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The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

  • Indiewire
The 20 Scariest Movie Scenes of the 21st Century
Horror movies are so much more than the sum of its parts, but no genre is more dependent on the power of discrete scenes, self-contained episodes to make you feel like you’re sweating through what’s happening on screen first-hand. It doesn’t matter if a horror movie is an atmospheric slow-burn, or if it’s a symphony of jump-scares that alternates between peaks of sustained tension and long valleys of eerie calm, all of the most terrifying films rely on a few unforgettable moments. Some of these instances are long setpieces, some are just perfectly executed jolts, but all of them are exquisitely traumatizing microcosms of the movies that contain them.

Read More:The 20 Best Foreign-Language Horror Films of the 21st Century, From ‘Trouble Every Day’ to ‘Let the Right One In

Shut off the lights, turn up the sound, and enjoy our list of the 20 scariest movie scenes of the 21st Century.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Jigsaw’ Review: Much Like the Characters, You, Too, Will Long for the Sweet Release of Death

  • Indiewire
‘Jigsaw’ Review: Much Like the Characters, You, Too, Will Long for the Sweet Release of Death
The question with a movie like “Jigsaw,” which was preceded by seven “Saw” movies and did not screen for press, isn’t “Is it good?” but rather “How bad is it?” The answer, dear reader, is “quite.” “Jigsaw” is quite bad.

Not that it matters much. The eighth installment in a horror franchise isn’t meant to be good; it’s meant to be gruesome. The Spierig Brothers’ contribution to the series is certainly that: One scene finds a team of medical examiners studiously examining a man with half his head blown off; another shows the results of a woman being injected with hydrochloric acid in all its gory detail. 13 years in, the filmmakers have all but given up pretending that such moments exist for any reason beyond their own sake.

Read More:‘Jigsaw’ Trailer: The ‘Saw’ Franchise Has Been Resurrected and It’s More Twisted Than Ever

It is
See full article at Indiewire »

Halloween 2017: Girls Just Want to Have Blood: 16 Horror Projects Directed by Women to Stream on Shudder

  • DailyDead
February is known as Women in Horror Month, when the spotlight is put on female filmmakers working inside our favorite genre, and many horror sites run pieces about movies directed by women. And that’s great! But there’s no reason why that spotlight should be limited to only one month, particularly when there are so many brilliant and talented female filmmakers working in the genre. Why not use this October to hit up these titles on Shudder and get to know some of the most exciting female voices in horror right now?

Prevenge (2016, dir. Alice Lowe) Alice Lowe writes, directs, and stars in this darkly comic, twisted fantasy about a woman who is very, very pregnant (Lowe herself was pregnant during shooting) and goes on a killing spree when her unborn baby talks to her and tells her to take revenge for a past tragedy. The film never fully transcends its gimmick,
See full article at DailyDead »

New to Streaming: ‘Dawson City: Frozen Time,’ ‘Marjorie Prime,’ ‘Lady Macbeth,’ ‘Landline,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Abundant Acreage Available (Angus MacLachlan)

Faith-based cinema is as diverse a genre as there is, from the extreme, often violent portraits of devotion from established directors like Martin Scorsese and Mel Gibson, to the attacks on logic in the God’s Not Dead and Left Behind pictures. Angus MacLachlan, a great storyteller of the not-too-deep south, offers a nuanced example of what this genre can bring, returning with the moving Abundant Acreage Available.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Hot Docs 2017 Women Directors: Meet Vaishali Sinha — “Ask the Sexpert”

“Ask the Sexpert”

Vaishali Sinha co-directed and produced the feature documentary “Made in India,” which focused on the personal stories behind the phenomenon of outsourcing surrogate mothers to India. The award-winning film premiered at Hot Docs and aired on PBS in 2012. Sinha has also produced numerous shorts.

“Ask the Sexpert” will premiere at the 2017 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival on May 1.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Vs: “Ask the Sexpert” is a film about a highly popular 93-year-old sex advice columnist in Mumbai. His daily column has been a city staple for the last 10 years. In the face of a ban on comprehensive sex education in schools in several states in India, the column’s brand of non-moralistic advice and humor has emboldened many to write in with their questions.

While a character-driven film, it is also a lens into a larger society and how human experiences have much in common.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Vs: I wanted to explore a story in the area of sexuality in urban India. Talking about sex carries a cultural taboo, although there are changes taking place now. I was seeking a space where people make their honest and rawest admissions of desire and dilemmas. This led me to the idea of a therapist or someone similar — a place where one would feel like they could benefit from telling the truth, or that at the very least they had nothing to lose.

