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Turning 40: 3 Great Movies Released in 1978

We live in an age of revivals, reboots, and remakes. Hollywood seems to have lost the taste for original stories, preferring to reach back to the successful movies of the past, hoping to be able to play it safe and pocket a hefty profit in the process. Sometimes, it works – the remake of Stephen King’s “It” has proven this – and other times, it doesn’t – just think of the dismal reviews (and pretty lousy revenues) of this year’s “The Mummy”, which might have been a profitable movie per se, with its $400 million-plus debut against a $375 million budget, buy a disappointing debut for Universal’s “Dark Universe”.

Next year, many of the most famous and well-known movie franchises of our times will celebrate their thirtieth anniversaries. Some of these will be marked by remakes hitting the screens, either in the cinemas or through other mediums, such as video games,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Geoffrey Rush Steps Down from Australia Screen Industry Academy Amidst Allegations

Amidst the current wave of sexual assault cases against Hollywood stars, it now seems that allegations are affecting people across the waters. The latest to be hit by allegations is Australian actor Geoffrey Rush. Veteran actor Rush is one of the few actors to have the honor of winning the ‘Triple Crown of Acting’. This is because he has won an Academy Award, a Primetime Emmy Award, and a Tony Award. Some of the films for which he is best-known are ‘Shine’, ‘Shakespeare in Love’, ‘Quills’, The King’s Speech’, and ‘The Life and Death of Peter Sellers’. He is also

Geoffrey Rush Steps Down from Australia Screen Industry Academy Amidst Allegations
See full article at TVovermind.com »

The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Sexy Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Y Tu Mamá También’ to ‘Blue is the Warmest Color’
It’s no secret that sex sells, and movies are no exception. But while plenty of films like to show gratuitous sex, they’re not always very good. That’s a problem, since movies have the power to shape not only the cultural norms, but personal ones. And what could be more personal than sex? Sexuality is an integral part of the human experience, not some sensational or shameful ploy to sell tickets (though it doesn’t hurt).

That’s why we think it’s important to single out the very best films that also happen to be incredibly sexy, titillating, and provocative. These are not only some of our favorite films in general, but they’re films that celebrate the broad spectrum of human sexuality while telling stories as cinematic as they are personal. Some don’t have any sex scenes at all, while some are notoriously near-pornographic. When these movies do show sex it is always in service of the story, and always in order to challenge, subvert, or celebrate contemporary beliefs about sexuality.

Turn on (and get turned on) by our list of the 25 best sexy movies of the 21st century (well, so far). You know you want to.

25. “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (2008)

Undeniably sexy and amusing at once, Woody Allen’s 2008 Spain-set dramedy delights in pushing its various players into all sorts of romantic permutations and configurations. Anchored by Scarlett Johansson in a sneaky performance as the eponymous Cristina (pre-breakout Rebecca Hall is her best pal Vicky), the film follows a pair of friends as they meet and make lots of love with the beguiling Juan Antonio (Javier Bardem), who isn’t at all thrown off by the possibility of having two lovely ladies in his bed. In fact, he’s got another one to think about too, his free-spirited ex-wife (Penelope Cruz), who he just can’t get out of his head (or heart). On the surface, “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” is a dead sexy romp about free-wheeling love-makers (complete with plenty of naughty bits), but it’s also a film that boldly explores issues of fluidity and fidelity with an uncharacteristically easy touch. -Ke

24. “Shortbus” (2006)

With its three-person blowjob circle, non-simulated sex scenes including ejaculation, and close-up of a pee stream unleashing into a bathtub, “Shortbus” is not for everyone. It’s an ambitious film, one that attempts to have fun, be sexy, and tell a good story. If anyone could pull it off, it would be the man behind “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” John Cameron Mitchell. “Shortbus” feels as much like an ensemble comedy as a playful experiment, though the two main characters are a sex therapist who’s never had an orgasm and a retired gay sex worker experimenting with opening up his relationship. With their partners, they both begin attending a weekly artist and sex salon, each hoping inspiration will strike. Mitchell wanted to use sex in new cinematic ways, “because it’s too interesting to be left to porn.” If it’s interesting sex you want, “Shortbus” has got it. -Jd

23. “Brokeback Mountain” (2005)

