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Horror Highlights: Kate Beckinsale at Wizard World Sacramento, Peelers Blu-ray / DVD, Attack Of The 50 Foot Film Fest

If you live on the West Coast and you're a fan of Death Dealer Selene from the Underworld movies, then you'll want to mark the weekend of June 17th–18th on your calendar, because Kate Beckinsale will be a featured guest at Wizard World Sacramento. In today's Horror Highlights, we also have details on the Blu-ray / DVD release of Peelers and the lineup for Attack of the 50 Foot Film Fest in Atlanta.

Kate Beckinsale to Attend Wizard World Sacramento: Press Release: "Sacramento, Calif., June 5, 2017 – Kate Beckinsale, star of such films as Underworld and Pearl Harbor, and Val Kilmer, standout in Batman Forever and Top Gun, have been added to the top-flight celebrity roster at Wizard World Comic Con Sacramento at the Sacramento Convention Center. Both will appear on Saturday and Sunday, June 17-18, when they will greet fans, sign autographs, pose for photo ops and conduct interactive Q&A sessions with fans.
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Chariots of Fire’ Conductor Harry Rabinowitz Dies at 100

‘Chariots of Fire’ Conductor Harry Rabinowitz Dies at 100
Conductor and composer Harry Rabinowitz, who worked on more than 60 films including as the conductor on “Chariots of Fire,” has died at the age of 100, according to the BBC.

Rabinowitz was born in Johannesburg in 1916, and moved to England in 1946 to study at London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

He served as head of music at BBC TV Light Entertainment in the 1960s, and as head of music services at London Weekend Television in the 1970s. In 1977 he was awarded a national honor, the MBE.

He composed scores for many TV shows including “Reilly: Ace of Spies,” for which he received a BAFTA nomination in 1984.

Rabinowitz worked as a conductor on several films with British director Anthony Minghella, including “The English Patient,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley” and “Cold Mountain.” He also worked on many Merchant Ivory pictures, including James Ivory’s “The Remains of the Day” and “Howards End.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

What Maisie Knew – review

Maisie goes to Manhattan in this fine modern-day adaptation of Henry James's novel of irresponsible parenting

Henry James famously failed in his attempts to become a popular playwright in the 1890s and apparently never thought, like his friend Joseph Conrad, to engage with the new medium of the cinema. But starting some 30 years after his death, his fiction has reached a larger audience as a source of screenplays. Immediately after the second world war The Aspern Papers, shot in Hollywood on stylised Venetian sets, became the underrated The Lost Moment (the only film directed by the actor Martin Gabel) and was followed by William Wyler's highly regarded The Heiress (a version of Washington Square). Since then there have been a dozen or more James movies, adapting such complex books as The Golden Bowl, The Portrait of a Lady and The Wings of the Dove, and "the Master" has
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Room With a View’ Screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala Dies at 85

‘Room With a View’ Screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala Dies at 85
Screenwriter and novelist Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who collaborated for five decades with James Ivory and Ismail Merchant and won Oscars for “A Room With a View” and “Howards End,” died of a pulmonary disorder Wednesday in New York. She was 85.

Born in Germany, she moved to Britain with her family during the Nazi regime. After marrying an Indian architect in 1951 and moving to New Delhi, she began to write about her life there. She drew on her experiences for the novel “Heat and Dust” about a young woman living in India in the 1920s, which won the Booker Prize and was adapted for the 1983 Ivory film.

Prawer Jhabvala collaborated with Merchant and Ivory on films that were often literary adaptations, including “Mr. and Mrs. Bridge,” “The Remains of the Day,” “Quartet,” “The Golden Bowl” and “A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries.”

Merchant first called her in 1961 to ask the novelist,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Richard Robbins obituary

Composer who scored nearly every Merchant Ivory film from The Europeans onwards and was an integral part of the brand

The Guinness Book of Records notes that the 44-year collaboration between the Indian producer Ismail Merchant and the American director James Ivory was the longest in the history of cinema. They might equally have added the screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, who joined the duo from the start. And a member of Merchant Ivory Productions for almost as long was the composer Richard Robbins, who has died after suffering from Parkinson's disease, aged 71.

