Almost Famous
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 71 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Cleveland According to Movies and Television

19 July 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Our perception of the Forest City having only seen it on screen.

All this week, Cleveland, Ohio, is being overrun with politicians, their supporters, and protestors of their platforms as the Republican National Convention is being held at the Quicken Loans Arena through Thursday. To help get a better sense of this “Cleve-Land,” as Howard the Duck calls it, we’re looking to entertainment, specifically movies and television, for what it can tell us about this city. If there’s anything we miss or misunderstand, blame Hollywood.

Cleveland Rocks

It’s the Rock and Roll Capital of the World, home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it’s not surprising that, to an outsider, Cleveland primarily looks like a city where music reigns. You could make a nice concert with all the fictional bands based there, including Cherry Bomb from Howard the Duck, The Barbusters from Light of Day, the »

- Christopher Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch 'Difficult People' Star Julie Klausner on 'Fictional Characters I Hate'

19 July 2016 10:20 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The second season of Julie Klausner's blisteringly funny sitcom Difficult People is now in full swing on Hulu, in which Klausner and partner-in-crime Billy Eichner portray lightly fictionalized versions of themselves as they struggle to land a date, a showbiz connection, or just a quick payday. And in this exclusive video interview with Rolling Stone, the comedian uses her talent for cutting putdowns to call out four purely fictional figures she hates.

She starts in on Denis Leary's character on the FX comedy series Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Giveaway – Win Queen of Earth, Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition

11 July 2016 1:20 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

We have three copies to give away of Queen of Earth, Alex Ross Perry’s thrilling examination of a deeply complex relationship between two women at the extremities of misery.

Catherine (Elisabeth Moss) has entered a particularly dark phase in her life: her father, a famous artist whose affairs she managed, has recently died, and on the heels of his death she’s dumped by her boyfriend James (Kentucker Audley). With relaxation and the idea of gathering her thoughts, Catherine heads to her friend Virginia’s (Katherine Waterston) lake house for some much needed rest. However, once Catherine arrives relaxation proves impossible to find, as she is overcome with memories of time spent at the same house with James the year before. As cracks in the relationship between the two women begin to appear, Catherine soon starts descending into a downward spiral of delusion and madness.

A bracing, eerie look »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


17 times movies and TV shows were refused rights to songs

30 June 2016 9:23 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Louisa Mellor Jul 1, 2016

Not every artist is happy to have their song featured in a particular TV show or film. Here are 17 times the rights were refused...

It's not only political campaigns that inspire musical artists to exercise the power of veto on the use of their songs. For reasons of finance, reputation, ego, taste and more, the following TV shows and films weren't able to secure the use of the recordings they originally sought...

Frank SinatraGoodfellas

This Express piece quotes an Empire Magazine interview with Martin Scorsese’s long-time editor Thelma Schoonmaker in which she relates how the original plan was to have Frank Sinatra’s original recording of My Way play over the end credits of modern gangster classic Goodfellas instead of the Sid Vicious cover that was eventually used.

Sinatra would never let Marty use his music,” explains Schoonmaker, “which is too bad because Marty may »

Permalink | Report a problem


Roadies: Will You Stay With the Band?

26 June 2016 8:00 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Almost Famous auteur Cameron Crowe this Sunday invited you to go on tour with the Roadies for the Staton-House Band. Will you stick around for upcoming dates?

