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The King's Guard (2000)

PG-13 | | Adventure | 1 August 2000 (USA)
A princess falls in love with her father's swordsman.




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Credited cast:
Lord Morton
Queen Beatrice
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
David Beecroft ...
Sgt. Drummond
Gerald Patrick Cox ...
Kit Davlin ...
Ardon DeAvalon
Abba Elfman ...
Jason Faulske ...
Bandit / Swordsman
Delia Ford ...
Peasant Woman
Casie Fox ...
Katie McDear
Mark Gadbois ...
White Flag Bandit
Master Robert


A princess falls in love with her father's swordsman.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


What is romance and adventure without a little swordplay? See more »



Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:





Release Date:

1 August 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Custódia do Rei  »

Filming Locations:

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:


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Did You Know?


Although Eric Roberts received top billing for the movie, he first appears 25 minutes into the film and has less than 30 lines of dialogue. See more »


When the first guard in the blue outfit is killed, the killing thrust clearly goes between his arm and torso. See more »


Otto: You must keep these guns coming, we have many bad guys to stop.
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Crazy Credits

Watch out for the out-takes at the end of the video or DVD. See more »


You Are My Heart
Music & Lyrics by Ray Colcord
© 2000 Superscore Music
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User Reviews

A for effort, D for the result...
15 June 2002 | by See all my reviews

Hmmm, the cast first. Well, I am a big fan of red heads and Khrystyne Haje, who plays Roxanne, was the only reason I stuck with this sucker. She is as pretty now as she was back on the old American TV series "Head of the Class." The other female lead, Ashley Jones as the princess, was also a delight to watch, though no one would accuse her of being a great actress from watching this movie. Trevor St. John plays the captain assigned to guard the Princess and he acquits himself well enough. He reminds me a Cary Elwes, who was the lead in "The Princess Bride."

How in the world did Ron Perlman(from "Beauty and the Beast fame") and Eric Roberts get signed to this?? I suspect Mr. Roberts had some connection to the production beyond simply appearing in the film. The credits were revealing in that Roberts had his own driver, production assistant, costumer, and make-up artist, while the rest of the cast had to share a seperate team.

In fact, the blooper reel at the end was, in my opinion, also quite revealing in that almost all of the clips were of Roberts blowing lines. Almost none of the other cast were shown on the blooper real and I was left wondering whether Roberts was the only one unable to keep his lines straight or instead used his clout so that the rest of the cast just wasn't included. I wanted to see the three main female leads gaff it up a little but no luck.

The script took few chances, surrounding a paper-thin plot with all the standard fairy-fantasy tale cliches. One interesting twists was that one of the King's Guard was played with some flair by a black actor (name unknown) with light homosexual overtones. He kept complaining about his pink hat with a big pink plume and about his clothes getting dirty. There wasn't really any sexual innuendo involved but quite a bit of lifestyle innuendo. It was something I hadn't seen before in this type of movie and the actor did a fair job with the script he was given. An interesting diversion...

The sword-play and stunt work was pretty weak. I have a little experience with sword-play and I suspect what was shown in the movie was more a result of a limited practice schedule. I have seen much better sword handling in a variety of situations and I think the actors just needed more practice before shooting. Especially since with a movie, the editor can do a lot to make it seem more dramatic by good cutting from shot to shot.

And there were a lot of shots. The filmakers did take time to get a lot of angles in the film. Clearly there was effort to do a lot of conceptual layout work before committing anything to film. It's just that what they ended up with wasn't very special. The cinematography was one of the best aspects (relatively speaking) to the film. A lot of it was shot using natural sunlight and all the actors looked good in their costumes - another bright spot in the work. It was clear that this film was shot entirely in one physical location with a cheesy-looking "ruins" serving as the focal point of action. The credits gave a big kudos to such-in-such a ranch...

"The King's Guard" would make for nice family-friendly viewing for all ages but won't hold adults attention for any length of time. While there are plenty of deaths during the film there is no blood or gore of any kind so younger kids are safe with this one. Unless you are a fan of one of the cast members go rent Princess Bride.

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