Lincoln Hallett is on trial. His chief backer is Tim Creegan, a political boss. Judge Calder, who is to try the case, is an especially upright man. He is in love with Hallett's daughter ... See full summary »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Judge Calder
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Tim Creegan - a Political Exponent
Charles Eldridge ...
Lincoln Hallett - the Railroad President
Hazel Neason ...
Rose Hallett - the Accused's Daughter
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Storyline

Lincoln Hallett is on trial. His chief backer is Tim Creegan, a political boss. Judge Calder, who is to try the case, is an especially upright man. He is in love with Hallett's daughter Rose. Hallett and Creegan are afraid of the judge's decision. Creegan insists that they must bribe him. He tries and fails. Then he advises Hallett to use his daughter as a weapon, making her believe that her father is the victim of a conspiracy. Innocently she tries to persuade him to decide in favor of her father. He refuses and insists upon doing his duty. Later on, she overhears Creegan and some confederates plotting to abduct and perhaps murder Calder. She sees that she has been deceived and at once goes off to warn her lover. She gets there in time. Creegan's tool, Harkin, who brings a decoy message to Calder, is arrested with his accomplices, and turns state's evidence, to Creegan's horror and dismay. Judge Calder turns up in court the next morning, alive and well. Creegan is arrested for ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

5 February 1912 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dommeren  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

One of the most noticeable qualities of the picture is its quiet dignity
5 September 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An artistic melodrama of political life, it has much quality in its plot, its acting, its general stage management and its photography. The plot is simple and natural and the story is carried forward speedily with no flat places and with a steady deepening of interest. Perhaps, taking it as a picture of life, and it is very convincing, its most interesting character is the astute machine boss (played by Brooke). We see him confronted by a knotty problem. He must save the railroad president (played by Eldridge) who had broken the law and who was to be tried before a judge (played by Costello) who is known to be just. His first attempt to suborn the judge fails and he then craftily makes use of the fact that the accused man's daughter (played by Miss Neason) is engaged to the judge. But his scheme fails completely by the merest chance. The other three characters were also intelligently and clearly shown and were very interesting. One of the most noticeable qualities of the picture is its quiet dignity. It gets this largely from the fact that it is one whole, and not a broken series of situations. Scene follows scene without padding or complication of any kind. The center of interest keeps its balance, so to speak, as it is handed from scene to scene. There is also little suggestion of stage craft in it. Every scene at once throws the interest to the center where it belongs and keeps it there regardless of other considerations. We don't notice the furnishings much; nothing is obtruded; everything seems just to have happened. It takes great pains to arrange naturally. The photographs also are natural or are the kind that seem so. There's no doubt about its being a feature. It is a very good melodrama. - The Moving Picture World, February 17, 1912


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