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(1999)

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Guilt as Madness: An Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne

  • MUBI
Photo by Darren HughesThe Unknown Girl opens with a handheld close up of Dr. Jenny (Adèle Haenel) examining a patient. “Listen,” she says, handing her stethoscope to Julien (Olivier Bonnaud), a medical student who is interning at her clinic. Never ones to shy away from a glaring metaphor, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne announce in that brief exchange their film’s driving thematic and formal concerns. When Jenny later learns that her decision to not allow a late-night visitor into the clinic might have contributed to the young woman’s death, she puts her skills and training to new purpose: listening for clues that might help solve the murder.The Unknown Girl differs from the Dardennes’ previous fiction films only in its more obviously generic plotting. This seems to have contributed to the uncharacteristically mixed reviews that greeted the film at its 2016 Cannes premiere, where it was faulted for failing to
See full article at MUBI »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

  • Indiewire
79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

'The Brigade' ('Les Hommes du feu'): Film Review

'The Brigade' ('Les Hommes du feu'): Film Review
A full-blown immersion inside a working French fire station, The Brigade (Les Hommes du feu) deserves credit for the nearly documentary way it captures the life-risking and life-saving quotidian of a squad of firefighters based in the Gallic southwest.

But as a dramatic thriller, this lackluster effort from writer-director Pierre Jolivet (The Night Watchmen) suffers from generic storytelling and a very telefilm-style sheen — to the point that it often feels less like a movie than like a fictionalized training video. A decent cast lead by Roschdy Zem (Point Blank) and Emilie Dequenne (Rosetta) should give this StudioCanal release a...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Film Review: ‘This Is Our Land’

Film Review: ‘This Is Our Land’
The rise of nationalist groups and xenophobia is once again a global issue, lending “This Is Our Land” a relevance well beyond the specific French political trends it fictionalizes. It also lends appeal to audiences beyond the European ones catered to in territorial releases earlier this year, before the recent high-profile French elections. The latter saw Marine Le Pen’s far-right National Front party take some losses that reassured many observers. But that outcome wasn’t guaranteed when Belgian writer-director Lucas Belvaux crafted his drama, which is loosely based on a novel by co-scenarist Jerome Leroy.

Here, a figure very much like Le Pen leads a supposedly kinder-gentler 2.0 version of the extremist bloc her father founded, its populist makeover encompassing the drafting of a hitherto apolitical working-class nurse as a local puppet candidate. Though marred by minor narrative-logic flaws, “Our Land” provides an insightful, non-hyperbolic perspective on Western extremism by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Liege Becomes Burgeoning Hub for Belgian Cinema

Four times smaller than Brussels and with a population of around 700,000, the Francophone city of Liège has emerged as a major hub in the Belgian filmmaking industry. Bordering Germany and the Netherlands, Belgium’s easternmost city has been steadily growing its production and post-production infrastructure over the past several years, playing host to more than 41 shoots in 2016, as well some the most dynamic and consequential production shingles in the country.

This was not always the case. When native sons Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (winners of the Palme d’Or for the “Rosetta” and “The Child”) opened Les Films du Fleuve in 1994 to finance their own films, they were pretty much the only game in town, alongside Les Films de la Passerelle, a non-fiction outlet devoted to socially minded documentaries.

A series of public reforms changed all that. In January 2000, the Walloon government introduced Wallimage, a regional investment fund with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Raid: Special Unit,’ ‘Alibi.com,’ ‘Paris Opera’ Fire Up UniFrance Rendez-Vous

Paris –“Raid: Special Unit,” “Alibi.com,” and “Opera” looked to be among favourite titles at the 19th UniFrance Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, the annual Gallic film market attended by France’s sales agents and around 500 foreign distributors.

Based out of the Place d’Opera, one of Paris’ great grand hotels, the biggest national film showcase in Europe also saw sales on Elle Driver’’s “If I Were a Boy,” and Other Angle’s “Don’t Tell Her” and good word on “You Choose!” sold, like “Raid,” by Pathé .