The end of this film is so movingly profound that your memory of it might not be that it was all that sexy. The love between these two men, buried under their rugged cowboy exteriors, ends with what can only be described as a sense of life-defining tragedy. Yet it is those brief moments where they let themselves go and unleash their animalistic passion, which “Crouching Tiger” director Ang Lee captures in his normal visceral fashion, that add a level of eroticism and physically affection that nearly makes all the pain worth it. Ennis and Jack rotate from almost fighting, as they pull at each others’ denim-clad exterior, to moments of being naked and incredibly tender. It’s virtually every cowboy fantasy rolled up into one. That they can only be themselves in the privacy of the great outdoors makes everything that much more liberating. Watching this film in 2005 felt taboo and rebellious, which resulted in a charged atmosphere in packed mainstream cineplexes around the country. -Co

22. “In the Cut” (2003)

Jane Campion’s handle on female desire has always been one of her best attributes as a director (and she’s got a lot of them), but nothing in her filmography is as overtly sexy and emotionally challenging as her 2003 Meg Ryan-starrer “In the Cut” (and that includes “The Piano,” which has a sexiness and eroticism all its own). Our first introduction to Ryan’s character is rooted in her coming to heady terms with her own sexuality, a theme that carries over throughout the often grisly drama. Increasingly drawn to Mark Ruffalo as a moody detective looking to solve a local murder that Frannie is tangentially involved in, Ryan’s character pushes the boundaries of “acceptable” desire. It’s a theme that Campion giddily plays into with some of modern cinema’s most satisfying and profound sex scenes, many of which center on — gasp — Frannie’s own pleasure over that of Ruffalo’s character. -Ke

21. “Hustle & Flow” (2005)

Craig Brewer’s crowdpleaser about a pimp dreaming of music fame is anchored by strong performances from Terrence Howard, Taraji P. Henson, and Taryn Manning. Howard plays Djay, while Henson and Manning are Shug and Nola, two of his girls. Hot-tempered and passionate, Djay begins making tracks with his friend Key (Anthony Anderson), and discovers he has a gift for lyrics. The catchy original soundtrack helps sell the story, as Djay’s songs seem to actually have a chance at getting radio play. While the strip club setting provides ample shots of semi-nude women, Djay and Shug’s sweet romance gives the film its emotional core and shows a softer side to Djay (and his temper). Their undeniable chemistry leads the previously timid Shug to throw down a sexy hook, her raspy croon on “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” making Henson’s star power glaringly obvious. -Jd

20. “Beyond the Lights” (2014)

Chemistry is the name of the game in Gina Prince-Bythewood’s freight-train fast music industry romance, which pairs up rising starlet Gugu Mbatha-Raw (pure charm) alongside pre-“Birth of a Nation” Nate Parker. The pair exhibit major fireworks from the start, imagining Mbatha-Raw as hot new pop star Noni Jean, a big talent who is dangerously close to burning out and fading away, before she falls into the protective arms Parker’s do-gooder cop, Kaz Nicol. Prince-Bythewood’s film cannily sneaks in big questions about fame and the entertainment industry, along with issues regarding what’s actually sexy (Noni Jean is frequently kitted out in teensy costumes that make record execs happy, while diminishing her own humanity with every stitch), deep issues that are lovingly cradled by full-scale love story. When the pair finally give into their obvious attraction, “Beyond the Lights” pulls out the big guns, all gauzy love scenes and one particularly hot trip to Mexico, but the film maintains its sensuality by remembering that nothing is so sexy as mutual respect and admiration. -Ke

19. “In the Mood for Love” (2000)

Every Wong Kar-wai movie contains a kind of visual sensuality in every frame, but “In the Mood for Love” goes one step further — its slow-burning romance between a pair of would-be lovers who live across the hall from each other in sixties-era Hong Kong is rich with unobtainable desire. Much is left unsaid and unachieved about the fantasy of an extramarital affair shared by Chow Mo-wan (Tony Leung) and Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung), but the hints of attraction between them, unfolding in small gestures and passing glances, imbues each scene with the intensity of emotions specific to a period of repression. It’s a grand tragedy of issed opportunities framed by erotic implications. —Eric Kohn

18. “Ex Machina” (2014)