Long story short, I quickly came across my central subject, who is wildly popular from his question and answer column.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Vs: It would be great if the film stays with people long after the curtain closes. On a micro-level I would love it if the film could lead to discussions between partners and between parents and children.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Vs: Telling a story about a character and ideas is both fun and hard work.

Funding was another difficult aspect. Constant grant writing and creating work samples can wear you down, but I was lucky to have some amazing funders. I’m also grateful to have an absolutely stellar team including producorial partner Mridu Chandra.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Vs: This film is a presentation by my company Coast to Coast Films in co-production with Itvs, who is our principal funder. Itvs is a leading funder and distributor for Public Media in the U.S. We’re just so honored to have them back a sex positive film.

But long before Itvs, there were other organizations who came in at very crucial moments with support for development and production, namely Catapult Fund, the MacArthur Foundation, and Tribeca Film Institute. Fireland Media — an incredible player in the doc world that helps filmmakers of color — provided mentorship support.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Hot Docs?

Vs: I couldn’t be more excited. This is where I premiered my first feature documentary, “Made in India,” and that was a phenomenal experience. Hot Docs is so professional and has an incredibly strong market. And Toronto audiences love documentaries.

Ultimately, my goal is to have this seen far and wide and jog conversations. We pitched our film at Hot Docs Forum in 2015 to a warm reception and we’re excited to come back and share the finished film.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Vs: Best advice: Keep it up.

Worst advice: Keep it up.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Vs: Trust your instincts and don’t hesitate to assert yourself.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Vs: I’m going to be totally random off the top of my head and say Claire Denis’ “Trouble Every Day,” because it’s bold and arresting.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Vs: I’m not entirely sure. I think there are opportunities being created but we have a long way to go as a lot of the commissioned content is still [going to men]. But creative ideas will always be in demand and there are many conscientious industry members and organizations making an effort to help facilitate conversations or create networking spaces for women to meet commissioners. So, there is progress.

https://medium.com/media/d3c49012b7b580079d98a165c1a11693/href

Hot Docs 2017 Women Directors: Meet Vaishali Sinha — “Ask the Sexpert” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Raw review – cannibal fantasy makes for a tender dish

Julia Ducournau’s debut feature about a young woman’s emerging taste for human flesh is an exhilarating blend of horror, humour and heartbreak

This exhilarating French-Belgian debut from writer/director Julia Ducournau is a feast for ravenous cinephiles, an extreme yet intimate tale of identity crises that blends Cronenbergian body horror with humour and heartbreak as it sinks its teeth deep into the sins of the flesh.

When a young woman arrives at veterinary college, her primary desire is to fit in, to follow in the footsteps of a proud family tradition. But when rookie hazing rituals force her to taste forbidden fruit (specifically, raw rabbit liver), the devout vegetarian discovers previously suppressed appetites. One minute she’s a strait-laced, straight-a student, the next she’s drooling at the sight of a freshly severed finger and lusting after the tempting torso of her muscular room-mate. What follows is a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The female directors bringing new blood to horror films

  • The Guardian - Film News
Women are sinking their teeth ever deeper into horror. We chart their rise and talk to directors Ana Lily Amirpour, Julia Ducournau and Karyn Kusama

There’s a moment in French film-maker Julia Ducournau’s prize-winning feature debut Raw in which a young vegetarian (ethereally played by Garance Marillier) finds herself unexpectedly ravenous at the sight of a severed finger. It’s a deliciously horrifying vignette, squirm-inducingly squishy, yet somehow bizarrely sensual. Like Claire Denis’s controversial 2001 shocker Trouble Every Day, Raw takes an intimate approach to the taboo subject of cannibalism, sinking its teeth into the sins of the flesh. As all great horror films should, it touches a nerve – simultaneously repelling and seducing its audience, sucking us in and spitting us out.

