Mein liebster Feind - Klaus Kinski (1999) - News Poster

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Newswire: Surprise! Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero made a new movie, Best F(r)iends

Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero are sort of like the outsider-cinema equivalent of Werner Herzog and Klaus Kinski—with the roles reversed, of course—so it seems appropriate that Wiseau would riff on the title of Herzog’s 1999 documentary on his tumultuous relationship with Kinski, My Best Fiend, for his big reunion with his The Room star. According to The Hollywood Reporter, which debuted the trailer today, Best F(r)iends was filmed “quietly” over the past two months in L.A. and Canada, and has been kept largely under wraps until now:

Directed by former wedding photographer Gary Fong, Best F(r)iends is based on a story by Sestero inspired by a road trip he and Wiseau took back in 2003. Sestero stars as a man who, after his entire family is killed in a car crash (note the bloodstained shirt), gets picked up off the side ...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Promo: Werner Herzog Dives Into The Heart of The Internet

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Promo: Werner Herzog Dives Into The Heart of The Internet
The Internet is all around us, connecting humans with each other and providing the world with more information than ever before, but what is its existential impact? How has it changed our worldviews? Director Werner Herzog chronicles the virtual world from its origins to its outermost reaches in his new documentary “Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World.” Containing interviews with such luminaries as Bob Kahn, Elon Musk, and Sebastian Thrun, Herzog explores the digital landscape with his trademark curiosity and sparks a number of provocative conversations about how the online world has immeasurably transformed our real world, from business to education, space travel to healthcare, and even our personal relationships. Watch an exclusive promo for the film below.

Read More: Sundance Review: Werner Herzog’s ‘Lo and Behold’ Will Make You Experience the Internet in New Ways

Werner Herzog is one of the more acclaimed film directors of the 20th century.
See full article at Indiewire »

Werner Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions - A Feature Film Retrospective

Werner Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions, a retrospective dedicated to Werner Herzog's fiction filmmaking, will be running on Mubi in the United States from May 28 - July 29, 2016.My Best Fiend: A metaphor for...something "It’s a great metaphor,” Werner Herzog declares proudly towards the end of My Best Fiend, his autobiographical reflection on fifteen years of cinematic collaboration with actor Klaus Kinski. The metaphor in question is visual. Herzog and film set photographer Beat Presser are looking at a black and white photo hanging in Presser’s apartment. It’s a striking tableau and gripping enough that it would become the poster image for Herzog's 1982 collaboration with Kinski, Fitzcarraldo. The titular character stands in the foreground, yet with his back to the camera. His emotions are unavailable, but he is undoubtedly preoccupied with the 300 ton steamboat high above him at an impossible 90 degree angle, as it disappears up
See full article at MUBI »

Herzog: Ecstatic Truths - A Werner Herzog Documentary Retrospective

  • MUBI
Herzog: Ecstatic Truths, a retrospective dedicated to Werner Herzog's documentary work, will be running on Mubi in the United States from March 31 - May 20, 2016. It will be followed by Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions, devoted to the director's fictional features.“The collapse of the stellar universe will occur – like creation – in grandiose splendor." In white letters sharply defined against a black screen, Blaise Pascal’s famous quote fittingly opens Lessons of Darkness (1992), Werner Herzog’s spectacular documentary about ecological disaster and the Gulf War. I say fittingly because the quote is fake (it was fabricated by Herzog to direct his audience to engage on a very “high level” before the movie even properly begins) and because Lessons of Darkness, for all its profundity, isn’t exactly a true documentary, either. It is, however, exemplary of Herzog's nonfiction style.Werner Herzog’s fame has been focused on his feature-length fiction films since
See full article at MUBI »

What to Watch This Week: 'Neighbors,' 'Gotham,' 'Scandal,' & More

  • Moviefone
At a loss for what to watch this week? From new DVDs and Blu-rays, to what's streaming on Netflix, we've got you covered.

New on DVD and Blu-ray

"Neighbors"

Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen star as a married couple living in a nice suburban neighborhood with their new baby. When a fraternity moves in next door, the Radners struggle with feeling terrible uncool and also having their lives wrecked by a bunch of hard-partying bros. Zac Efron co-stars as Teddy, the head of the frat, with Dave Franco as his right-hand man.

