5.3/10
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356 user 118 critic

In the Cut (2003)

New York City writing professor, Frannie Avery, has an affair with a police detective, who is investigating the murder of a beautiful young woman in her neighborhood.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
4,978 ( 501)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Michael Nuccio ...
Frannie's Young Father (as Micheal Nuccio)
Allison Nega ...
Young Father's Fiancee (as Alison Nega)
Dominick Aries ...
Susan Gardner ...
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Daniel T. Booth ...
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Frannie's Student (as Yaani King)
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Frannie's Student (as Zack Wegner)
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Storyline

Frannie Avery is a New York City inner city high school English teacher, whose passion is collecting words and phrases that interest her, either because of their meaning and/or just because of the way they sound. The way that she and her paternal half sister Pauline Avery, her closest confidante, deal with men and sex has largely been affected by their father, who is working on marrying wife number five. Frannie thinks about sex more than she has it. Her lack of a sex life is further exacerbated by being the object of obsession of James Graham, a man with who she had a few casual dates and two sexual encounters, which has made her even more cautious. This complete experience is why she has a somewhat inappropriate, albeit non-sexual relationship with Cornelius Webb, one of her students. She eventually embarks on a sexual relationship with NYPD Homicide Detective Giovanni Malloy, who, along with his partner Detective Ritchie Rodriguez, are investigating the murder of a young woman, ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Everything you know about desire is dead wrong.

Genres:

Mystery | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong sexuality including explicit dialogue, nudity, graphic crime scenes and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

31 October 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

En carne viva  »

Box Office

Budget:

$12,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$97,625 (USA) (26 October 2003)

Gross:

$4,750,602 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Sound Mix:

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Color:

(fantasy sequences) (Sepiatone)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Costume Department bought the entire wardrobe from the production remains of The Job (2001), a recently cancelled television show, for four hundred dollars. See more »

Goofs

When Franny sits down with Cornelius the first time and she opens her notebook, the "new word" he gives her is already written there, before he tells her. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Pauline: What does "broccoli" mean"?
Frannie: Depends on the context. Pubic hair or marijuana. It's a noun.
Pauline: And "Virginia"?
Frannie: Vagina. As in, "He penetrated her Virginia with a hammer".
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Crazy Credits

Filmed 100% in New York city. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Imagine Me & You (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

I Think I Love You
Written by Tony Romeo
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

My extended review of the film
19 January 2005 | by (Perth, Australia) – See all my reviews

Many people out there do not understand the difference between the Best Picture and Best Director Oscar. After all, if the director is responsible for making sure all the elements mix well together, then surely Best Director should be the same as Best Picture? Well that is not quite the case, as far as I understand it. The writing of the film, or the story itself, is at least the main thing that a director does not have complete control of. There are other elements too of course. But the reason why it is so hard to explain the difference to people is that it is rare to come across a film that is well directed but nothing much else. However, 'In the Cut' is an example of such a film.

The plot is a thriller about some serial killer who is killing young women. Sound familiar yet? However there is a (pseudo) erotic romance involved too. Our protagonist is an outgoing female, but yet one with weaknesses. The storyline revolves around a primarily sexual relationship that she starts with a detective investigating the case, however all along she suspects that he is the killer, because she saw someone with the same tattoo receiving oral sex from one of the murder victims. I won't reveal the rest of the plot, which may sound slightly original, but yet I can reassure you it is quite hackneyed in the execution.

The film is based on a novel written by Susannah Moore, which I am yet to read, and after seeing the film adaptation, I am in no mood to. Campion takes to writing the screenplay, but helped along by Moore. In 1993, Campion did a superb job writing 'The Piano', for which she received a well-deserved Oscar. The characters in the film were all interesting and well developed, and the story was no difficulty to understand. It was also quite original. The material for this movie however revolves around a familiar plot that has a thriller element. More time in the script is dedicated therefore towards the thriller – and romance – aspects of the story, and less towards the drama. That's not to say that the characters are poorly developed or anything, but it does not help. The main problem with the writing of the film is the story itself. It has so many familiar elements and at times it is predictable and clichéd.

The acting is not much better than ordinary either. Ryan has a few good moments, but is often over-the-top. The rest of the cast is, well, satisfactory, but nothing special, give or take Kevin Bacon. However Bacon's character is perhaps the most questionable one of the lot. So if the writing and acting in the film is ordinary, can it be a great film? Not really. How then, one might wonder, is it well directed? Campion is a very good director. She knows exactly how to direct a film to give it the right atmosphere and make it look good. In the Cut is one of the best-looking thrillers I've seen of this decade. As in 'The Portrait of a Lady', Campion demonstrates an acute eye for colour and light in the film. The execution is very polished. On a surface level it does not look like a cheap Hollywood film. It does not look like a vehicle for Ryan or any of her co-stars. Kudos especially goes to Campion's vision of the flashbacks used in the film, which are reminiscent of the vignettes Kidman's worldwide voyages in 'The Portrait of a Lady'. Even Campion's use of black and white aids the visual style.

This is certainly one of the most unique films I have come across, but I don't say that in an overly positive manner. It is a very good-looking film, and ignoring camera angles and editing techniques, it still looks very solid on a visual scope. There is plenty to admire about Campion's direction of the film, but under this polished surface that Campion has created lies an ordinary, predictable, clichéd and only semi-interesting thriller. It is a film worth seeing to admire Campion's craft as a director, but the film is otherwise rather unrewarding, though it surely will still keep one watching until maybe the last ten minutes.


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