George Rand and his wife are living in a cabin situated near his claim on the mountainside. One day Jim Slater, a bandit, is located by the Sheriff. The Sheriff fires, wounding Slater in ... See full summary »

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George Rand
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Mrs. George Rand
Burton L. King ...
Jim Slater
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George Rand and his wife are living in a cabin situated near his claim on the mountainside. One day Jim Slater, a bandit, is located by the Sheriff. The Sheriff fires, wounding Slater in the arm. He runs until he comes to the cabin of the Rands. He tells them a fictitious tale of injustice, and they decide to protect him. When the Sheriff calls Rand informs him that he has seen no one pass that answers the description. That night Slater steals Rand's gun and hat and sneaks out. A month passes and Slater is almost forgotten by the little family, but one morning Mrs. Rand, when counting up her little savings, sees a face at the window. He is Slater, but the rough beard covering his face prevents her from recognizing him. Rushing to the window he breaks the glass, puts his revolver through and commands Mrs. Rand to open the door. She does and he enters the cabin. Rand had forgotten his water bottle that morning and returns to his cabin for it. Upon his arrival he finds his wife holding ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Western

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19 November 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The picture is, indeed, most distressing
18 March 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

One wonders what object the writer of this picture had in view, what impression he desired to create. He shows ability in his construction. There are three qualities in every good dramatic production. They are clearness, smooth progress of incident, and interest. In this picture we find some of all of these; but precious little of the last and after all, with the people, it is the most important. In the early days the man who had committed some crime and was fleeing from justice used to be helped by a girl and he then found in her a sweetheart. This was the cause of much disgust. Then we found fugitives being helped and converted; but it wasn't found convincing enough. Of late, the helped fugitives are shown as biting the hand that helped them. At least it convinces,; but we can't sympathize with such a man; he disgusts most people. Now, looking merely at the present picture, is there any one with whom we can sympathize very heartily? The man and woman who warmed the viper at the hearth and got stung can be made interesting by true artists; but one reason why they are not in this case lies in the brutality of the man. When he has been fed in the cabin and both man and wife have lied to the sheriff, he gets up in the night and goes away with the man's gun and horse. And, next day, comes back in the man's absence and demands not only money but is taking the woman too. The picture is, indeed, most distressing. The characters are played skillfully. The badman by Burt King, the husband by Edgar Jones and the wife by Clara Williams. - The Moving Picture World, December 7, 1912


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