In quick (and shamelessly Showtime-y) fashion, Roadies first introduces us to tour manager Bill (played by Luke Wilson) as he unwittingly beds a bigwig promoter’s (very) young daughter — which is par for the course for the divorcé, production manager Shelli (Carla Gugino) later points out. The premiere revolves around the Staton-House Band’s tour stop in New Orleans, where we next meet Kelly Ann (Imogen Poots), an electrician on the cusp of »

Permalink | Report a problem


Roadies Season 1 Review

26 June 2016 1:25 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Three episodes were provided prior to broadcast.

Cameron Crowe’s Almost Famous is one of the recently down-on-his-luck director’s finest films, a beautiful and touching tribute to the passion and power of rock ‘n’ roll. Its characters hum with urgency and life; its screenplay is a rawly funny, exuberantly upbeat exploration of idols and idealism, and the ways in which we can find hope in a world often intent on suffocating it. The same subject matter, especially that regarding the relationships between people whose admiration for music and lyrics has been channeled into a fully immersive profession, is on display in Crowe’s new Showtime series, Roadies, even if the show (in its early episodes) never comes close to matching the sheer potency and emotion of something as fully formed as Almost Famous.

Instead, the long-in-the-works project unfurls as an overly saccharine, if well-meaning peek behind the curtain of a music tour, »

- Isaac Feldberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Sunday, June 26: Cameron Crowe’s Roadies

25 June 2016 10:01 PM, PDT | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

Go on tour with the Staton-House Band, and get to know the colorful road crew who work behind the scenes of the stadium-filling rock band. Luke Wilson and Carla Gugino star as the band’s tour manager and production manager, and the series also stars Imogen Poots, Rafe Spall, Keisha Castle-Hughes, Peter Cambor and Richard Colson Baker, a.k.a. rapper Machine Gun Kelly. This cool and nostalgic series comes from the musical mind of writer/director Cameron Crowe (Almost Famous, Jerry Maguire) and is the Oscar winner’s first foray into television. [...]

The post Sunday, June 26: Cameron Crowe’s Roadies appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Channel Guide Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Cameron Crowe on ‘Roadies': Why Music Fans Need to Put Down Their Phones

24 June 2016 3:24 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

“For me, it’s just cool to be a middleman to some characters that people might relate to,” said writer-director Cameron Crowe, whose characters have included the likes of the quintessential stoner Jeff Spicoli in “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” the boombox-hoisting Lloyd Dobler in “Say Anything,” the driven agent Jerry Maguire in the movie that bears his name and the teenaged rock journalist William Miller (based on Crowe’s own adventures) in “Almost Famous,” for which he won a screenwriting Oscar. Crowe’s new cast of characters is on display in the Showtime series “Roadies,” his first foray into episodic television and. »

- Steve Pond

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Roadies’ Review: Cameron Crowe Keeps Rocking Down a Lost Highway

24 June 2016 12:54 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

In 2000, writer-director Cameron Crowe fictionalized his youth as a Rolling Stone reporter for the movie “Almost Famous,” exploring the romance and reality of being on the road with a rock ‘n’ roll band. Sixteen years later, Crowe revisits that terrain for “Roadies,” which features some of what the filmmaker does pretty well and far too much of what has doomed his recent efforts. Populated by likably quirky but flawed characters, this Showtime series, premiering Sunday, focuses on the men and women responsible for keeping a tour rolling from city to city. But it’s far too cutesy for its own. »

- Tim Grierson

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Roadies’ Review Roundup: Cameron Crowe’s Series Strikes The Same Notes, But Critics Want A Different Tune

24 June 2016 10:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Cameron Crowe’s Showtime series “Roadies” will finally debut this Sunday, June 26. The 10-episode show chronicles the wild and adventurous side of a committed group of roadies who live for music and the de facto family they’ve formed along the way. 

IndieWire’s Ben Travers gave the three episodes he saw a B, writing that the series “needs direction, but life on the bus is fun with Cameron Crowe.” He adds that “‘Roadies’ exemplifies the best of Crowe’s earnest exuberances, as well as the potholes he should now know how to avoid.”

