The House of Mirth
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

11 items from 2016


Six selected for Indian film-makers residency

11 September 2016 4:00 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The film-makers will each receive an expert mentor to help develop their feature projects.

Dubai International Film Festival (Diff) is partnering with the Pjlf Three Rivers Residency, designed to support Indian film-makers in developing their scripts. The residency provides six writer-directors a year with a distraction-free space to write their scripts, the help of an expert mentor and the opportunity to present their projects at Diff.

The six filmmakers selected this year include Kanu Behl [pictured], whose debut Titli screened at Cannes Un Certain Regard in 2014, Arun Karthick, who debuted with Rotterdam title The Strange Case Of Shiva, Raj Rishi More, who served as assistant director on The Lunchbox, Miransha Naik, Sonal Jain and Pushan Kripalani. Naik recently completed post-production on Juze, which has been picked up by Films Boutique and secured a French release through Sophie Dulac Distribution.

This year’s advisers include Molly Stensgaard, Franz Rodenkirchen, Marten Rabarts, Gyula Gazdag and Olivia Stewart, who has developed »

- lizshackleton@gmail.com (Liz Shackleton)

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‘A Quiet Passion’ Trailer: Cynthia Nixon Embodies Reclusive Emily Dickinson In Terence Davies-Directed Biopic

17 August 2016 12:09 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The story of the reclusive American poet Emily Dickinson comes to life in Terence Davies’ “A Quiet Passion,” which will be screened at the Toronto International Film Festival this fall.

A new festival trailer for the period drama was just released and showcases Cynthia Nixon as the renowned artist as she struggles with the world around her.

A Quiet Passion” is a unique insight into Dickinson’s life and obsessions, and follows the writer from her schoolgirl days in Amherst, Massachusetts to her years writing in near-total isolation, where she produced over a thousand poems that are now regarded as the finest and most inventive in American literature.

Read More: First Look: Cynthia Nixon as Emily Dickinson in Terence Davies’ ‘A Quiet Passion

The biopic also co-stars Jennifer Ehle as Dickinson’s sister, Lavinia, Keith Carradine as her father, Duncan Duff, Jodhi May, Joanna Bacon and Catherine Bailey. The picture »

- Liz Calvario

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NYC Weekend Watch: Robert Downey Sr., Anna Mangani, ‘Black Girl’ & More

19 May 2016 4:46 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Forum

The amazing films of Robert Downey Sr. play as part of “Robert Downey (The Original).” The still-shocking Putney Swope screens throughout this weekend; Greaser’s Palace can be seen on Saturday and Sunday, while the latter day offers a print of Chafed Elbows.

The restoration of Fritz Lang‘s Destiny begins its run.

The King and the Mockingbird »

- Nick Newman

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Sunset Song Review

13 May 2016 4:10 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Like his past work, Terence DaviesSunset Song sets aglow dusty memories of the past, telling a feminist story of domestic liberation that’s mythological in theme and scale despite taking place in a lonely homestead on the outskirts of rural Scotland in the early 20th century. No one does period drama quite like Davies, and his latest effort is just as transportive and lyrical as his previous work, though the story develops in a sort of inelegant, stilted way that doesn’t pay the strong-willed heroine at its center due justice.

The beating heart of the tale is a peasant farm girl, Chris Guthrie (Agyness Deyn), tender as can be and wise beyond her years. Her strength of spirit and nurturing nature stem from a horrific upbringing under her emotionally and physically abusive father (a heart-stoppingly terrifying Peter Mullan). We watch years pass at the Guthrie home, Blawearie, as »

- Bernard Boo

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Joshua Reviews Terence Davies’ Sunset Song [Theatrical Review]

13 May 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Despite being one of the most beloved art film directors of the last 30+ years, it’s a shockingly rare occasion that we are blessed with a new picture from filmmaker Terence Davies. With only Of Time And The City, a micro-budget, rarely seen essay film, Davies saw 11 years fall between The House of Mirth and his 2011 film The Deep Blue Sea. Thankfully though, that rate appears to be shrinking as his newest film, Sunset Song, debuts in theaters this weekend, and yet another film entitled A Quiet Passion is running the festival circuit.

But let’s not get ahead of things. Sunset Song premieres in limited release this weekend, and it’s yet another stunning achievement from one of the true masters of this era. Based on Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s 1932 novel of the same name, Song introduces us to Chris Guthrie, a young woman living with her family on »

- Joshua Brunsting

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NYC Weekend Watch: Amy Heckerling, J.G. Ballard, Noël Coward & More

12 May 2016 6:28 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Spend “A Weekend with Amy Heckerling” when Johnny Dangerously and Fast Times at Ridgemont High screen this Saturday, while Look Who’s Talking and Clueless show on Sunday. All are on 35mm.

For “Welcome to Metrograph: A-z,” see a print of Philippe Garrel‘s The Inner Scar on Friday and Sunday; André de Toth‘s »

- Nick Newman

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‘Sunset Song’ Review: Terence Davies’ Sweeping Lyricism Gets Undercut by His Prose

12 May 2016 12:40 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

It’s not just the shot of a field of corn that puts one in mind of Terrence Malick when watching Terence Davies’ “Sunset Song.” Like Malick, Davies has entered a period of unprecedented productivity in his golden years: After the long wait between 2000’s “The House of Mirth” and 2011’s “The Deep Blue Sea,” “Sunset Song,” which adapts a novel by Lewis Grassic Gibbon, is the first of two Davies movies slated for release in 2016. (The Emily Dickinson biopic “A Quiet Passion” should arrive in the fall.) But unlike Malick, whose increased output has left his recent movies feeling. »

- Sam Adams

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Daily | Terence Davies

5 May 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Starting this weekend, Terence Davies will be in New York as the Museum of the Moving Image presents a retrospective of his films, complete but for his latest, A Quiet Passion. He'll be discussing The Long Day Closes and Sunset Song, which opens in the States next week, and there'll be screenings of his Trilogy, Distant Voices, Still Lives, The House of Mirth with Gillian Anderson, Eric Stoltz, Anthony Lapaglia, Laura Linney, The Neon Bible with Gena Rowlands, Of Time and the City and The Deep Blue Sea with Rachel Weisz and Tom Hiddleston. We're gathering odes to one of Britain's greatest directors. » - David Hudson »

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‘Sunset Song’ Writer-Director Terence Davies on Making Non-Commercial Movies

13 April 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Critics adore Terence Davies for his cinematic formalism, achingly beautiful images, and portraits of society’s outsiders. Though hailed by his admirers as one of Britain’s greatest living filmmakers, he remains little known on this side of the Pond. That could change with “Sunset Song,” an adaptation of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s novel about a shy farmgirl, which Magnolia releases May 13, as well as “A Quiet Passion,” an Emily Dickinson biopic that earned raves at the Berlin Film Festival.

Do you ever set out to make a big commercial hit?

I haven’t got the talent to think commercially. I wish I did. I’d love to be a household name, like Pampers.

There was a decade between “The House of Mirth” and “The Deep Blue Sea” where you didn’t make narrative features. What happened? 

We were going through another phase in this country of “we’ve got »

- Brent Lang

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Berlin Film Review: ‘A Quiet Passion’

14 February 2016 12:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Beauty is not caused. It is,” Emily Dickinson famously wrote — a truism not always applicable to the cinema of Terence Davies, which can work mightily hard toward its beauty, often to rapturous effect. This most refined of filmmakers appears to have come unstuck, however, with the story of Dickinson herself. His most mannered and least fulfilling work to date, “A Quiet Passion” boasts meticulous craft and ornate verbiage in abundance, but confines Cynthia Nixon’s melancholia-stricken performance as arguably America’s greatest poet in an emotional straitjacket of variously arch storytelling tones — of which a prolonged experiment with quippy, Whit Stillman-esque deadpan is the most unhappily surprising. An evident labor of love for its suddenly prolific helmer, this “Passion” project nonetheless registers as a missed opportunity; audience affection will range from quiet to inaudible.

It’s been 16 years, following his richly textured Edith Wharton adaptation “The House of Mirth, »

- Guy Lodge

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‘A Quiet Passion’ Clip: Emily Dickinson Makes A Friend In Terence Davies’ Bio – Berlin

11 February 2016 5:12 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: Terence Davies’ Berlinale Special entry, A Quiet Passion, will debut here on Sunday, February 14. Written and directed by Davies (The House Of Mirth, The Deep Blue Sea), the biopic tells the story of Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist whose huge body of emotional and powerful literary work was discovered after her death. Cynthia Nixon and Jennifer Ehle star. The clip above sees the… »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

11 items from 2016


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