A talk show hosted by Wally George, in which George expounds on his extreme right-wing political views and insults guests and audience members who don't agree with him.
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Cast

Credited cast:
Wally George ...
 Host
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Billy Bancroft ...
 Co-Host
David Kennedy ...
 Co-Host
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A talk show hosted by Wally George, in which George expounds on his extreme right-wing political views and insults guests and audience members who don't agree with him.

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right wing politics | See All (1) »

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Talk-Show

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Release Date:

16 July 1983 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Wally George Show  »

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Trivia

Each hour-long edition of the show was videotaped in front of a live studio audience on Wednesday night, with the tape subsequently being reviewed by the production staff, before being edited and finalized for air three days later on Saturday night. See more »

Connections

Featured in Za shokkusu: sekai no mokugekisha (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

World in Action (1984-1992 theme)
Written by John Coleman
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User Reviews

Hot Seat with Wally George, A Eulogy
15 April 2005 | by (The Infernal Empire) – See all my reviews

Evocation: I first became acquainted with The Wally George Show when I was in High School, on UHF's KDOC Channel 56 Los Angeles {a station which preserves timeless favorites}, which was re-airing episodes of Dark Shadows at the time, when I saw a commercial for the program, airing at 11pm on Saturday nights, so I decided to tune in. His demeanor was amusing, yelling and insulting guests was his shtick, and even though he addressed what was to be the subject of the show, he always turned it into a verbal shouting match with an audience of mostly drunken supporters shouting "Wally! Wally!", hardly letting the guest get a word in edge-wise, and when they did, they were often called "idiots", "morons", or if female, the ubiquitous "bimbo" was often used, which was also repeated by the belligerent and inebriated crowd. He was typified as the raucous Conservative with the American flag, an enlarged photo of The Challenger, and John Wayne on the rickety baby-blue cubicle-like backdrop enfolding around his desk, upon which was always that apple-boysenberry juice in his mug. It was not a show for serious consideration, but purely for entertainment purposes. His co-host included a yes-man named "David Kennedy" who actually did interject relatively cohesive commentary from time to time.

Of note, his guests have included billboard-queen "Angelyne", Racist Tom Metzger and son, Rick Dees {a long-standing "feud" resulted in which one day as a guest George 'broke' a prop chair over his back, as well as having a pie-throwing episode}, fellow Conservative-loudmouth poseur Morton Downey Jr. {who owes his momentary fame to George, and whom he also had an ongoing "feud" with}, some regulars who appeared with various agendas and cardboard props which were frequently torn from their hands, ripped to pieces and thrown over George's shoulders, members of Heavy Metal band "Dagahoggit" {said to mean "castration by teeth"}, Rebel-Rebel, The Mentors, and Radio Werewolf, along with a slew of strippers, male and female wrestlers {most times actually becoming involved in staged mud-wrestling}, and even a Wally George impersonator at one point {the 'real' Wally George was predictably removed by the resident 'security guards' therein}.

During his tenure, George cameoed in several films including "A Nightmare of Elm Street 5", "Repossessed" {a hilarious parody of 'The Exorcist' starring Leslie Nielson & Linda Blair}, "Club Fed", and "Grunt: The Wrestling Movie", among others. He also eventually wrote a book entitled "The Father of Combat Television", and was even featured as the subject on E!'s "True Hollywood Story" at one time, which has slipped into obscurity.

Also of note, his estranged daughter happens to be actress Rebecca Demornay {Risky Business, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle}, who wanted little to nothing to do with her father.

Eventually, George began playing re-runs of his show which included daily monologues in which one could perceive his increasing physical deterioration, yet he persisted almost until his last days. He occasionally had guests on, mostly consisting of sponsors. He also hosted a radio show for a time, which was much more of the same, for it went on for several hours. Within the last month, a message came up asking viewers to pray for him in his failing health. And now it seems that most traces of his show have been seemingly wiped out, even on the web, which began with the abrupt removal of Hot Seat from the airwaves altogether, without so much as a word of warning.

Through all of this Wally George was essentially a performer, and with that in mind, one could overlook the sometimes absurd antics and attempted 'seriousness' he tried to assert during some commentaries. Love him, hate him, or indifferent about him, he sure was amusing, And for that amusement, the program is missed.

He is survived by daughters Rebecca Demornay, Holly George, and a questionable young ex-wife often shown as part of the crew.

Note: This Evocation was written largely because of sudden inspiration, the relative obscurity of this entertainer, the sad obfuscation of information, and the preservation of this segment of the "Schlock" genre. For the purposes of evocative entertainment, this entire series should be made available on DVD.


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