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Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun

Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun
Every Halloween, when you want to check out a horror movie to get your heart racing, or a hilarious scary movie send-up to celebrate the holiday with laughs, everybody seems to cycle back to some of the same old classics.

While the slasher movies we've all come to know and love are classics for a reason (see: Halloween, I Know What You Did Last Summer or Scream), it’s fun to dive a little deeper into the realm of obscure horror, where some of the truly great fright flicks hide in the shadows.

Check out Et’s suggestions for some of the great lesser-known gems of spooky cinema with this year's alternative Halloween viewing guide:

Vampire Movies

Typical Fare: Bram Stoker's Dracula, The Lost Boys, From Dusk Till Dawn

Alternative Option: Let the Right One In

This thoughtful Swedish horror tale, directed by Tomas Alfredson, is an entirely unique take on the well-trod territory of vampire
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Ten Classic Scary Movies For Halloween

I have known for years, many people will not watch black and white movies, of any kind. It has to be color and no older than 10 years, preferably movies made this year, or last year. I have had people look at me with astonishment when I tell them I not only watch black and white movies regularly but even silent movies. I’ve had people admit they didn’t know movies were being made in 1927, much less 1915.

So for this Hallowe’en, when movie geeks thoughts turn to scary movies here is my personal and eclectic list of great, old, scary movies, filmed in glorious black and white.

10. Nosferatu 1922

The Great Grand Daddy of all Dracula movies, and the template for every vampire movie ever made, the first, one of the best and still creepy, even if you’ve seen it repeatedly. A silent masterpiece by Fw Murnau and with
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Playback: Willem Dafoe on ‘The Florida Project’ and a Return to Superhero Movies in ‘Aquaman’

Playback: Willem Dafoe on ‘The Florida Project’ and a Return to Superhero Movies in ‘Aquaman’
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Willem Dafoe is making waves for his performance in Sean Baker’s “The Florida Project,” the critically-acclaimed story of a community of extended-stay motel guests in Central Florida. He plays the kind-hearted property manager Bobby in the film, and it’s a touching, tender portrayal that could net him his third Oscar nomination to date (after supporting bids for “Platoon” and “Shadow of the Vampire”).

In the film, Dafoe finds himself the central node, the recognizable face in a sea of non- and new actors. It was a varied ensemble experience featuring precocious children and even performers cast off Instagram.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“Even in an industry movie, a studio film, sometimes you’re working with people from very
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win
After last year’s three-Oscar haul for “Moonlight,” including Best Picture, A24 wants to prove that was no anomaly. Here’s what the rising young distributor will push this awards season. (Remember: A year ago, “Moonlight” wasn’t viewed as a likely Best Picture contender — much less the big winner.)

Co-founded by David Fenkel, John Hodges, and Daniel Katz, A24 is known for edgy arthouse pleasers that eschew conventional storytelling. “Moonlight” was the company’s first original production; its other box office players include Oscar-winners “Ex Machina,” “Room,” and “Amy,” and smart horror flick “The Witch.” But none have passed the $27 million box office earned by “Moonlight.”

Read More:Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

After the fall trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto, the company has three bonafide awards contenders: SXSW’s well-reviewed true story “The Disaster Artist” (December 1), director James Franco’s 14th
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win

  • Indiewire
A24’s Oscar Blitz: How The Studio is Positioning 9 Contenders After ‘Moonlight’s Best Picture Win
After last year’s three-Oscar haul for “Moonlight,” including Best Picture, A24 wants to prove that was no anomaly. Here’s what the rising young distributor will push this awards season. (Remember: A year ago, “Moonlight” wasn’t viewed as a likely Best Picture contender — much less the big winner.)

Co-founded by David Fenkel, John Hodges, and Daniel Katz, A24 is known for edgy arthouse pleasers that eschew conventional storytelling. “Moonlight” was the company’s first original production; its other box office players include Oscar-winners “Ex Machina,” “Room,” and “Amy,” and smart horror flick “The Witch.” But none have passed the $27 million box office earned by “Moonlight.”

Read More:Why Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is a Serious Oscar Contender

After the fall trifecta of Venice, Telluride and Toronto, the company has three bonafide awards contenders: SXSW’s well-reviewed true story “The Disaster Artist” (December 1), director James Franco’s 14th
See full article at Indiewire »

Great Job, Internet!: Let us briefly consider the majesty of Willem Dafoe’s face

  • The AV Club
Willem Dafoe’s just got one of those faces that burns itself into your memory. Its sharp lines contort readily into a devilish, toothy smile, and, while he’s wielded it to great success in roles as diverse as the Green Goblin in Spider-Man and Nosferatu in Shadow Of The Vampire, he’s never been typecast for it. Instead, as a video from Fandor explores, he’s vaulted between roles in Wes Anderson flicks, he’s played Jesus in The Last Temptation Of Christ, and he played a (very) wounded lover in Anti-Christ.