Most major sales companies will take days if not weeks not close sales on negotiations broached at the Rendez-Vous; the initial reaction, however, is that, with Omar Sy starrer “Two is Family”earning a first-week $1.6 million in Germany off a Jan. 7 bow, the 2017 Rendez-Vous served up a stronger batch of comedies, its main export staple, than in 2017, while its buzz titles prescribed a wider gamut than last year,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

UniFrance Rendez-Vous: Studiocanal Takes International on ‘Big Bad Fox,’ ‘L’Ecole Buissonnière’ (Exclusive)

Paris – Studiocanal, one of Europe’s biggest film-tv companies, has acquired international rights to Benjamin Renner’s animated movie “Big Bad Fox and Other Tales,” from Didier Brunner’s Folivari, as well as live-action period drama “L’Ecole buissonnière,” the latest film from “Belle et Sebastien” director Nicolas Vanier.

The two titles join Studiocanal’s biggest French movie slate in recent years, which is to be presented to buyers Friday at the 2017 UniFrance Rendez-Vous with French Cinema in Paris.

“The Rendez-Vous is a must-attend event for buyers of French films. We want to take advantage of that,” said Anna Marsh, Studiocanal head of international film sales.

Also on Studiocanal’s lineup are Vincent Cassel-starrer “Gauguin”; French vineyard-set “Back To Burgundy,” from Cedric Klapisch (“L’Auberge espagnole”); “Elementary,” toplining Sara Forestier (“The Name of Love”); and teen fantasy survival thriller “Alone,” from “It Boy’s” David Moreau, which will screen at the Rendez-Vous.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

No-Home Movie: Emotional Dislocation in ‘Happy Together’ and ‘Moonlight’

From January 4-9, New York’s Film Society of Lincoln Center will run a series titled Illuminating Moonlight, featuring works that inspired Barry JenkinsMoonlight and were handpicked by the director himself. Included in this lineup is Wong Kar-wai’s Happy Together, which makes perfect sense. Wong’s film, like Moonlight, tells of gay love and communicates its characters’ desires through both dreamy impressionism and a genre-spanning soundtrack. But these two are related in another, less obvious way, and this connection has to do with the contexts in which they were made. Happy Together premiered on May 17, 1997, less than two months before the handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China, while Moonlight debuted on September 2, 2016, right as cultural backlash against liberal progressivism reached its greatest intensity in the unexpectedly massive show of support for Republican Presidential nominee Donald Trump. Hitting screens as their respective societies were on the brink of potentially cataclysmic change,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Belgium’s Best Foreign Oscar Pick Is ‘The Ardennes,’ Not the Dardennes

Belgium’s Best Foreign Oscar Pick Is ‘The Ardennes,’ Not the Dardennes
Yet again, Belgium has passed over the latest film from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, “The Unknown Girl,” which played in competition at Cannes and will screen at the upcoming Toronto International Film Festival. Instead, Belgium is submitting rookie director Robin Pront’s “The Ardennes,” a robbery-gone-wrong thriller that debuted at last year’s Tiff in the Discovery program and has been nominated for 10 Ensor Awards (September 16). It also made the shortlist for the European Film Awards.

The last Dardenne brothers film to be submitted by Belgium, “Two Days, One Night,” was not nominated (although Marion Cotillard did earn a Best Actress nomination); nor were submissions “Rosetta,” “The Son,” or “The Child.” (Many believe that if Belgium had selected the Dardennes’ more accessible Golden-Globe-nominated “Kid with a Bike,” it would have landed a final-five slot.)

