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Death of a Salesman (1966)

TV Movie  -   -  Drama  -  8 May 1966 (USA)
7.8
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Ratings: 7.8/10 from 343 users  
Reviews: 9 user | 2 critic

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Title: Death of a Salesman (TV Movie 1966)

Death of a Salesman (TV Movie 1966) on IMDb 7.8/10

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Won 3 Primetime Emmys. Another 2 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
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Stanley
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Charley
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Ben
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Stanley
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Jenny
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Howard
Joan Patrick ...
Marge Redmond ...
Woman in Hotel
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Bernard
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Drama

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8 May 1966 (USA)  »

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Death of a Salesman  »

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Trivia

The 1966 television drama "Death of a Salesman" was video taped in Los Angeles at the CBS Television City (studios), located at Beverly Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. Tom John, an established New York television designer/art director was hired to design the production. Tom employed his NY assistant, Chuck Murawski as his assistant art director, flying Chuck from New York for the four week prep period. The television play adaptation was rehearsed in the mezzanine rehearsal rooms adjacent the third floor art department. (This rehearsal hall was later used by Carol Burnett for her show's rehearsal and for her private exercise club meetings during the 'Carol Burnett Variety Show" weekly schedule.) During the production period, Tom and another 'Hollywood designer friend' Jim Trittipo, who often visited each other during the production schedule, late one mid-night, were in the CBS art department. An original gauche film production sketch from "Gone With The Wind" had graced the walls of the art department for years! The pair decided to steal the "burning of Atlanta" sketch, using a mat knife, slicing the illustration down the middle, so that each could have a 'souvenier'. See more »

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Version of Death of a Salesman (1985) See more »

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This DVD is as good as what you'll see on the stage
2 November 2013 | by (colorado) – See all my reviews

Death of a Salesman, in a tough competition with Long Day's Journey Into Night, is considered to be the best American play ever written. Our branch state university, conveniently located just 2 miles from my home, is presenting Salesman with an imported NY actor playing Loman. I wanted very much to see it but the $35 ticket price stopped me dead in my tracks. So, instead, I got this DVD from the library. Miller wrote his play to be performed live in a theatre, and while I agree that live theatre is the preferred medium, still, I'm grateful that the 1966 performances of Lee J. Cobb and Mildred Dunnock, both of whom appeared in the original 1949 stage production, have been preserved and are available to us. Both are superb, but Cobb is the star. In this performance he's the equal of Olivier. Although he swallows some of his lines, and makes me wish there were DVD captions for the 'hearing impaired', Cobb is Willy. What did the audiences of 1949, 17 years earlier, think of his Willy? Was Cobb as effective then as he is in 1966? In the 1966 filmed version Cobb was 55, in age closer to the play's 63 year old Willy. Also, another benefit of this DVD over any stage performance is that we see the actors in closeups, which is a major plus. As Norma Desmond said, "We had faces then", meaning that faces, not words, conveyed emotions to an audience. The other actors are all fine, although it's a bit unsettling to see that Hap is very Italian compared to his brother Biff. I'm now reading the play in preparation to viewing this DVD again, and probably a third time. It's that good.


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