The through-line here is probably actually his talent and versatility as an actor, but also it’s that damn face, which seems to have been tailor-made to be filmed. Fortunately enough, he seems to have realized this, appearing in some 100 movies over the past three and a half decades, with seven slated for release this year ...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘The Florida Project’: A24 Launches the Likely Oscar Contender This October

‘The Florida Project’: A24 Launches the Likely Oscar Contender This October
“Moonlight” distributor A24 has found a release date for its big Cannes buy, Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project.” October 6th falls right after a fresh round of media attention coming out of likely play at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals in the course of an inevitable Oscar push. (Read IndieWire’s review.)

For Sean Baker’s follow-up to iPhone movie “Tangerine,” he returned to a project he started researching with co-writer Chris Bergoch back in 2013. (This time, he shot in 35 mm.) Only after “Tangerine” could he score financing for another look at outsiders living on the margins of society.

Read More: The Florida Project Review: Sean Baker’s Follow-Up to ‘Tangerine’ Delivers

The duo was fascinated by a strip of Orlando’s budget motels on Route 92, just a mile away from Disneyworld. Once designed to lure tourists, they now teem with families on the edge. Instead of E-rides,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Florida Project’: A24 Launches the Likely Oscar Contender This October

  • Indiewire
‘The Florida Project’: A24 Launches the Likely Oscar Contender This October
“Moonlight” distributor A24 has found a release date for its big Cannes buy, Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project.” October 6th falls right after a fresh round of media attention coming out of likely play at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals in the course of an inevitable Oscar push. (Read IndieWire’s review.)

For Sean Baker’s follow-up to iPhone movie “Tangerine,” he returned to a project he started researching with co-writer Chris Bergoch back in 2013. (This time, he shot in 35 mm.) Only after “Tangerine” could he score financing for another look at outsiders living on the margins of society.

Read More: The Florida Project Review: Sean Baker’s Follow-Up to ‘Tangerine’ Delivers

The duo was fascinated by a strip of Orlando’s budget motels on Route 92, just a mile away from Disneyworld. Once designed to lure tourists, they now teem with families on the edge. Instead of E-rides,
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ Was the Hot Buy of Cannes

Why Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ Was the Hot Buy of Cannes
Moonlight” distributor A24 landed the top English-language acquisition title at Cannes, Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project.” Sean Baker’s follow-up to iPhone movie “Tangerine,” he returned to a project he started researching with co-writer Chris Bergoch back in 2013. (This time, he shot in 35 mm.) Only after “Tangerine” could he score financing for another look at outsiders living on the margins of society.

The duo was fascinated by a strip of Orlando’s budget motels on Route 92, just a mile away from Disneyworld. Once designed to lure tourists, they now teem with families on the edge. Instead of E-rides, the kids find their fun in spitting on cars, peeking at topless bathers, stalking grazing cows, and panhandling for soft-serve ice cream to slurp before it melts in the blazing heat.

Baker had long wanted to make a film about children “that focused on their resilience, their innocence, and their comic nature,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Why Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ Was the Hot Buy of Cannes

  • Indiewire
Why Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ Was the Hot Buy of Cannes
“Moonlight” distributor A24 landed the top English-language acquisition title at Cannes, Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project.” For Sean Baker’s follow-up to iPhone movie “Tangerine,” he returned to a project he started researching with co-writer Chris Bergoch back in 2013. (This time, he shot in 35 mm.) Only after “Tangerine” could he score financing for another look at outsiders living on the margins of society.

The duo was fascinated by a strip of Orlando’s budget motels on Route 92, just a mile away from Disneyworld. Once designed to lure tourists, they now teem with families on the edge. Instead of E-rides, the kids find their fun in spitting on cars, peeking at topless bathers, stalking grazing cows, and panhandling for soft-serve ice cream to slurp before it melts in the blazing heat.