Read More: Review: ‘Roadies’ Needs Direction, But Life on the Bus is Fun With Cameron Crowe

But many others didn’t feel like the tour was all that fun. “‘Roadies’ feels like a Spotify playlist in search of a reason to exist,” writes Maureen Ryan of Variety. Unsatisfied with the Crowe’s TV venture, she adds »

- Liz Calvario

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Roadies’ Review Roundup: Cameron Crowe’s Series Strikes The Same Notes, But Critics Want A Different Tune

24 June 2016 10:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cameron Crowe’s Showtime series “Roadies” will finally debut this Sunday, June 26. The 10-episode show chronicles the wild and adventurous side of a committed group of roadies who live for music and the de facto family they’ve formed along the way. 

IndieWire’s Ben Travers gave the three episodes he saw a B, writing that the series “needs direction, but life on the bus is fun with Cameron Crowe.” He adds that “‘Roadies’ exemplifies the best of Crowe’s earnest exuberances, as well as the potholes he should now know how to avoid.”

Read More: Review: ‘Roadies’ Needs Direction, But Life on the Bus is Fun With Cameron Crowe

But many others didn’t feel like the tour was all that fun. “‘Roadies’ feels like a Spotify playlist in search of a reason to exist,” writes Maureen Ryan of Variety. Unsatisfied with the Crowe’s TV venture, she adds »

- Liz Calvario

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Roadies’ Ep Cameron Crowe on His First TV Series, Movie Problems & Recasting Christina Hendricks

24 June 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

There’s little doubt that Cameron Crowe has a passion for music — his character-driven movies have famously celebrated the world of rock, whether by chronicling the life of a young journalist in “Almost Famous” or through the soundtracks woven through “Singles” or “Say Anything.”

Now he’s turning his creative skills to the small screen for the first time with Showtime’s “Roadies,” the story of the crew-turned-family behind the scenes of the Staton-House Band tour. Crowe created the series, working alongside executive producer Winnie Holzman (“My So-Called Life”).

Here, he tells Variety why he decided to make the move to television, why he’s frustrated with the movie business, and why he had to make some tough creative decisions along the way.

How did this project begin?

J.J. Abrams and I both worked at Gracie Films for James L. Brooks, a character comedy hero [of mine], and we made friends back then. He »

- Debra Birnbaum

Permalink | Report a problem


TVLine Items: Sharknado's 'Revealing' Teaser, Scream on the Move and More

22 June 2016 2:03 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Consider this a warning to all Great Whites in the Vegas area.

After the fate of Tara Reid’s April was left up to the audience to decide via online voting at the end of Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No!, a new trailer confirms Finn’s wife is alive and will be back for the next installment of the Syfy franchise, Sharknado: The 4th Awakens. (Watch the video above.)

RelatedSharknado 4 Teaser Trailer: Strippers Join the Battle to Defend Las Vegas

Additionally, a final wave of cameos for the latest Sharknado film (airing Sunday, July 31 at 8 pm), include »

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Can Cameron Crowe recapture 'Almost Famous' magic with 'Roadies'?

22 June 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

In one of the many famous lines of dialogue Cameron Crowe has written, Dorothy Boyd says of Jerry Maguire, "I love him for the man he wants to be, and I love him for the man that he almost is." Dorothy is a dreamer, like most of Crowe's heroes and heroines — and, at this stage of his career, like many of his fans. We love Crowe for the storyteller he's trying to be, and almost is, even though we'd have to go all the way back to 2000's Almost Famous for a scripted project where Crowe actually lived up to his full potential as writer and director. With the likes of Elizabethtown and We Bought a Zoo, Crowe fans would look for even the faintest signs of the man who had given us Jeff Spicoli, Lloyd Dobler, Rod Tidwell, Penny Lane, and so many more, and hope for better the next time out. »

- Alan Sepinwall

Permalink | Report a problem


'Roadies': Everything You Need to Know

21 June 2016 1:19 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Meet the men and women who work behind the scenes to make big concerts happen. Showtime's new series Roadies comes from the mind of Cameron Crowe, the former Rolling Stone reporter and writer-director of the modern-movie classics Say Anything…, Jerry Maguire and Almost Famous. His light touch and decades of insider experience make this the rare showbiz saga that's more quirky and heartfelt than shocking and grim. The first episode airs this Sunday, June 26th (and is also currently available on YouTube for free, in an tamer TV-14 version), but »