In “The Ardennes,” a brutal robbery goes wrong. One of two thieves escapes, leaving his brother behind.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Belgium’s Best Foreign Oscar Pick Is ‘The Ardennes,’ Not the Dardennes

  • Indiewire
Belgium’s Best Foreign Oscar Pick Is ‘The Ardennes,’ Not the Dardennes
Yet again, Belgium has passed over the latest film from Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, “The Unknown Girl,” which played in competition at Cannes and will screen at the upcoming Toronto International Film Festival. Instead, Belgium is submitting rookie director Robin Pront’s “The Ardennes,” a robbery-gone-wrong thriller that debuted at last year’s Tiff in the Discovery program and has been nominated for 10 Ensor Awards (September 16). It also made the shortlist for the European Film Awards.

The last Dardenne brothers film to be submitted by Belgium, “Two Days, One Night,” was not nominated (although Marion Cotillard did earn a Best Actress nomination); nor were submissions “Rosetta,” “The Son,” or “The Child.” (Many believe that if Belgium had selected the Dardennes’ more accessible Golden-Globe-nominated “Kid with a Bike,” it would have landed a final-five slot.)

In “The Ardennes,” a brutal robbery goes wrong. One of two thieves escapes, leaving his brother behind.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Dardennes’ Next Film Will Be A Drama About Islamic Terrorism

  • The Playlist
While the films of acclaimed Belgian sibling filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (“Two Days, One Night,” “The Son,” “Rosetta“) have generally glanced against social issues, their films have never been ripped from headlines. But it sounds like that’s about to change as the pair gear up their followup to this year’s “The Unknown Girl.” Read […]

The post The Dardennes’ Next Film Will Be A Drama About Islamic Terrorism appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

  • Indiewire
The Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama
The Dardenne Brothers always write and direct their films at a steady clip, often releasing their films in three- or four-year intervals. Their latest film “The Unknown Girl,” about a doctor who sets out to find the identity of an unknown young woman who died after she was refused surgery, premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Now, Variety reports that Luc Dardenne says that the duo are set to make their next film, which will be about the rise of terrorism in Europe. “We are writing the script now, and hope to shoot it in Belgium by the fall of next year,” says the Dardenne brother.

Read More: Cannes Review: ‘The Unknown Girl’ is Dardenne Brothers Doing a Detective Movie

Luc Dardenne is currently at the 20th Lima Film Festival as they are paying tribute to his film work. As part of the tribute, Lima is screening a section of the Dardennes’ films,
See full article at Indiewire »

Dardenne Brothers to Make Terrorism-Themed Drama (Exclusive)

Dardenne Brothers to Make Terrorism-Themed Drama (Exclusive)
Lima – Belgian filmmaking brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne are developing a drama about the rise of terrorism in Europe. “We are writing the script now, and hope to shoot it in Belgium by the fall of next year,” said Luc Dardenne, to whom the 20th Lima Film Festival is paying tribute. The still untitled project dovetails with the filmmaking duo’s penchant for stories about the working class and marginalized fringes of society.

As part of their tribute, Lima is screening a selection of the brothers’ most iconic pics, including their Cannes Palme d’Or winners “Rosetta” and “L’Enfant” as well as “La Promesse” and Cannes 2011 Grand Prix winner “The Kid with a Bike.”

“I’m very honored to be here to receive this homage,” said Dardenne, who is visiting Lima for the first time.

Meanwhile, the brothers are co-producing $1.1 million dramedy “Drole de Pere” (roughly translated to “Funny
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Dardennes Brothers Have Re-Edited ‘The Unknown Girl’

The Dardennes Brothers Have Re-Edited ‘The Unknown Girl’
Paris — Traditionally applauded by international critics, Belgian directors Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne took note of the critical feedback which their medical drama “The Unknown Girl” earned at Cannes and decided to re-edit the feature before its theatrical release, Variety has confirmed.

The brothers, who have won the Palme d’Or twice (for “L’enfant” and “Rosetta”), said they decided to make changes to the film following the world premiere in competition at Cannes.

The edited version of “The Unknown Girl” is seven minutes shorter and includes as many as 32 changes, according to ScreenDaily which first reported the story.