The Ivory-Robbins working partnership, which lasted over three decades, outdid in longevity such celebrated director-composer unions as Federico Fellini-Nino Rota, Michelangelo Antonioni-Giovanni Fusco and Alfred Hitchcock-Bernard Herrmann. Robbins scored nearly every Merchant Ivory production from The Europeans (1979) onwards, and was an integral part of the film company's brand.

The reason for the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Not following EastEnders' plotlines? Maybe some Bible study would help | John Sutherland

A huge plug was pulled on literature when school days stopped beginning with obligatory immersion in the Bible

Jennifer Robins's revelation that EastEnders' never-ending plotlines have been largely inspired by the Bible spawned headlines. "The prototype of every EastEnders story," proclaimed Robins, "can be traced back to one source: David and Goliath, Daniel in the Lions' Den, Samson and Delilah, Sodom and Gomorrah, the fall, all the Bible stories."

For anyone with a half-sensitive echo-meter the title of the soap itself gave the game away. Like John Steinbeck's novel, the half-buried allusion in the title is to Genesis: "Cain went out from the presence of the Lord, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the East of Eden" – or, in this case, the land to the east of Tower Bridge somewhere round the Isle of Dogs (which, in its turn, always brings to my mind to the line
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Barney Rosset, 1922 - 2012

  • MUBI
From John Gall, art director for Vintage and Anchor Books, comes word that legendary publisher and film distributor Barney Rosset has passed away at the age of 89. Gall points us to a lively profile by Louisa Thomas that ran in Newsweek in late 2008: "Rosset's publishing house, Grove Press, was a tiny company operating out of the ground floor of Rosset's brownstone when it published an obscure play called Waiting for Godot in 1954. By the time Beckett had won the Nobel Prize in 1969, Grove had become a force that challenged and changed literature and American culture in deep and lasting ways. Its impact is still evident — from the Che Guevara posters adorning college dorms to the canonical status of the house's once controversial authors. Rosset is less well known — but late in his life he is achieving some wider recognition. Last month, a black-tie crowd gave Rosset a standing ovation
See full article at MUBI »

'Downton Abbey' Costumes Are Recycled From Other Television Series and Movies

'Downton Abbey' Costumes Are Recycled From Other Television Series and Movies
It's enough to make the redoubtable Dowager Countess of Grantham blanch. Members of her aristocratic family wearing clothes previously worn by other people who are not related to them? Who might be -- gasp -- commoners? Perish the thought.

Yet that's exactly what's been happening on hit period drama "Downton Abbey" (Sundays, PBS; check local listings). Costume designer Susannah Buxton -- who won one of "Downton"s six Emmys in 2011 -- and her team have recycled and adapted several evening dresses, outfits and accessories from other television series and movies.

The fact has not escaped the attention of sharp-eyed viewers, who have been keeping tabs via the website RecycledMovieCostumes.com. This is not a new practice of course -- elaborate Edwardian costumes are expensive and time-consuming to make and may have only been worn once or twice, so period pieces often rent them.

Plus, leading actresses are usually a standard
See full article at Huffington Post »

'Downton Abbey' Costumes Are Recycled From Other Television Series and Movies

  • Aol TV.
'Downton Abbey' Costumes Are Recycled From Other Television Series and Movies
It's enough to make the redoubtable Dowager Countess of Grantham blanch. Members of her aristocratic family wearing clothes previously worn by other people who are not related to them? Who might be -- gasp -- commoners? Perish the thought.

Yet that's exactly what's been happening on hit period drama "Downton Abbey" (Sundays, PBS; check local listings). Costume designer Susannah Buxton -- who won one of "Downton"s six Emmys in 2011 -- and her team have recycled and adapted several evening dresses, outfits and accessories from other television series and movies.

The fact has not escaped the attention of sharp-eyed viewers, who have been keeping tabs via the website RecycledMovieCostumes.com. This is not a new practice of course -- elaborate Edwardian costumes are expensive and time-consuming to make and may have only been worn once or twice, so period pieces often rent them.

Plus, leading actresses are usually a standard
See full article at Aol TV. »

Madonna's W.E. and my 'Inconvenient Nazi' theory | Hadley Freeman

The new film about Wallis Simpson assembles all the bad movie cliches – and tries to downplay those Nazi skeletons

Here's a quote that Madonna is welcome , nay, advised, to put on the posters of her upcoming film W.E., a hagiography of the deeply unpleasant Wallis Simpson: "Hey! This movie isn't quite as mindblowingly terrible as you expect it to be!" Obviously, the film is inescapably ridiculous, predicated as it is on the idea that not only is some godawful social climber with notorious fascist leanings in any way relevant to women today, but that a modern 28-year-old woman who spends thousands of dollars of her husband's money in order to dress like Simpson is a sensitive feminist heroine as opposed to possibly certifiable.