Permalink | Report a problem


TV Review: ‘Roadies’

20 June 2016 3:29 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Remember concept albums? They still exist, but not quite in the form they took in the ‘70s and ‘80s, when rock musicians made double albums because a single album couldn’t hold all their great ideas. The problem was, in those bloated behemoths, there were rarely enough inspired notions to power one album; most double and triple albums were made to pump up the egos of the people who created them, and those gatefold sleeves, when actually acquired by members of the public, were often put to other uses.

The lumbering beast known as the double album has largely gone the way of the dinosaurs, but one can revisit that kind of tedious sprawl in “Roadies,” which feels like a Spotify playlist in search of a reason to exist.

The first episode of “Roadies” is more tolerable than the even longer pilot for the similarly themed ’70s rock drama “Vinyl,” but »

- Maureen Ryan

Permalink | Report a problem


'Roadies': TV Review

20 June 2016 12:20 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Cameron Crowe has all the bona fides — let's get that out of the way right up front. His backstory as a music journalist is legendary, he has more and better stories about rock 'n' roll than you will ever have and among his many films are two that stand out for music fans as cutting right to the emotional bone of why they even listen in the first place — Singles and Almost Famous. And, yes, he did Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Say Anything, which also were fueled by music and, well, other fine films as well.

read more

»

- Tim Goodman

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: ‘Roadies’ Needs Direction, But Life on the Bus is Fun With Cameron Crowe

17 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Cameron Crowe is a writer defined by his early success. “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” “Say Anything,” “Almost Famous” and “Jerry Maguire” are all landmark films that, no matter what comes next for the man behind them, will remain indisputable classics for the rest of time. Yes, even after unmitigated disasters like “Vanilla Sky” and “Aloha,” Crowe’s early films remain untarnished.

So it’s almost too fitting that the music journalist-turned-filmmaker kicks off the next phase of his career — a television show he’s created, directed and co-written — by using a legendary rock band, past it’s prime but looking to recapture the magic, as an allegorical device for, well, everything; just as it’s fitting that “Roadies” exemplifies the best of Crowe’s earnest exuberances, as well as the potholes he should now know how to avoid.

Even with both in the mix, the new Showtime drama is mostly a fun ride. »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: ‘Roadies’ Needs Direction, But Life on the Bus is Fun With Cameron Crowe

17 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cameron Crowe is a writer defined by his early success. “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” “Say Anything,” “Almost Famous” and “Jerry Maguire” are all landmark films that, no matter what comes next for the man behind them, will remain indisputable classics for the rest of time. Yes, even after unmitigated disasters like “Vanilla Sky” and “Aloha,” Crowe’s early films remain untarnished.

So it’s almost too fitting that the music journalist-turned-filmmaker kicks off the next phase of his career — a television show he’s created, directed and co-written — by using a legendary rock band, past it’s prime but looking to recapture the magic, as an allegorical device for, well, everything; just as it’s fitting that “Roadies” exemplifies the best of Crowe’s earnest exuberances, as well as the potholes he should now know how to avoid.

Even with both in the mix, the new Showtime drama is mostly a fun ride. »

- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Roadies’ Series Premiere: The 5 Best Cameron Crowe-isms From The First Episode

14 June 2016 2:49 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

For the past 27 years, director Cameron Crowe has specialized in making films about earnest, “uncool” people who live and die by their passions. From “Say Anything…” to “Almost Famous,” Crowe’s films focus on that feeling of intense love, for people, for places, and especially for music. His upcoming Showtime TV series “Roadies” continues with that theme by focusing on a makeshift family of roadies for the fictional rock group the Staten-House Band. Starring Luke Wilson as Bill the tour manager and Carla Gugino as Shelli the production manager, “Roadies” follows the road crew as their lives are about to change with the arrival of a financial advisor who wants to overhaul their latest tour. The pilot was just released online ahead of its June 26th premiere date for those who are just itching to see what Crowe’s next project looks like. Below, IndieWIRE has the five best Cameron Crowe-isms from the very first episode of “Roadies.”

