IMDb > The Man Who Stole the Sun (1979)

The Man Who Stole the Sun (1979) More at IMDbPro »Taiyô wo nusunda otoko (original title)


Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Leonard Schrader (screenplay) &
Kazuhiko Hasegawa (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Man Who Stole the Sun on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 October 1980 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A misfit high-school science teacher decides to build his own atomic bomb. He steals isotopes from a... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
8 wins & 7 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
User Reviews:
The criticisms of this film are ridiculous. See more (10 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)
Bunta Sugawara ... Inspector Yamashita
Kenji Sawada ... Makoto Kido
Kimiko Ikegami ... Zero Sawai
Kazuo Kitamura ... Tanaka, the director of the National Police Agency
Shigeru Kôyama ... Nakayama
Kei Satô ... Dr. Ichikawa
Yûnosuke Itô ... Bus Hijacker
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Eimei Esumi ... Egawa
Hiroshi Gojo ... Identikit Officer
Tatsuya Hamaguchi
Hajime Hoshi
Junichi Hosokawa
Akinobu Imamura
Yukiko Inoue
Yûdai Ishiyama ... Detective Ishikawa
Kazuhiro Iwamoto
Rika Kayama ... Student
Morio Kazama ... Asai
Hôsei Komatsu ... Loan Officer
Toshizô Kudô
Kiyoshi Kurosawa ... Suspect on tv news
Kôjirô Kusanagi ... Technician of Phone Company
Yasuyoshi Masuda
Ken Mizoguchi
Yutaka Mizutani ... Police Officer
Midori Mori
Tatsuya Mori
Yôji Mori
Satoru Nabe
Masaharu Nagai
Toshiyuki Nishida ... Loan Collector
Daisuke Odera
Takayuki Ohira
Tomokazu Sakamoto
Ryôichi Satô
Jôji Sawada
Yûji Shikamata
Saburô Shôji ... Detective Mizushima
Nanako Takahashi
Isao Takanami
Chiaki Takayama ... Apartment Manager
Eigo Taniguchi
Kyôko Togawa ... Student
Masao Ueda
Michiyo Yamazoe ... Student
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Directed by
Kazuhiko Hasegawa 
 
Writing credits
Leonard Schrader (screenplay) (as Renâdo Shureidâ) &
Kazuhiko Hasegawa (screenplay)

Leonard Schrader (story) (as Renâdo Shureidâ)

Produced by
Kei Ijichi .... producer
Mataichirô Yamamoto .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Takayuki Inoue 
 
Cinematography by
Tatsuo Suzuki  (as Daruma Suzuki)
 
Film Editing by
Akira Suzuki 
 
Production Design by
Yoshinaga Yoko'o 
 
Set Decoration by
Tomoyuki Maruo 
Kazunori Sawaji 
Masumi Suzuki 
Osamu Yamaguchi 
 
Costume Design by
Masami Saito 
Minoru Yamada 
 
Production Management
Yuya Furuta .... assistant unit manager
Kiyoshi Kurosawa .... unit production manager
Yasuyuki Ohtani .... unit production manager
Tsutomu Yamamoto .... assistant unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Koji Enokido .... assistant director
Takeo Moriyasu .... second assistant director
Shinji Sômai .... assistant director
Yoshiro Takahashi .... second assistant director
Hironari Yano .... second assistant director
 
Sound Department
Kenichi Benitani .... sound recordist
Mineharu Kitamura .... assistant sound
Yoshio Kojima .... sound effects
Toshio Nakano .... assistant sound
Minoru Nobuoka .... assistant sound
Saburo Takahashi .... sound mixer
 