It is a clumsily assembled jigsaw of bad movie cliches, like the Trailer for Every Oscar-Winning Movie Ever on YouTube, but funnier, if inadvertently so. Strands of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sheen Calmed By Fatherhood

  • WENN
Sheen Calmed By Fatherhood
Actor Michael Sheen has credited fatherhood with teaching him tolerance and helping to tame his temper.

The Queen star was reported to have punched actor Jeremy Northam on the set of 2000 movie The Golden Bowl after he allegedly insulted Sheen's then-girlfriend Kate Beckinsale.

But Sheen insists he has learned to be patient in trying situations since welcoming a daughter, Lily, with Beckinsale in 1999.

Speaking about his temper, he tells Britain's Seven magazine, "I think less so now... I hope it's not indiscriminate rage. I always feel it's justified. That (incident with Northam) was a long time ago. If I feel there is a situation where somebody is being very badly behaved or out of control or upsetting people needlessly, then I don't hold back. I try to sort that out, but that happens less and less...

"I think being a parent changes that. You can't go flying off the handle all the time. You have to learn to be patient and tolerant. You can't just walk away and you can't just shout. It's about people accepting your flaws as much as you accepting theirs... I don't hit anyone any more. I haven't hit anyone for a long time."

54th BFI London Film Festival Set To Have A Literary Flavour

The programme for this year’s festival has been announced and there are a number of literature-based films including the Opening Night Gala Never Let Me Go, Closing Night Gala 127 Hours and the provocative ‘Muslim punks’ film The Taqwacores.

With so many films in this year’s Lff programme having their origins in printed form, a discussion panel is also being held on 25th October, with a number of screenwriters discussing their adaptations in the Hollywood Reporter-sponsored event A Novel Idea: Adapting Books for the Screen.

Below a selection of the films with a literary connection screening at this year’s London Film Festival:

Literary Feature Films:

127 Hours; Dir. Danny Boyle – Gripping, adventurous film making and headline grabbing drama from Oscar winning director Danny Boyle, based on Aron Ralston’s book Between a Rock and A Hard Place (set for re-release in January).

The American; Dir. Anton CorbijnGeorge Clooney
See full article at FilmShaft.com »

Merchant Ivory faces courtroom drama with double lawsuit

Film company in wrangle over money as latest feature, The City of Your Final Destination, opens to mixed reviews

Once upon a time, Merchant Ivory was renowned for its hugely successful and elegantly understated studies of hearts breaking slowly and silently beneath layers of repression and period tailoring.

But five years after the death of its producer, Ismail Merchant, the firm is facing two unseemly lawsuits that have more in common with John Grisham than Em Forster, while its latest film has opened to lukewarm reviews after a financially fraught production.

Director James Ivory is embroiled in a legal battle over a $350,000 (£240,000) contract linked to The City of Your Final Destination, his first feature without the support of his original partner.

In a writ filed at the supreme court in New York, former Merchant Ivory producer Richard Hawley claims he has been airbrushed out of the credits for the film,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

There's Something About Uma

Craig here, asking you all (on her 40th birthday): where is Uma at?

Ah, Uma. Always the bridesmaid, never the bride. And despite actually being Tarantino's Bride twice last decade. What is it about Uma? She's widely known and adored by many, yet never seems to (quite) make it to the top of the A-list. The likes of Helen Hunt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Charlize Theron, Reese Witherspoon, Renée Zellweger, Jennifer Connelly, Angelina Jolie and Hilary Swank - all peers and contemporaries - have bagged themselves Oscars in the last thirteen-or-so years. The simple question is: where's Uma's gold?

She's one of the most uniquely beautiful actresses working, but nowadays, more so than in the early '90s, she doesn't often tend to get the recognition come awards season, or even appear on any of those Sexiest Hollywood Stars lists that crop up year-on-year anymore (although, is this really a fair
See full article at FilmExperience »

Anthony Hopkins touts character over effects

Anthony Hopkins touts character over effects
What's the downside to digital special effects and 3D movies overtaking theaters? One, at least, is that fans may lose sight of actors like Anthony Hopkins.