Read More: The 20 Greatest Musical Moments In The Films Of Cameron Crowe

1. Music As Organizing Life Principle

Cameron Crowe began his career writing for Rolling Stone magazine as a rock journalist; his first cover story was on The Allman Brothers Band tour in which he not only interviewed the band, but the entire road crew as well. This period of his life served as inspiration for “Almost Famous,” Crowe’s love letter to rock ‘n’ roll, but it has also clearly inspired “Roadies,” as the series affectionately documents the people whose lives revolve around making sure musicians have everything they need to perform their magic. Bill and Shelli desperately try to maintain order in an industry that feeds off of disorder, dealing with annoying, violent childen, crazy stalkers, and even the occasional firearm. But they, and the rest of the large ensemble cast, do it because of the music.

2. Fandom, or How To Maintain Love In The Face of All Obstacles

One of the major subplots in the pilot involves Kelly Ann (Imogen Poots), a young roadie who’s leaving the tour to go to film school in New York on a half-scholarship. She says she can “no longer hear the music anymore,” and she thinks the longer she stays on the tour, her love for not just the Staten-House Band, but music in general will slowly fade away. Crowe’s work often features a protagonist who’s love is frequently tested by numerous obstacles, and “Roadies” is no different as Kelly Ann’s determination to leave heightens when she sees the road crew threatened by management. But eventually, that resolve slowly crumbles as she realizes the family she’s leaving behind.

3. Heart-On-Your-Sleeve, Inspirational Montages

Though montages are frequently used as cheap emotional gimmickry, the best one’s still always stand out. Luckily, the “Roadies” pilot has many montages, so if one reads as bland, there’s another one along the way that could reach its potential. There’s a montage of the indie folk band The Head and The Heart doing a soundcheck, another of the road crew hard at work for their next gig, and finally the cheesiest, but most effective montages of all features a character running towards what has been in their heart all along.

4. Honesty and Authenticity Above All Else

When the financial advisor Reg Whitehead (Rafe Spall) comes on the tour, he immediately fires a beloved old roadie (Ron White) for being under federal investigation for reselling items left in storage units by victims of Hurricane Katrina. Next, he gathers the crew to talk about branding, market potential, and keeping costs to a minimum. Naturally, this prompts a negative response from the crew who know exactly what it takes to keep everything afloat, but it inspires a tirade from Kelly Ann who smells that Reg isn’t even a music fan (he calls Mumford and Sons “The Mumford Sons”). She preaches authentic feeling that a band’s music can inspire as the only brand worth following. “You either love what you do or get the fuck out,” she says.

5. A Romance At The Center

Crowe loves romance about as much as he loves classic rock, so naturally there will be a romance at the center of “Roadies.” Though details are scant in the pilot, Bill and Shelli were once in a relationship that’s now long since over. Shelli is currently married to a production manager on the Taylor Swift tour, and Bill sleeps with twenty-somethings to numb the end of his relationship. But there are still sparks between them and all the bickering can’t conceal their true feelings. One can reasonably predict that they will be in each other’s arms soon enough.

Read More: Cameron Crowe Apologizes For Casting Emma Stone As Allison Ng In ‘Aloha

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories'Roadies': Watch The First Episode Of Cameron Crowe's New Drama For Free Now'Homeland' Pushed to January: Executive Producer Explains Why That's NecessaryDaniel Craig Starring, Executive-Producing in Jonathan Franzen's 'Purity' for Showtime »

- Vikram Murthi

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 71 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners