Minority Report
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This film is loosely based on the short story "The Minority Report" by Philip K. Dick. There are some differences between the book and the movie:

1. The story is set in New York City, while the film uses the backdrop of Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Maryland and northern Virginia.

2. PreCrime is a government branch in the story and a police department in the movie.

3. In the story, John Anderton is a 50-year-old balding, out-of-shape police officer who created PreCrime, while in the movie Anderton is in his late 30s, handsome, small, athletic, with a full head of hair, who joined PreCrime after his son's kidnapping.

4. Anderton in the story is older than his wife Lisa, while Anderton in the movie is younger than his wife Lara, who by the time of the events in the movie had left him because he reminded her of her son.

5. The precogs were originally named Mike, Donna, and Jerry, and were deformed and mentally impaired. In the film, they are called Agatha, Dashiell and Arthur after crime-story writers Agatha Christie, Dashiell Hammett and Arthur Conan Doyle. They are children of drug addicts, thier mutations made them to dream of future murders, which are captured by machines. They are "deified" by the PreCrime officers, and are implied to be intelligent (Agatha guides Anderton successfully through a crowded mall while being pursued by PreCrime, and the trio are seen reading large piles of books at the end of the film). In the end of the movie they retire to a rural cottage where they continue their lives in freedom and peace.

6. In the short story, Anderton's future victim is General Leopold Kaplan, who wants to discredit PreCrime in order to get more financing for the military. At the end of the story, Anderton kills him to prevent the destruction of PreCrime. In the movie, Anderton is supposed to kill someone named Leo Crow, but later finds out Crow is just a part of a set-up to prevent Anderton from discovering a different murder committed years ago by his superior, Lamar Burgess. At the end of the film, Anderton confronts Burgess, who commits suicide and sends PreCrime into oblivion.

7. In the short story, Anderton seeks the precogs to hear their "minority reports". In the movie, Anderton kidnaps a female precog in order to discover her own "minority report" and extract the information about a mysterious crime.

8. The short story ends with Anderton and Lisa moving to a space colony after Kaplan's murder. The movie finishes with the couple reunited after the conspiracy's resolution, expecting their second child.

"First Movement" from "Symphony No.7 (in the past also No.8) in B Minor, D.759 (Unfinished)" (1822) Written by Franz Schubert Conducted by Carlos Kleiber Performed by Die Wiener Philharmoniker (as Wiener Philharmoniker) Courtesy of Deutsche Grammophon GmbH. Hamburg Under license from Universal Music Enterprises.

It's assumed, although the film doesn't explain, that the Temple uses different security than the system we see around the city. Clearly Anderton would be an expert on the Temple and the ways to bypass the security, so he was able to gain entry. It's also possible that there was a human error made in terms of assuming that Anderton would be caught before getting to the Temple, so his access wasn't cancelled. Also, since Lamar is the Director of PreCrime, he could have made sure Anderton still had security clearance, since he was framing John and might have deduced that Anderton would try to break in to get at the precogs.

There is, however, an inescapable continuity error near the end of the film when Lara uses John's eye to access the prison system where John is being sequestered. It is true that John was under arrest, making it unnecessary to remove his clearance. The authorities would be aware that his real eyes were never recovered after having them switched out, however, and it's extremely unlikely that they wouldn't remove the clearance as a precaution, especially given the increased scrutiny the department was under after the incidents in the film.

The music that is played on the organ is "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" composed by Johann Sebastian Bach, from his cantata "Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben", BWV 147.

She is singing a Swedish children's song about little frogs (Smaa grodorna). The lyrics describe how funny they are to look at with neither tails (ej svansar) nor ears (oeron).

The precogs see Leo's murder because John had decided (as he states later to Agatha after seeing the picture of his son on Crow's bed) years earlier he was going to murder the man who took his son from him if he ever found him. But this does not explain how the Precogs could already see the murder, if it was this premonition itself that caused John to look for Crow and kill him; in short, the murder seems to be caused by its own prediction (a self-fulfilling prophecy paradox often seen in many time-travel movies).

There are ways out of this paradox. Let us assume there was also another reason or clue that would have ended in the murder. Lamar Burgess may have initially set out a trail for John, an important piece of evidence, that would have led to John finding Crow over the course of a few days or so. This would cause a premonition that John would see of him killing Crow, but because this murder would occur on another day, it would differ from the premonition seen in the movie in certain details; the time of day could be different, the man on the billboard seen outside the window wouldn't be there, etc. It is actually this premonition that would provide John with early clues of the place and circumstances of the murder. This, in turn, would cause him to find and kill Crow much sooner than he would normally have done without seeing a premonition. So what happens is that John's 'spontaneous' future is replaced with an alternate future that we see in the movie; and, to make it more complicated: it is finally a premonition of this alternate future that John sees in the movie.

It's a fictional hallucinogen called Neuronin, street name is "Whiff". John uses it to deal with the disappearance of his son and his separation from his wife. Because it's a hallucinogen, it enhances the videos he watches of his family. John's use of whiff is to give his character a major flaw, to show he's not perfect.

It's pretty obvious that Dr Hineman is quite eccentric, probably because she's been living in isolation for years. Also, she may have suffered a mental breakdown after the discovery of the pre-cogs - after seeing what she created and knowing that it would lead to their isolation from society, Hineman may have begun to feel some heavy-duty guilt over it. When she kisses John, it's a way to make her eccentricity more plain for the audience.

Possibly because its the same author, however, the year is given when Anderton walks into Pre-Crime in the opening: 2054.

Possibility is that it may be in the same universe in different years and Since Blade Runner is set in Los Angeles 2019 and Minority Report is set in Washington D.C.

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