"Halloween: The Complete Collection"

Do you need this 15-disc Blu-ray box set comprised of all of the "Halloween" movies, including the producer's cut of "Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers," Rob Zombie's 2007 and 2009 versions, audio commentary, and lots more? "Need" is such a childish word. You won't literally die if you didn't manage to order
See full article at Moviefone »

Werner Herzog on His Unique Career, Clowns, and Getting Punk’d by Mel Brooks

  • Vulture
Werner Herzog on His Unique Career, Clowns, and Getting Punk’d by Mel Brooks
If you gaze into Werner Herzog talking about Werner Herzog for long enough, does Werner Herzog gaze back into you? I pondered that question in late June as the 71-year-old director sat across from me at a conference table in the Santa Monica offices of Shout! Factory, the production house behind the newly released Herzog: The Collection, a Blu-ray retrospective featuring 16 of his early art-house films, including the masterpieces Stroszek (1977) and Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1979), hits like Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), and self-reflective meta-documentaries like My Best Fiend (1999) and Little Dieter Needs to Fly (1997). Leading up to the interview, I had immersed myself in so many Herzog movies, so many documentaries, and so many mini-featurettes — and then re-watched the films to hear Herzog’s commentary tracks — that by the time I was in his presence asking him questions and listening to him respond in his famously
See full article at Vulture »

Interview: Werner Herzog On 'Herzog: The Collection'

The new box set “Herzog: the Collection,” released by Shout Factory, collects 16 of Herzog's films, presented on Blu-ray for the first time, from his 1970 debut "Even Dwarves Started Small" to 1999's “My Best Fiend." Herzog has 57 films to his name, of course—and counting—but these early works pulse with energy and strangeness, charm and power, gigantic ideals somehow being borne out of small budgets and limited resources by seemingly limitless passion and sheer force of will. Meeting Herzog to talk about the collection, the 71-year old director is in a back room at Shout Factory, in a less-than-starry part of Los Angeles, where industrial parks contain secret creations and creators; with his reading glasses at hand, Herzog is passing the time between interviews autographing a number of the box sets or special orders. Talking with Herzog about his early work can't help connect to his later work, his current
See full article at The Playlist »

'Noah', Herzog Collection, 'Big Chill' and 'Twin Peaks' On DVD and Blu-ray This Week

Herzog: The Collection I've been reviewing Werner Herzog movies for the last 13 weeks or whatever it is and all in anticipation of this new 16-film collection from Shout Factory, which finally releases today and includes Even Dwarfs Started Small, Land of Silence and Darkness, Fata Morgana, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Heart of Glass, Stroszek, Woyzeck, Nosferatu the Vampyre, Fitzcarraldo, Ballad of the Little Soldier, Where the Green Ants Dream, Cobra Verde, Lessons of Darkness, Little Dieter Needs to Fly and My Best Fiend. Of the bunch I can tell you flat out Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Stroszek, Nosferatu the Vampyre and Fitzcarraldo are great films and that's without the special features this set contains, which are: English Audio Commentaries: Even Dwarfs Started Small, Fata Morgana, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Heart of Glass,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Contest: Win A Copy Of ShoutFactory’s Massive Limited Edition Werner Herzog Boxset ‘The Collection’

This contest is so good it speaks for itself. ShoutFactory is putting out a massive, limited edition Werner Hezog box set titled “Herzog: The Collection.” Limited to 5,000 copies, the 13-disc set features 16 acclaimed films and documentaries from the German iconoclast, 15 of which are making their Blu-ray debuts. "The Collection" also features a 40 page booklet that includes photos, an essay by award-winning author Stephen J. Smith, and in-depth film synopses by Herzog scholars Brad Prager and Chris Wahl. Herzog: The Collection includes: Even Dwarfs Started Small Land of Silence and Darkness Fata Morgana Aguirre, the Wrath of God The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser Heart of Glass Stroszek Woyzeck Nosferatu the Vampyre Fitzcarraldo Ballad of the Little Soldier Where the Green Ants Dream Cobra Verde Lessons of Darkness Little Dieter Needs to Fly My Best Fiend · English Audio Commentaries: Even Dwarfs Started Small, Fata Morgana,...
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"Herzog: The Collection", Limited Edition Set To Be Released By Shout! Factory

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release from Shout! Factory:

A visionary creator unlike any other, with a passion for unveiling truths about nature and existence by blurring the line between reality and fiction, Werner Herzog is undoubtedly one of cinema’s most controversial and enigmatic figures. Audiences the world over have marveled at his uniquely moving, often disturbing, but always awe-inspiring stories, and his ever-growing body of work has inspired an untold number of filmmakers. He is, and continues to be, the most daring filmmaker of our time.

