At the end of his life - he died on August 1st, 1997 -, the great Russian pianist agreed to talk in front of a camera to Bruno Monsaingeon. In a conversation interspersed with fascinating ... See full summary »

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Svyatoslav Richter ...
Himself (as Sviatoslav Richter)
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At the end of his life - he died on August 1st, 1997 -, the great Russian pianist agreed to talk in front of a camera to Bruno Monsaingeon. In a conversation interspersed with fascinating archive footage, Richter presents us with his memoirs from beyond the grave. Composed of two seventy-seven-minute episodes, this film is among those that leave a lasting impression. Written by Anonymous

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pianist | See All (1) »

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Music | Documentary

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Richter, l'insoumis  »

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Featured in Zomergasten: Episode #15.3 (2002) See more »

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A sad end to a brilliant career
17 January 2007 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

Perhaps this film confirms that, in the end, we are all failures because, in the end, we all get old and die. Sviatoslav Richter was certainly one of the best, if not THE best of his generation of concert pianists, a generation that was not short of talent. Though his interpretations were sometimes eccentric, his performances always seemed valid and always grabbed the listeners' interest. I have many Richter recordings, some dating from the 1950s. To see him in this film in his final years was a terrible shock. To see this depressed, resigned, shadow of a man look back on a career that was successful by any standard and regard it with such indifference is one of the saddest portraits I have ever seen. He seems to say that his job was like any other job. He is glad that he did it tolerably well but now it is over and all there is to do is die. What a contrast to the bio-doc on the career of Artur Rubenstein that I saw at about the same time, a pianist who was widely and justifiably admired but who admitted having a limited technique and the skill to hide it. Both films are great historical records for all music lovers.


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