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Texas Lawmen (1951)

6.8
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Ratings: 6.8/10 from 9 users  
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As he dies from the wounds received from the Morrow outlaw gang, the sheriff of King City, Texas hands his badge to his deputy, Tod Merrick ('James Ellison'). In the Morrow gang are Bart ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Lewis Collins)

Writers:

(story), (screenplay)
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Title: Texas Lawmen (1951)

Texas Lawmen (1951) on IMDb 6.8/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Marshal Johnny Mack Brown
James Ellison ...
Sheriff Tod Merrick (as Jimmy Ellison)
...
Bart Morrow (as Stanford Jolley)
Lee Roberts ...
Steve Morrow
Terry Frost ...
Henchman Ed Mason
Marshall Reed ...
U. S. Marshal Potter (as Marshal Reed)
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Storyline

As he dies from the wounds received from the Morrow outlaw gang, the sheriff of King City, Texas hands his badge to his deputy, Tod Merrick ('James Ellison'). In the Morrow gang are Bart Morrow(I. Stanford Jolley), his son Steve (Lee Roberts) and Ed Mason (Terry Frost). Texas Ranger Johnny Mack Brown (Johnny Mack Brown) is assigned to the case. Johnny meets Tod who is also visited by Bart, who is his father, who once forced Tod to help in a bank robbery before Tod left and tried to make a new life under an assumed name. Johnny and another Ranger hold off an attempt by the Morrow gang to rob a stagecoach, and Johnny becomes convinced that Tod is giving the gang inside information. But when Tod is seriously wounded trying to arrest Bart, Steve and Ed, learns otherwise. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

RANGER CRACKS CHAIN OF STAGECOACH HOLDUPS! (original print ad-all caps) See more »

Genres:

Action | Western

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 December 1951 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Lone Star Lawman  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
an excellent example of the Johnny Mack Brown "Monogram" western
17 March 2006 | by (south Texas USA) – See all my reviews

During the 80's and early 90's, I managed to collect most of the extant Johnny Mack Brown westerns made at Monogram. While there is a sameness to some of them (true of virtually any western series--especially when you watch more than one of them each day!), on the whole they are a quality lot and, to me, the last GREAT b-movie series Westerns. By the late 40's, many of the western actors and crew members were probably available for work inexpensively, and Monogram put many of them to work in this series. As many of the films featured similar supporting casts, different films would feature some of them and in other films those same actors would have small walk-on roles not even credited in the beginning titles. Virtually EVERY supporting actor in these films is a western veteran who is a pleasure to watch. When people the stature of Lyle Talbot and John Hart are in a film and NOT listed in the opening credits, you know you've got a solid cast. Brown was always one of the best actors in b-westerns (check his early credits to see some of the major stars with whom he worked and held his own), and at this point in his career he had a depth and warmth and gravitas that commanded attention and respect, yet he lacked the aloof quality of a Tim McCoy and seemed approachable. The under-rated Jimmy "Shamrock" Ellison joined Brown in a number of Monograms, and he's fine here as a new sheriff with a secret. I. Stanford Jolley is superb as a grizzled robber with a link to Ellison that Ellison wishes he could forget. There are a number of genuinely emotional scenes involving Ellison and Brown, and the plot is quite clever (the story, incidentally, was written by actor Myron Healey!). The dozens of Johnny Mack Brown "Monogram" westerns are a fine body of work that can still be enjoyed today...when I'm watching one and my children wander into the room, they usually wind up staying for the rest of the film.


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