If you like high-tech voyeurism and intellectual sparring, you might find Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi thriller unearthing some hidden desires. An affable young programmer, Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson), is invited to the secluded jungle home of the CEO of his company, Nathan (Oscar Isaac) to participate in a top-secret experiment. Nathan wants to know if the cyborg he has been developing, Ava (Alicia Vikander) can convince Caleb that she has real consciousness. The tension is ripe between Nathan and Caleb as each attempts to alternately impress and control the other, but it is Caleb’s obsession with saving Ava that raises questions about the hero myth. Ava is the embodiment of male fantasy, trapped within a body invented to please and serve. As the two men fight over who best understands her mind, it turns out Ava was pulling the strings all along. There’s nothing sexier than a woman in charge. -Jd

17. “Quills” (2000)

It’s easy enough to get sucked into “Quills” based on the promise of Joaquin Phoenix playing an earnest (and incredibly sexy) young priest tempted by his attraction to a chambermaid. But somehow, much like Kate Winslet’s Madeline, we fall under the spell of the charismatic Geoffrey Rush, who plays his role as the Marquis de Sade with a deliciously dirty panache befitting the notorious French writer. The Marquis’ libertine ways run counter to the no-nonsense Royer-Collard (Michael Caine), who takes over the asylum with the intention of stifling the writer’s creative output. But even his own wife is no match for the words of the Marquis, which ooze both sensuality and liberty. Before long, any initial apprehension to the Marquis de Sade (he is a dirty old man, after all) is fully given over to the hope that his debauchery will win out, and that his desire, as well as that of Madeline and Coulmier (Phoenix) will be fully fulfilled — even though we know this is impossible. -Jr

16. “A Bigger Splash” (2015)

Watching “A Bigger Splash” feels like observing a sizzling chess game of attraction. Luca Guadagnino sticks Ralph Fiennes, Tilda Swinton, Matthias Schoenaerts, and Dakota Johnson on the world’s most gorgeous island and lets the sparks fly. Swinton plays a world-famous rock singer vacationing with her lover, a chiseled Schoenaerts who is practically a walking and talking sculpture of male beauty. Their time together is disrupted by the arrival of the rocker’s former lover and his daughter, a promiscuous young 22-year-old. Each character is so ready to succumb to sexual desire and so pent up with sexual attraction that Guadagnino creates the ultimate emotional orgy. The fun is in seeing how each person uses their sexuality to outsmart the next. You’ll be seduced from the first frame to the last. It feels like you’re watching each actor for the very first time. -Zs

On the next page: wild adventures in Florida, some of the century’s most jaw-dropping pairings, and at least one murder.

Related storiesAbdellatif Kechiche is Auctioning Off 'Blue is the Warmest Color' Palme d'Or to Finance New FilmNetflix's New Ratings System Is a Terrible Idea13 Essential Lgbt Indies From the Post-'Brokeback Mountain' Era
See full article at Indiewire »

Star Trek: the franchise's big turning points

Michael Reed Mar 24, 2017

Examining some of the key turning points in the Star Trek series, with the projects that never quite made it to the screen...

“History is replete with turning points. You must have faith.” - Spock

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Star Trek has been with us for over 50 years in one form or another. It started in 1964 with the filming of the pilot episode of the original series, and it has continued to the present day, through films and subsequent TV series, along with other mediums such as books and video games.

We’re principally interested in the core of the franchise here, the TV series and films, and we’re going to take a look at some 'what if...' possibilities of projects that almost happened but didn’t. If you’re reading
See full article at Den of Geek »

Art of Motion Picture Costume Designs Draws Oscar-Nominated Frocks and Suits

Art of Motion Picture Costume Designs Draws Oscar-Nominated Frocks and Suits
Perhaps the only thing more spectacular than the costumes at the opening night of the 25th Art of Motion Picture Costume Design exhibition were the attendees, dressed to the nines in elaborate hats and intricate sequined cocktail dresses. The costumes on display at the exhibition, sectioned off into groups representative of the year’s most glamour-filled and best-designed films, mimicked the guests’ glad rags in style and flamboyance, expanding on their luxe extravagance and drama.

