7.5/10
24
2 user

A Touch of the Poet (1974)

Cornelius "Con" Melody is an Irish tavern keeper in New England who lives in reverence of his former days as a nobleman and decorated officer in the British army during the Napoleonic wars.... See full summary »

Writer:

(play)
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Robert Phalen ...
...
...
...
...
Dan Roche
John Heffernan ...
Howland Chamberlain ...
Patch Riley (as Howland Chamberlin)
Carrie Nye ...
Deborah Harford
Humphrey Davis ...
Nicholas Gadsby
Edit

Storyline

Cornelius "Con" Melody is an Irish tavern keeper in New England who lives in reverence of his former days as a nobleman and decorated officer in the British army during the Napoleonic wars. Impoverished now, he struts about in his uniform and plots to make money by manipulating the love of his daughter for the son of a wealthy manufacturer. His daughter sees through his façade and his chicanery and begins to plot for herself. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

filmed play | based on play | See All (2) »

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 April 1974 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

To aggigma tou poiiti  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Kim Stanley was nominated for the 1959 Tony Award (New York City) for Actress in a Drama for "A Touch of the Poet". See more »

Goofs

As Con and Sara struggle by the door, a mic can be seen being pointed at them from the floor beyond the doorway as a sound man hides behind the wall trying to record them at that position. See more »

Connections

Version of Fast ein Poet (1961) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Spirited performance of inadvertently-funny O'Neill play.
25 February 2000 | by (Emeryville, California) – See all my reviews

Great fun, and fine performances from the ensemble cast that surround mock heroic figure Weaver, whose mantra is "I was with them, but not among them." If you dislike the self-importance and self-pity in O'Neill's "major" works (as I do), you will find it a pleasure to see him unintentionally deconstruct himself in this less-performed play.


3 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?