Stunts
Ryôjirô Nishimoto .... stunt coordinator
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Takashi Anpo .... still photographer
Takehiko Fukae .... assistant camera
Fumikazu Fukumoto .... additional camera operator
Akihiro Itô .... assistant camera
Seisaku Kimura .... lighting technician
Kazuya Kobayashi .... lighting technician
Hideo Kumagai .... gaffer
Toyomichi Kurita .... assistant camera
Tsunekazu Kurosawa .... assistant camera
Kenichi Nagano .... lighting technician
Yôhei Nagasaka .... still photographer
Kiyoshi Nishiura .... additional camera operator
Riyoji Shigeta .... assistant camera
Makoto Watanabe .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
Akio Kawashima .... assistant editor
Yoshio Kitazawa .... assistant editor
Yoshiyuki Okuhara .... negative cutter
 
Music Department
Katsu Hoshi .... arranger
Osamu Onodera .... music selection
Hidenori Taga .... score producer
 
Other crew
Haruko Imamura .... script supervisor
Emiko Ninagawa .... wigs supplier
Yasuaki Sakuraba .... publicist
Kimi Yoneyama .... wigs supplier
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Taiyô wo nusunda otoko" - Japan (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
147 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.96 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Canada:R (Ontario) | Singapore:PG

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The song Makoto is humming while preparing to open up the plutonium capsule is the theme song for 'Tetsuwan Atom: Uchû no yûsha (1964)'.See more »
Quotes:
[Writing a long, complex formula]
Makoto Kido:...and thus, acidic plutonium becomes plutonium metal. Any questions?
Student:Yeah... so, making atomic bombs is going to be included on the exam?
Makoto Kido:...the exam?
Other Student:Well, if it isn't, could we move on to something else, please? We're the only class still on this!
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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The criticisms of this film are ridiculous., 18 August 2013
Author: ebossert from United States

A highschool science teacher decides to make an atomic bomb in his apartment. The opening half hour of this movie is erratic, making it difficult to predict where the story is going or what will ultimately happen. A nice blend of dark thrills and black humor is what makes this one special. It juxtaposes tonal shifts in convincing fashion. The protagonist is an unorthodox mad scientist who is very likable and charismatic. There are some very interesting sequences in this, like the lengthy plutonium experiments and bomb construction. Most of the film is realistic but even the more wildly, intentionally unrealistic moments are entertaining in their craziness. There are also some subtleties that one will miss if they are not paying close attention. Performances are great and the ending is ballsy.

Some of the criticisms that I've read for this film have annoyed me. It's like most of the negative reviews are coming from people who are demanding that every element of the film be easily categorized into tiny little boxes of familiarity and traditional filmmaking styles. Take the protagonist's philosophy as one example. We get a very good feel for his character throughout the film. He's an unhinged yet likable science teacher, but according to some critics he's apparently not "properly developed" because he doesn't come out and tell everyone exactly why he made the bomb. Well, why does he need a reason anyway? I thought one of the points of the film was that he didn't know what to do with the bomb after he made it. He even asks the radio DJ to poll her listeners so he can get some ideas! Come on, people. Did you really want him to make a long-winded nationalistic or philosophical speech at the end? I'm glad he didn't. In fact, I find it thought-provoking and refreshing that I have difficulty identifying exactly why he did it. And guess what? That was probably the WHOLE POINT OF THE MOVIE!

Another ridiculous criticism is one of those oft-parroted dumb ones that I'll never understand. Due to the black humor and unrealistic moments, there are tonal shifts throughout. Of course, viewers who need their movies carbon-copied in Hollywood fashion will have a problem with this because "the movie doesn't know what it wants to be." Yeesh! Okay, do you really want every movie to be easily categorized as a "comedy" or a "drama" or a "thriller"? Do you really want every movie to be easily categorized as "realistic" or "unrealistic"? Sure, let's just eliminate genre-benders all together and we'll be left with a bunch of boring, predictable films. But at least we can feel good about ourselves because then we can properly categorize them into tiny little boxes. Listen people, the tonal shifts are one reason this film is fun to watch. The same is true with the wild shifts between realism and unrealism. The final half-hour (that everyone complains about) gave me more surprises than the last three dozen "single genre" films I've seen recently.

This film refuses to limit itself, and that's why it's so entertaining and impressive.

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