“The Unknown Girl” stars Adele Haenel as a doctor who sets off to uncover the identity of a patient who died after she was refused surgery.

The movie was produced by the Dardennes brothers’ Les Films du Fleuve, Savage Film and Paris-based Archipel 35. Wild Bunch handles international sales on “The Unknown Girl
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dardennes Re-Editing Cannes Entry "Girl"

Belgian directors Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne ("L'enfant," "Rosetta," "Two Days, One Night") are normally critical darlings, but the pair scored a lot of harsh words for their medical drama"The Unknown Girl" when it was unveiled at Cannes in May.

As a result of that derision, Variety reports that the pair are set to re-edit the feature before its theatrical release. The new version is seven minutes shorter and includes as many as thirty-two changes.

In the film, Adele Haenel plays a doctor who sets off to uncover the identity of a patient who died after she was refused surgery. Les Films du Fleuve, Savage Film and Archipel 35 produced the feature which Sundance Selects will release in the United States.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

The Dardennes Have Re-Edited ‘The Unknown Girl’ For Theatrical Release

If you don’t like the result of something — or if others don’t — do it again. That seems to be the approach by directing brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne with their most recent feature The Unknown Girl, which rounded Cannes with mixed reviews, including our own. After a slew of successes — including Two Days, One Night, The Promise, The Kid With A Bike, and Rosetta — The Unknown Girl stands out rather glaringly as an anomaly for the pair.

Screen Daily reports that the Palme d’Or-winning duo sat down with their editor to make minor tweaks to The Unknown Girl, only to realize a more extensive revision felt right. Now, 32 cuts have been made to the film about a young doctor who is propelled to uncover the identity of a patient who died after refusing treatment. This new cut will run seven minutes shorter — the original cut ran 1 hour
See full article at The Film Stage »

Dardenne Brothers’ First Cannes Win Opened Door for Belgian Cinema

Dardenne Brothers’ First Cannes Win Opened Door for Belgian Cinema
When Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne’s “Rosetta” snatched the Palme D’Or from under Pedro Almodóvar’s nose in 1999 — the Spaniard was considered the hot favorite with “All About My Mother” that year — it was one of the biggest upsets in Cannes history. At the time, the David Cronenberg-led jury was accused of favoring, and possibly even patronizing, the underdog, just to snub commercial European arthouse cinema.

Fast-forward 17 years and not only are the Dardennes eyeing the prospect of an unprecedented three-time win, but Belgium’s Wallonia region has become a fertile breeding ground for talent, with a star system that has brought us Benoît Poelvoorde, François Damiens, Cécile de France and Bouli Lanners.

Today, the importance of “Rosetta” to the French-speaking film industry cannot be overstated.

“There was hardly an industry in Wallonia before this amazing Palme d’Or win,” says Philippe Reynaert, CEO of funding body Wallimage
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: A-z Films Takes Wild Bunch Trio (Exclusive)

Cannes: Underscoring the importance of the Cannes festival, both its market and selection, for foreign distributor buys, Antoine Zeind’s A-z Films has acquired three 2016 Cannes Competition films: Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation,” Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s “The Unknown Girl” and Cristi Puiu’s “Sierra Nevada.”

Based out of Quebec, Zeind’s distribution-production company has also taken “The Red Turtle,” which world premieres in Un Certain Regard.

Wild Bunch sells, finances and sometimes co-produces three of these titles: “Graduation,” “Girl” and “The Red Turtle.” “Sierra Nevada” is repped by Elle Driver, a Wild Bunch company, a sign of A-z Films’ strong connection with France.

The latest from Mungiu, whose “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” won Cannes’ 2007 Palme d’Or, the consecration of the so-called Romanian New Wave, “Graduation” is a father-daughter ethical drama turning on a small-town doctor’s ambitions for his clever daughter to win a scholarship outside Romania.

From Belgium’s Dardenne brothers,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011 - winners and losers

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011 - winners and losers
As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011

Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011
As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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