In celebration of this cinematic vanguard, Shout! Factory will release Herzog: The Collection on July 29th, 2014. Limited to 5,000 copies, the 13-disc box set features 16 acclaimed films and documentaries, 15 of which are making their Blu-ray debuts. Herzog: The Collection also features a 40 page booklet that includes photos, an essay by award-winning author Stephen J. Smith, and in-depth film synopses by Herzog
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Blu-ray Review: Herzog's "Aguirre, Wrath Of God" (1971) Starring Klaus Kinski, BFI Release

  • CinemaRetro
(This review pertains to the limited edition Region 2 UK release from the BFI)

By Paul Risker

As well as asking the question “Is cinema more important than life?” Francois Truffaut showed a flair for statement when he declared Werner Herzog to be “The most important filmmaker alive.”

If the BFI have the final word this summer, it will be remembered as the summer of Herzog, as they align themselves with the German filmmaker and journey headlong into his cinematic world. This rendezvous starts with a descent into the past with two distinct forms of horror - the hallucinatory horror of human obsession in Aguirre, Wrath of God and the genre horror Nosferatu.

Aguirre, Wrath of God represents an important entry in Herzog's career, and by coupling it with his 1971 feature documentary Fata Morgana, this release highlights the spatial thread that runs through his cinema. From the jungle, the desert, Antarctica
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Blu-ray Review: 'Aguirre, the Wrath of God'

  • CineVue
★★★★★The extremities of the human psyche have for decades fascinated Bavarian auteur Werner Herzog; from the gleeful revolt of Even Dwarfs Started Small (1970) right through to the drug-fuelled excesses of Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call - New Orleans (2009). More than one of the crowning achievements of his fiction filmography centres on the wild-eyed Klaus Kinski, who appeared in five of Herzog films as well as being the subject of the documentary, My Best Fiend (1999). The first and arguably the best of these collaborations was on a trek into the veritable heart of darkness in the exquisite Aguirre, The Wrath of God (1972), which now arrives on Blu-ray courtesy of the BFI.
See full article at CineVue »

'My Best Fiend - Klaus Kinski' (1999) Movie Review

I absolutely need to watch more films starring German actor Klaus Kinski. Outside of his Werner Herzog appearances I've only seen him in Sergio Leone's For a Few Dollars More, David Lean's Doctor Zhivago and Sergio Corbucci's The Great Silence and with IMDb crediting him in over 130 films, I've clearly missed a few. Kinski had a raw intensity Herzog clearly knew how to exploit, most notably in Aguirre, The Wrath of God and Fitzcarraldo, films where the production was as harrowing if not more so than the stories they were telling making it hard to tell where Kinski the actor ends and his character begins. Within the confines of Herzog's 1999 documentary My Best Fiend - Klaus Kinski, we get a small glimpse of the man Herzog met when he was only a child as he returns to the now-renovated apartment where he first met Kinski. He takes us on a walking tour,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #243

This week wasn't as busy in terms of number of movies watched as last week. I caught two movies in theaters -- The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and Locke -- and at home I watched Burden of Dreams, Les Blank's documentary on the making of Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo, and just last night I watched Herzog's Nosferatu: Phantom der Nacht. As I've already said, I'm revisiting 16 of Werner Herzog's movies and reviewing each of them over the course of the next several weeks, this week I'm hoping to have reviews of both Fitzcarraldo and My Best Fiend, but I don't want to review either until I've finished reading Herzog's "Conquest of the Useless: Reflections from the Making of Fitzcarraldo", but I'm finding it hard to fit in enough time to do just that. This coming week is going to be busy for me as screenings for the Seattle Film Festival get underway,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'Aguirre, the Wrath of God' (1977) Movie Review

When you begin exploring the work of director Werner Herzog some (if not most) will argue Aguirre, the Wrath of God is likely the best place to start. Though I don't think you get the full picture of this portion of Herzog's career without including Fitzcarraldo or the documentary My Best Fiend, which came another 12 years later, detailing Herzog's work with Aguirre star Klaus Kinski. Without Kinski, Aguirre, Fitzcarraldo and, most likely, Herzog would not be the same. With that in mind, know this is the first review in a coming triptych, meant to build off one another to the point an entire picture begins to form. History, in this case, cannot be ignored. Considered an entry in the West German New Wave, Aguirre is very loosely based on the accounts of Spanish Dominican monk Gaspar de Carvajal (played in the film by Del Negro) as well as the life
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #242

