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Shanghai Noon (2000) Poster

(2000)

Trivia

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The English translation of the drinking game song is: One crab with eight feet, painted horns - what a big crab./ Blinking eyes, shrinking head,/ crawling, crawling everywhere./ Two and Two, who should drink?/ Three and three, who drink first?/ Five and Five, who should drink?/ Two and two, you drink first.
Brandon Merrill, who plays Jackie Chan's horse-riding Native American wife, is a real-life rodeo champion. As of August 2015, this is her only film role.
During the scene where Roy and Chon are drunk in the hotel, director Tom Dey hoped to include a drunken kung fu scene, as an homage to The Legend of Drunken Master (1994). There was no time to choreograph such a scene, so Dey showed Chon blowing bubbles from his mouth, as Wong Fei-hung does in The Legend of Drunken Master (1994).
When Roy O'Bannon finds out that the new member of his gang is from Texas, he replies, "Texas, are you insane?!" Owen Wilson, who plays Roy, is from Texas.
The catchy quote "I don't know karate, but I know crazy" is actually a line from a James Brown song.
The name of Marshall Nathan Van Cleef is a homage to Lee Van Cleef, who starred in many spaghetti westerns.
Chon Wang is the Chinese translation/pronunciation of John Wayne. However, in the case of Jackie Chan's character, Chon represents his last name while Wang is his first name. This represents the order Chinese names are presented.
In the end of the movie, Roy O'Bannon's real name is revealed to be Wyatt Earp. In real life, Wyatt Earp was a gambler and later on a Sheriff, much like the character from the movie.
The Chinese characters shown in the background during the opening credits are excerpts from a translation of "The Frog Prince".
The name of the Native American girl played by Brandon Merrill is never mentioned at any point in the movie, but the credits list her character name as being Falling Leaves.
The song playing during the first bar-fight sequence ("La Grange" by ZZ Top) is the same song that plays during the The Dirty Dozen (1967)-style intro of the characters in Armageddon (1998), an earlier Owen Wilson film.
According to the commentary: the fight scene with the horseshoe was nearly impossible to do with a fake horseshoe as it was too light. Jackie Chan, however, refused to strike any of the stuntmen with a real horseshoe, saying it was too dangerous.
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The plot is very similar to the western film Red Sun (1971), with Dey's film starring Chan, Wilson, and Goggins in place of respectively Toshirô Mifune, Charles Bronson, and Alain Delon.
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Curtis Armstrong filmed scenes in the role of Bulldog Drummond, but his scenes were cut before the movie was released. They can all be seen together in the deleted scenes on the DVD.
Chon bids Roy goodbye by saying "sayanora". A Japanese word for farewell.
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The name of the presiding judge, written on the wall of the building behind Roy and Chon when they are about to be hanged, is "Moriarty" - a nod to Associate Producer Bruce Moriarty.
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The song played when Roy is teaching Chon to be a cowboy is Kid Rock's "Cowboy".
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The title is a play on the western classic High Noon (1952).
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The scene at the end, outside the church and heavily surrounded, is an homage to Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969).
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The traveling show (seen at the end behind Roy O'Bannon's former gang) has a reference to the western television series Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (1993), and also a reference to Sapper's Bulldog Drummond character.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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