At 72 years old, the Oscar winner says offers of work have slowed in recent years, and he finds roles in movies such as his current "The City of Your Final Destination," to be most enjoyable because films like it "are very quiet and internal."

That is not to say that Sir Anthony doesn't care to work with big action and special effects. He performed in recent horror tale "The Wolfman" and in the computer-animated "Beowulf."

But with big-budget movies like "Avatar" or "Clash of the Titans" dominating major studio releases -- movies in which the acting is done in front of greenscreens, and sets and stunts are digitally added into the films -- character-driven dramas such as "City of Your Final Destination" get less
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Kate Beckinsale Braves The Freezing Cold For 'Whiteout'

'I had not been in minus-50-degree weather before, and it was surprisingly cold,' the actress says.

By Larry Carroll, with reporting by Silas Lesnick

Kate Beckinsale in 'Whiteout'

Photo: Warner Bros.

Los Angeles — Although she was born into a respected British acting family and got her big break in an adaptation of William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing," Kate Beckinsale has always been blessed — or cursed — with a knack for genre films. While films like "The Golden Bowl," "Nothing but the Truth" and "Laurel Canyon" have underperformed, the "Underworld" films have coupled with "Van Helsing" to make her the queen of fanged, sexy cinema.

This week, Beckinsale returns with "Whiteout," an ice-cold thriller based on the beloved 1998 comic book of the same name. Although she's traded in her leather bodysuit for a burly winter coat, geeks will still drool over her take on U.S.
See full article at MTV Movie News »

A slow boat to anywhere

I came across a statistic the other day that claimed only about ten percent of Americans have traveled outside their country. There is no reason for this. The recession is not an explanation; the survey was taken back when Bear, Sterns was still paying its rent. This is the richest and least-traveled of "developed" nations, and I have a feeling many Americans thank heaven every day that they have never had occasion to leave it.

But this will not be a column boasting about my travels to every continent except Australia and Antarctica, and how as a wee lad I saved up my 75-cent an hour salary and boarded a DC-6 that took me to London by way of Gander, Reykjavík and Aberdeen. No, not even though I just googled Antarctica and this is all I found on the page: "stu is a legend and the good guy has cheap sales.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

O, Synecdoche, my Synecdoche!

Fair warning: I begin with a parable, continue with vast generalizations, finally get around to an argument with Entertainment Weekly, and move on to Greek gods, "I Love Lucy" and a house on fire.

The parable, The lodestars of John Doe's life are his wife, his children, his boss, his mistress, and his pastor. There are more, but these will do. He expects his wife to be grateful for his loyalty. His children to accept him as a mentor. His boss to value him as a worker. His mistress to praise him as a sex machine. His pastor to note his devotion. These are the roles he has assigned them, and for the most part they play them.

In their own lives, his wife feels he has been over-rewarded for his loyalty, since she has done all the heavy lifting. His children don't understand why there are so many stupid rules.
See full article at Roger Ebert's Blog »

Sheen + Northam Fought Over Beckinsale

  • WENN
Fists flew on the set of period film The Golden Bowl when The Queen star Michael Sheen and fellow Brit Jeremy Northam fell out over then-new mum Kate Beckinsale.

Protective Sheen, the father of Beckinsale's daughter Lily, had dropped by the set of the 2000 film to visit his then-girlfriend and was taken aback when Northam started shouting at her.

Sheen didn't hold back and stepped up to defend upset Beckinsale - by thumping Northam.

Beckinsale recalls, "I was so mortified. I thought, 'Now Michael's going to jail, and I'm going to have to bake that cake and put the file in it.'"

But the actress admits the warring men quickly patched up their differences.

She adds, "It all became very sort of British and gentlemanly between those two, with handshaking all round."

Love And War

Love And War
On-screen lovers Jeremy Northam and Kate Beckinsale were reportedly feuding enemies while making their new film. And the pair's arguments apparently became so heated that they spilled over into physical violence, on the set of the Merchant/Ivory adaptation of Henry James' novel Golden Bowl, The (2000). A film technician said, "It all started when Kate decided to drop a line from the text. Jeremy started shouting at her, complaining that she'd ruined his performance. He was so furious that he followed Kate to her caravan and started screaming abuse." Kate's husband became angered by Jeremy's actions and allegedly hit him. The period drama is due out this October.
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