It was a very busy week for me as I saw three movies in theaters and watched another five at home. As for the theatrical trips, they included two I've already reviewed -- The Other Woman (read the review here) and Brick Mansions (read the review here) -- and Jon Favreau's Chef (5/9), which I already wrote a little about, but I'll say it again here, I enjoyed it... review coming in a couple weeks. At home I watched a screener for Last Passenger (review here) and I also watched Blue Ruin On Demand and I'll have a review of that this coming week, but I did post this on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ropeofsilicon/status/459850214036078592 Then, last week I mentioned how I was digging into Werner Herzog's catalog courtesy of Fandor.com as they are releasing 16 of Herzog's titles, one a week, in advance of Shout Factory's release
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #241

This week involved a lot of movies at home, including the new Blu-ray for Double Indemnity, the new Blu-ray for William Friedkin's Sorcerer (read my review here) and, last night, I watched Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God on Fandor.com as I'll be reviewing 16 of Herzog's upcoming movies leading up to Shout Factory's release of Herzog: The Collection Limited Edition on July 29. The set includes Even Dwarfs Started Small, Nosferatu The Vampyre, Land Of Silence And Darkness, Fitzcarraldo, Fata Morgana, Ballad Of Little Soldier, Aguirre, The Wrath Of God, Where The Green Ants Dream, The Enigma Of Kaspar Hauser, Cobra Verde, Heart Of Glass, Lessons Of Darkness, Stroszek, Little Dieter Needs To Fly, Woyzeck and My Best Fiend and Fandor will be releasing one new title each week leading up to the release, each in HD. Of that lot, I've only seen Aguirre and Fitzcarraldo before,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Sixteen Classic Werner Herzog Films Will Be Streaming on Fandor

Herzog fans, rejoice. Fandor has attained exclusive streaming rights for no less than 16 (!) of the German auteur's films. "Aguirre the Wrath of God" has its bow on April 10, with one new title launching each week through July 2014. Fandor's recent CEO and Toh! contributor Ted Hope helped to negotiate the deal for the site. So, which Herzog films are part of this new collection? The titles span three decades, incorporating both narrative and documentary, and include all the director's work with his stormy muse Klaus Kinski (as well as the documentary on their insanely tempestuous relationship, "My Best Fiend"). Meanwhile, the 71-year-old Herzog is still as active and marvelously unpredictable as ever: He's finishing up filming in Morocco on Gertrude Bell/T.E. Lawrence biopic "Queen of the Desert," starring Nicole Kidman and Robert Pattinson, and has school shooting dark comedy "Vernon God Little" up next, with the unlikely names of Pamela Anderson,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Kino Lorber takes 'Manuscripts'

  • ScreenDaily
Kino Lorber has acquired Us rights to Mohammad Rasoulof’s Iranian drama about state censorship, Manuscripts Don’t Burn.

Rasoulof’s latest film marks a return to filmmaking after the Iranian Revolutionary Court sentenced him in 2010 to six years in jail and a 20-year filmmaking ban.

The prison term was subsequently reduced to one year. After flying to Iran in September 2013 with the intent to return to Hamburg later that month, Rasoulof’s passport was confiscated by Iranian authorities. He remains unable to leave Iran.

Rasoulof filmed Manuscripts Don’t Burn without federal permission and in order to maintain the safety of the film’s crew, their names have been removed from the film’s final credits. The story centres on an Iranian author secretly writing his memoirs that the authorities want to destroy.

The drama screened in Un Certain Regard in Cannes last year where it won the Fipresci Prize. It also screened
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kino Lorber takes Manuscripts Don't Burn

  • ScreenDaily
Kino Lorber has acquired Us rights to Mohammad Rasoulof’s Iranian drama about state censorship, Manuscripts Don’t Burn.

Rasoulof’s latest film marks a return to filmmaking after the Iranian Revolutionary Court sentenced him in 2010 to six years in jail and a 20-year filmmaking ban.

The prison term was subsequently reduced to one year. After flying to Iran in September 2013 with the intent to return to Hamburg later that month, Rasoulof’s passport was confiscated by Iranian authorities. He remains unable to leave Iran.

Rasoulof filmed Manuscripts Don’t Burn without federal permission and in order to maintain the safety of the film’s crew, their names have been removed from the film’s final credits. The story centres on an Iranian author secretly writing his memoirs that the authorities want to destroy.

The drama screened in Un Certain Regard in Cannes last year where it won the Fipresci Prize. It also screened
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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