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The Madame Gambles (1951)

Madame Louise (original title)
Employess of a dress shop battle with a crooked gambler to get their jobs back.

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(screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Richard Hearne ...
...
...
Hilda Bayley ...
Doris Rogers ...
Richard Gale ...
Lt. Edwards
...
Vic Wise ...
John Powe ...
Dumbo
Robert Adair ...
Bookmaker
...
Cafe Proprietress (as Anita Bolster)
...
Trout's Clerk
Pauline Johnson ...
Pearl
Mavis Greenaway ...
Mannequin
Pat Raphael ...
Mannequin
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Storyline

Employess of a dress shop battle with a crooked gambler to get their jobs back.

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based on play | See All (1) »

Genres:

Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

1 October 1951 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

The Madame Gambles  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Opening credits: The Characters and events depicted in this film are fictitious, and any similarity to actual persons living or dead or events is purely coincidental. See more »

Goofs

During Mr. Pastry's bicycle chase sequence near the end of the film, the shadows lengthen and shorten randomly. See more »

Connections

Version of BBC Sunday-Night Theatre: Madame Louise (1956) See more »

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User Reviews

 
When Mr. Pastry was in fashion
7 July 2015 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

This farce, previously a great success on the stage for Robertson Hare and Alfred Drayton, is tailored for Richard Hearne's good-natured, kindly character, Mr. Pastry, with Garry Marsh in Drayton's role as the bullying, blustering, bookie who takes over a high class dress salon (not that you would notice from this) when its owner, Madame Louise, defaults on her gambling debts.

Hearne, a trained acrobat, whose only rival in the art of falling over was Norman Wisdom, was a first class comedian with international appeal, who, had he been born fifteen or twenty years earlier, could have become one of the great stars of the silent era in the manner of Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton. As it was, his heyday was in the ephemeral world of live television and low budget films such as this, though he remains a fondly remembered figure. Pity that the cramped sets here hardly provide an adequate stage for his talents.

Quite funny in its madcap way, this also involves Marsh hiding from a trio of comic gangsters (including Charles Farrell and Vic Wise) and his fearsome battle-axe of a wife; an amusing performance from Doris Rogers, whom I've never seen in anything else. And there's also the Pastry designed three-in-one costume, modelled by sweet and charming co-star Petula Clark, leading to several unfortunate misunderstandings with her boyfriend.


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