For horror fans, Raw is the latest in an encouraging wave of genre-bending movies which have twisted familiar tropes to new and unsettling ends. At the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Recollecting The Crimson Rivers, a Seemingly Forgotten French Horror/Thriller

  • Dread Central
For a while there, French horror was the big thing. We horror fans were getting genre flicks that were so gruesome and grotesque, it almost boggled the mind. Films like Inside, Frontier(s), Trouble Every Day, and the like were shocking… Continue Reading →

The post Recollecting The Crimson Rivers, a Seemingly Forgotten French Horror/Thriller appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

NYC Weekend Watch: Paul Schrader, ‘Cat People,’ Halloween & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

A Paul Schrader retrospective is held this weekend, with the likes of Mishima and American Gigolo screening.

Trouble Every Day: Halloween at Metrograph” brings several titles, including Claire Denis‘ new classic.

Arthur Penn‘s Night Moves and Roger Corman‘s Masque of Red Death screen on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

A retrospective concerning
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Weekend Warrior 10/28/16: Inferno, Gimme Danger and More

  • LRM Online
Welcome back to the Weekend Warrior, your weekly look at the new movies hitting theaters this weekend, as well as other cool events and things to check out.

This Past Weekend:

In one of the busier weekends of the month, two of the movies did better than I predicted and two did worse. The real winner of the weekend was Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween, which did far better than anyone thought with an opening weekend of $28.5 million in just 2,260 theaters or $12,611 per theater. It ended up completely demolishing Tom Cruise’s action sequel Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, which opened in almost 1,500 more theaters, but at least that ended up around where I predicted with $22.9 million. Ouija: Origin of Evil came out slightly below my prediction to take third place with $14 million, while the Fox comedy Keeping Up with the Joneses bombed even worse than I expected with $5.5 million in 3,000 theaters.
See full article at LRM Online »

[Tiff Review] Raw

18-year-old Justine (Garance Marillier) is a meek vegetarian, which motivates her decision to enroll as a freshman at the same prestigious veterinary school as her older sister, Alexia (Ella Rumpf). Existing far from reality, this university houses authority figures that, outside a teacher who has it out for her, are all obnoxious, bullying young people, their hazing rituals emphasized to comedic effect. This frosh-week mentality essentially makes Justine the subject of a reverse-slut-shaming from her peers, where she’s made to feel bad for being a virgin. An ostentatiously directed party scene early in the film portrays the school as almost one big orgy she’s frankly just not invited to.

An awakening of a different kind takes place, the sight of blood surrounding Justine on a frequent basis drawing out a vampiric cannibal condition similar to the diseased ones from New French Extremity highpoint Trouble Every Day. It repeatedly
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Little Men’: Listen To Original Score From Dickon Hinchliffe, Founding Member of The Tindersticks

  • Indiewire
‘Little Men’: Listen To Original Score From Dickon Hinchliffe, Founding Member of The Tindersticks
Ira Sach’s “Little Men” follows Jake Jardine (Theo Taplitz), a 13-year-old who lives with his parents (Greg Kinnear and Jennifer Ehle) in Manhattan. When Jake’s grandfather dies, the family moves into his Brooklyn apartment where they find dressmaker Leonor (Paulina Garcia) who owns a shop in the building with her son Tony (Michael Barbieri). Jake and Tony become quick friends but when Jake’s parents try to raise the rent on Leonor, tensions run high and the kids are brought into uncomfortable adult conflicts faster than they anticipated.

Read More: Ira Sachs: How a Daring Independent Filmmaker Went Family-Friendly With ‘Little Men

The film has garnered widespread positive reviews for its humanistic approach, powerful performances, and emotionally resonant writing, but one of “Little Men’s” most striking elements is its score. Composed by Dickon Hinchliffe, a founding member of the English band the Tindersticks, the score’s
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Transfiguration’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Transfiguration’
In contemporary New York, a bullied teenager is plagued by an apparent need to drink human blood — an instinct he fulfills without much trouble, leaving a modest trail of corpses in his wake, even as he forms a tentative bond with a lonely young neighbor. The debut feature from Brooklyn-born writer-director Michael O’Shea, “The Transfiguration” seemingly came from nowhere to secure a premiere in the Un Certain Regard strand at Cannes, generating buzz aplenty — but does it deliver? A morose tone and reluctance to give up the goods as a straight-up horror film may make distributors at the splat-tastic end of the genre spectrum wary. Outfits inclined towards arthouse slow-burners, however, should have an easier time packaging its nihilistic conclusions as existential depth.

