

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12 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Reeve Brenner ...
Himself - interviewee (as Rabbi Reeve Brenner)
Hank Greenberg ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself - interviewee
...
Himself - interviewee (as Alan Dershowitz)
Carl Levin ...
Himself - interviewee (as Senator Carl Levin)
Stephen Greenberg ...
Himself - interviewee
Joseph Greenberg ...
Himself - interviewee (as Joe Greenberg)
Max Ticktin ...
Himself - interviewee (as Rabbi Max Ticktin)
Bill Mead ...
Himself - interviewee
...
Himself (archive footage)
Basil 'Mickey' Briggs ...
Himself - interviewee
Don Shapiro ...
Himself - interviewee
Bert Gordon ...
Himself - interviewee
Joe Falls ...
Himself - interviewee
...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

The story of Baseball Hall-of-Famer Hank Greenberg is told through archival film footage and interviews with Jewish and non-Jewish fans, his former teammates, his friends, and his family. As a great first baseman with the Detroit Tigers, Greenberg endured antisemitism and became a hero and source of inspiration throughout the Jewish community, not incidentally leading the Tigers to Major League dominance in the 1930s. Written by George S. Davis <mgeorges@prodigy.net>

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Taglines:

When America Needed Heroes, A Jewish Slugger Stepped To The Plate.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic elements and mild language
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Details

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Release Date:

21 July 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Жизнь и времена Хэнка Гринберга  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$14,371, 21 January 2000, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,703,901, 29 October 2000
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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(archive footage)|
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Dick Schaap: The first day that Hank was in the army, he and the other recruits were lined up and the sergeant immediately began spouting some anti-Semitic remarks like "I don't want no Goldbergs and no Cohns in my unit." Whereupon Hank raised his hand and says "My name is Greenberg." and he looks at Hank 6-3, 6-4, 200, 230, he says "I didn't say anything about Greenbergs."
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Connections

Features A Night at the Opera (1935) See more »

Soundtracks

Air Mail Special
Written by Benny Goodman, Jim Mundy (as Jimmie Mundy), and Charlie Christian
Performed by Benny Goodman and His Orchestra
Courtesy of Nichevo Records, Rytvoc Inc., and Rat Bag Music Publishing
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User Reviews

 
A Bigger-Than-Life Hero To Millions Of People
18 January 2008 | by See all my reviews

I've seen this promoted, most of the time, as a movie for Jewish people because it is about their first big baseball idol, Hank Greenberg. A lot of the material here deals with how big an idol Hank was to all the Jews in Amercia back then. I found that interesting, but I watched it simply because I love baseball, especially the "old days" and am thrilled to see footage of any Major League baseball games and stars from the first half of the 20th century. If there is a human-interest behind the diamond heroics, all the better! It's amazing the degree Greenberg was literally worshiped by the Jewish people make in the 1930s and 1940s.

Greenberg was a likable guy and I enjoyed seeing him talk here and there from an interview he did in the early '80s, talking about his career. He isn't a braggart, but he's not that modest, either. He knew he was very good. He didn't make excuses either when he didn't accomplish he wanted, like hitting 60 homers one season. Sadly, some of the commentators like attorney Alan Dershowitz are not so unbiased. His paranoia is more than evident, claiming they didn't want a Jewish man breaking Ruth's record so they wouldn't throw strikes to him. That's proved a lie in the next minute when they show Cleveland ace Bob Feller striking him out several times in a late-season game as Hank was stuck at 58 and never made it to 60. To his credit, Greenberg said those claims were false, anyway.

I enjoyed not only seeing Greenberg smash the ball but witnessing some of his famous and not-so-famous teammates in footage, too, and also interviewed in their older age - guys like Charlie Gehringer, a great second baseman on Hank's winning teams in Detroit.

Greenberg was one of a number of great baseball players who gave up years of his ballplayer prime to serve in the military during World war II, as it is pointed out here. He left at the age of 31 and came back at 35.....and wound up hitting a grand slam in the bottom of the ninth to enable the Tigers to win the pennant! It might have been his greatest hit. The Tigers went on to cap off the season with a World Series win over the Cubs

That's one reason (besides the recent steroids scandal) baseball records aren't as meaningful as people think. Guys like Greenberg and Boston's Ted Williams lost 4-5 years of their prime years in baseball. Who knows what their final totals would be had their been no war?

I liked what Greenberg said near the end of this long documentary, something I wish more athletes of today would say (and believe): "I"ve tried to pattern my life on the fact that I'm out there in the limelight, so to speak, and that there are a lot of kids out there. If I set a good example for them, maybe it will, in some way, affect their lives."

Amen to that.


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