Baker had long wanted to make a film about children “that focused on their resilience, their innocence, and their comic nature,
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscar Race at Cannes: Here Are the Winners and Losers

After all the red-carpet lineups, anxious security delays, gala black-tie dinners, multilingual press conferences, beachside afterparties, and yacht interviews, who came out ahead at Cannes? Several international filmmakers emerged with higher profiles; hot-ticket English-language title “The Florida Project” finally sold (after days of price-lowering anxiety) to American indie du jour A24 — but when it came to Oscars, Cannes delivered only a handful of contenders.

The lion’s share of this year’s downbeat program, rife with suicidal tendencies and abused children, will never be heard from again stateside. The most entertaining material came from two TV sequels from favorite Cannes auteurs: David Lynch’s return to “Twin Peaks” and Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake: China Girl,” starring Elisabeth Moss and the ubiquitous Nicole Kidman, who took home a well-deserved special Cannes jury prize on Sunday.

And Mexico’s Three Amigos, with no feature films in the selection,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Oscar Race at Cannes: Here Are the Winners and Losers

  • Indiewire
After all the red-carpet lineups, anxious security delays, gala black-tie dinners, multilingual press conferences, beachside afterparties, and yacht interviews, who came out ahead at Cannes? Several international filmmakers emerged with higher profiles; hot-ticket English-language title “The Florida Project” finally sold (after days of price-lowering anxiety) to American indie du jour A24 — but when it came to Oscars, Cannes delivered only a handful of contenders.

The lion’s share of this year’s downbeat program, rife with suicidal tendencies and abused children, will never be heard from again stateside. The most entertaining material came from two TV sequels from favorite Cannes auteurs: David Lynch’s return to “Twin Peaks” and Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake: China Girl,” starring Elisabeth Moss and the ubiquitous Nicole Kidman, who took home a well-deserved special Cannes jury prize on Sunday.

And Mexico’s Three Amigos, with no feature films in the selection,
See full article at Indiewire »

The 25 greatest movies about making movies

Mark Harrison May 19, 2017

From the currently playing Their Finest to the likes of Bowfinger and Boogie Nights, we salute the movies about making movies...

If you haven't caught up yet, Their Finest is currently playing in UK cinemas and it's a gorgeous little love letter to perseverance through storytelling, set against the backdrop of a film production office at the British Ministry of Information during the Second World War. Based on Lissa Evans' novel, Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy play characters whose access to the film industry has been contingent on the global crisis that takes other young men away from such trifling matters, and it's a real joy to watch.

Among other things, the film got us thinking about other films about making films. We're not talking about documentaries, even though Hearts Of Darkness, the documentary about the making of Apocalypse Now, may be the greatest film about
See full article at Den of Geek »

Dog Eat Dog Trailer Sends Nicolas Cage and Willem Dafoe on the Run

  • MovieWeb
Dog Eat Dog Trailer Sends Nicolas Cage and Willem Dafoe on the Run
Do you love Raising Arizona? Then you're going to love this! Nicolas Cage pays homage to the Coen Brothers classic in his latest movie Dog Eat Dog. Today, we have a first look at the movie. From Rlj Entertainment comes the hilarious and action-packed trailer along with the official poster.

Legendary filmmaker Paul Schrader directs this "sordid and engaging crime drama" (The Hollywood Reporter). Dog Eat Dog stars Academy Award winner Nicolas Cage. The pair previously worked together on the much maligned drama Dying of the Light back in 2014. Paul Schrader also wrote the screenplay for Nicolas Cage's acclaimed Emt drama Bringing Out the Dead, which was directed by Martin Scorsese.

Academy Award nominee Willem Dafoe (Platoon) joins Nicolas Cage in Dog Eat Dog. The pair first worked together in David Lynch's cult hit Wild at Heart. Though the pair hasn't been seen on screen together since 1990, Nicolas Cage
See full article at MovieWeb »

Willem Dafoe On Justice League And How His Role In Sam Raimi's Spider-man Helped His Career

In an interesting, in-depth interview with The Playlist, Willem Dafoe (Spider-Man, Antichrist, Shadow Of The Vampire) discusses everything from his 35-year stint in Hollywood, to the directors he's worked with, to his many roles. Of course, one particular upcoming role has the Cbm community very excited indeed. The recent Justice League set reports confirmed that Dafoe would be playing an Atlantean named Vulko in the movie, but unfortunately the actor isn't interested in discussing anything related to his role. When asked about that and his co-star, Gal Gadot, he did confirm that he'd already shot some of his scenes and would be returning to film some more at a later date. "She looks good. (Laughs) I don’t want to talk about that. I’ve got so many movies to talk about. I’ll let them orchestrate the publicity on that movie. I’m happy to be a part of
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Honors Stars and Filmmakers

Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Honors Stars and Filmmakers
Jirina Bohdalová

The President’s Award

Actress Jirina Bohdalová will receive the President’s Award at the upcoming 51st Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival. A force in Czech entertainment for nearly 80 years and one of its most beloved figures, the still-active Bohdalová’s career spans stage, film, and television performances. Cementing her reputation as a national treasure, she also hosted (with Vladimír Dvorák) the massively successful, long-running, live TV sketch show “Televarieté,” dubbed foreign films and provided expressive voice work on numerous Czech animated TV series, particularly the fairy tales created for “Evening Story.” [“Vecernícek”]. Writer-director Slávek Horák [“Home Care”] recalls, “Whole generations [including mine] grew up listening to her every evening at 7, universally accepted by kids and parents as the bedtime call.”

So ubiquitous a figure is “Bohdalka” [as her fans affectionately refer to her] that it is nearly impossible to conceive of Czech popular culture without her.

Born in 1931 to a working-class family in Prague, Bohdalová was a precocious extrovert from a young age.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Beauty vs Beast: In Carol's Orbit

Jason from Mnpp here, christening 2016 (yes, the whole darn year) "The Year of Carol" -- a memo the Globes missed. Like Therese Belivet I've just got stars in my eyes (or maybe I just feel bad I didn't manage to do this edition of "Beauty vs Beast" during Carol Week proper here at Tfe) but I'm still head over for Todd Haynes' true romance and I have a feeling many of you are too. Point being every week should be Carol week, so let's keep singing! For the briefest of seconds I considered forcing us to choose between our leading ladies of lesbian love (as Oscar voters should have to do in a righteous, Category-Fraud free world) but not, no, it's time for the true Supporting Characters to shine.

Previously It was the 15th anniversary of the great Shadow of the Vampire last week and in between the holidays
See full article at FilmExperience »

Beauty vs Beast: Shadow of the Auteur

Ja from Mnpp here christening 2015's final episode of "Beauty vs Beast" with one of my favorite movies of ever, which is celebrating it's 15th anniversary this week - E. Elias Merhige's Shadow of the Vampire, which fictionalized the filming of F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu by adding in some actual behind-the-scenes bloodsucking, was released on December 29th, 2000 -- I have strangely fixed memories of seeing this film for the first time, from the dreamy Art Deco opening credits on down; anyway it left a mark, so don't ask me what the hell happened to Merhige after this. He's only made one more feature-length film since, the 2004 serial killer thriller Suspect Zero with Ben Kingsley.

As for Shadow of the Vampire it didn't do great box-office-wise but it did manage to score two Oscar nominations - one for Make-Up and a much-deserved Best Supporting Actor nomination for Willem Dafoe, playing
See full article at FilmExperience »

Day of the Dead Movie List: Top 5 Most Freakish Living Dead, Undead, and Ghosts

Hell's Kitchen: Soul stew image likely from the 1922 Benjamin Christensen horror classic 'Häxan / Witchcraft Through the Ages.' Day of the Dead post: Cinema's Top Five Scariest Living Dead We should all be eternally grateful to the pagans, who had the foresight to come up with many (most?) of the overworked Western world's religious holidays. Thanks to them, besides Easter, Christmas, New Year's, and possibly Mardi Gras (a holiday in some countries), we also have Halloween, All Saints' Day, and the Day of Dead. The latter two are public holidays in a number of countries with large Catholic populations. Since today marks the end of the annual Halloween / All Saints' Day / Day of the Dead celebrations, I'm posting my revised and expanded list of the movies' Top Five Scariest Living Dead. Of course, by that I don't mean the actors listed below were dead when the movies were made.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Gamechangers & why we need a good film about game design

  • Den of Geek
BBC’s The Gamechangers didn’t exactly do its GTA subject matter justice. Ryan explains why we need a great movie about game design...

There’s a moment in the BBC’s drama The Gamechangers where Sam Houser, the co-founder of Grand Theft Auto studio Rockstar North, says to one of his minions, “We need to make our own game engine.”

In the very next scene, the game engine’s finished and demonstrated to Jamie, another Rockstar co-founder. To the casual observer, it might seem as though the process of making a game engine is as simple as ordering a pizza.

It’s an example of the 90-minute show’s clumsy handling of its subject matter: the videogame phenomenon Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas, its social impact and its controversy. This was the kind of drama that felt the need to carefully explain some things in painfully literal terms -
See full article at Den of Geek »
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