There’s wearing your heart on your sleeve, and then there’s “The Transfiguration,” an addition to the extensive onscreen vampire canon whose influences are name-checked throughout.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Terence Davies, Straub-Huillet, ‘Dead Ringers’ & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

Before his masterful Sunset Song begins its U.S. run, Terence Davies will be given a complete retrospective at MoMI. His self-titled trilogy screens on Saturday and Sunday; the latter day also brings Distant Voices, Still Lives and, with a post-screening Q & A to boot, The Long Day Closes.

Metrograph

“Welcome
See full article at The Film Stage »

[Review] Martyrs

In 2008, writer-director Pascal Laugier contributed to the realm of New French Extremity — a movement defined by such unrelenting bloodbaths as Claire Denis’s Trouble Every Day and Alexandre Aja’s High Tension — with Martyrs. While lesser films of its ilk received the dreaded “torture porn” label, Laugier’s shocking revenge picture gained cult admiration by padding its wrenching depictions of child abuse, hardcore gore, and ghastly (if not inventive) body horror with a provocative reflection on the meaning of suffering. Like many popular overseas horror selections, the film has received an American remake that may not resonate quite as much.

Directed by Kevin and Michael Goetz (Scenic Route), and based on a script by Mark L. Smith (who, as the co-writer of The Revenant, knows a thing or two about grueling violence), the new Martyrs begins much like its predecessor: with a little girl named Lucie (Ever Prishkulnik) escaping an
See full article at The Film Stage »

Daily | Goings On | Acropolis, Ncfs, Close-Up

  • Keyframe
We begin today's roundup of goings on around the world in New York with notes on revivals of Todd Solondz's Welcome to the Dollhouse, Claire Denis's Trouble Every Day, Donald Cammell's White of the Eye, Freddie Francis's Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown, John Ford's How Green was My Valley and Jean Eustache's The Mother and the Whore. Plus: Raya Martin and Mark Peranson's La última película and works by Sharon Lockhart, Manoel de Oliveira and Lewis Klahr in Los Angeles, Michael Haneke in London, fresh filmmakers in Switzerland and Hong Kong—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

NYC Weekend Watch: Miyazaki, Welles, Mizoguchi & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

IFC Center

For the Studio Ghibli retrospective, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind will screen on 35mm at midnight this Friday, alongside My Neighbor Totoro. Princess Mononoke can be seen at midnight on Saturday, and Only Yesterday plays throughout the weekend.

Alien, Fight Club, and an archival print of Horror of Dracula screen at midnight.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The 20 Greatest Films Directed by Female Filmmakers

“Criminally unfair. Those are the two words that spring to mind when I consider the fate of female directors throughout the short history of the cinematic medium. Not enough opportunity. Appalling sexism. Terrible chance and circumstances, coupled with biases, slander and mistrust,” our friend Scout Tafoya stated when asking a group of critics for their favorite films directed by female filmmakers. He added, “When I began asking for these lists from all the critics below many replied reluctantly. Their reasoning that so many of their films would be modern, that so many of the classics would be homogenous, is not without justification. But it’s no one’s fault that we all fall back on the same seven classics.”

He continues, “It’s a worldwide shortage of support and funding for female artists. It’s a lack of distribution of more esoteric work by women. It’s many major film
See full article at The Film Stage »

Spotlight on the films of Women Horror Directors

  • SoundOnSight
Although relatively scarce, horror movies directed by women are out there. You may have to turn over a few rocks to know who they are and their material might be a little more difficult to get your hands on, but these directors deserve just as much attention and scrutiny as their male counterparts, who have long dominated the genre. The following discusses selections of female directors’ forays into the business of terror. (This post contains spoilers)

Antonia Bird

The late director Antonia Bird’s Ravenous is a bizarre amalgamation of humor and horror that explores cannibalism with warped nuance. The strangely cacophonous score builds up tension as craven outcasts face a glutinous and depraved attacker whose strength seems fortified by his consumption of human flesh. Set during America’s westward expansion, the metaphor of humanity’s insatiable appetite for power is plain to see, but its execution indulges in such
See full article at SoundOnSight »

NYC Weekend Watch: David Cronenberg, Classic 3-D, Mathieu Amalric & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

Maurice Pialat‘s six-hour miniseries, Le maison de bois, will conclude the career-spanning retrospective.

“It Came from Within: A David Cronenberg Horror Weekend” brings the director’s classics to the big screen.

Film Forum

“Classic 3-D” offers three dimensions of repertory viewing, with titles such as Dial M for Murder and House of Wax.
See full article at The Film Stage »
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