Fans of film fashion will be able to check out the exhibit until April 22. The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, located in downtown Los Angeles, charges no fee for admission to the three-room show, where guests can wander through 1950s Pittsburgh (à la “Fences”), Underland (“Alice Through the Looking Glass”), all the way to ancient Japan (“Kubo and the Two Strings”). Oscar-nominated costumes from “Allied” (designed by Joanna Johnston), “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” (Colleen Atwood,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Fantastic Beasts,’ ‘Live By Night,’ ‘Allied’ Among Costume Design Oscar Contenders

‘Fantastic Beasts,’ ‘Live By Night,’ ‘Allied’ Among Costume Design Oscar Contenders
From 17th Century Japan to the Wizarding World of J.K. Rowling, this year’s costume design Oscar race is typically wide-ranging, featuring many of the top talents in the field.

Period pieces always stand out, and one of the most vibrant displays this year is Jacqueline West’s work on Ben Affleck’s gangster picture “Live By Night.” Outfitting the somber hues of Depression Era Boston and the brighter casual colors of Tampa, West — a three-time nominee for “Quills,” “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” and “The Revenant” — was given a unique opportunity and ran with it.

Related

How Sharen Davis Went From Actress to Oscar-Nominated Costume Designer

Live By Night” could run into trouble with critics, but thankfully this is a branch that doesn’t adhere to critical approval. That’s good news for films like “Rules Don’t Apply” and “Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children,” too,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gods Of Egypt review

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Gerard Butler shouts and transforms into a robot in Alex Proyas’ fantasy Gods Of Egypt. Ryan reviews a screamingly odd film...

Ancient Egypt - a land of pyramids, colossal statues and unconvincing scorpions. Did you know that, in the time of the pharoahs, gods lived among ordinary mortals and could transform into huge, fire-spouting robots? Director Alex ProyasGods Of Egypt may have been demolished by critics when it appeared in the Us earlier this year, but it’s certainly educational.

Proyas previously brought us such dark and moody delights as The Crow and Dark City, but Gods Of Egypt is completely unlike anything he’s made before. It’s big, it’s camp, it’s awash with CGI which varies in quality from shot to shot. In style and tone, it belongs in that same odd category of action fantasy films as Louis Leterrier’s Clash Of The Titans
See full article at Den of Geek »

'The Revenant' Oscar Contender Jacqueline West Creates Scholarship for Native American Youth (Exclusive)

'The Revenant' Oscar Contender Jacqueline West Creates Scholarship for Native American Youth (Exclusive)
Oscar-nominated costume designer Jacqueline West and the Fashion Institute Of Design & Merchandising have created a scholarship for an outstanding Native American interested in the study of fashion or costume design. The Scholarship is open for entry now and will be awarded in early Fall 2016. In order to encourage youth of Native descent to enter the world of costume design and to raise awareness of careers in the design arena from fashion to costume design for theatre and film, the Scholarship includes a visiting internship with West. After a career as a fashion designer with her own label, sold in such department stores as Barney's and Fred Siegel, West in the late 80's started to create costumes for film. Since then her costume designs have been nominated for three Oscars, including "Quills" (2001), "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" (2009) and finally, "The Revenant." The scholarship is open to youths of Native American descent.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Revenant's Costume Designer Jacqueline West on Terrence Malick, Ben Affleck, and... Anaïs Nin?

Jacqueline West at the premiere of The Revenant.© Frazer Harrison for Getty ImagesClothing was always in her blood though Costume Design came later. Two time Oscar nominee Jacqueline West (Quills, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), the daughter of an avante garde designer, originally pursued fashion. After building a successful clothing line of her own her career made a sudden fate-filled turn in the late 80s via a favor for a personal friend, the director Philip Kaufman.

Her filmography in the subsequent 25 years has been a grab bag of film genres --  her latest The Revenant (2015) is a 180 from Henry & June (1990) you must agree -- but the consistent throughline is that she's in demand with the auteur set. She's worked repeatedly with Terrence Malick, David Fincher, Philip Kaufman, and Ben Affleck. The Revenant marks her first, though one assumes not last, collaboration with Alejandro González Iñárritu. To get in the right mindset,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscars: ‘Mad Max,’ ‘Cinderella,’ ‘Danish Girl’ Highlight Costume Design Race

Oscars: ‘Mad Max,’ ‘Cinderella,’ ‘Danish Girl’ Highlight Costume Design Race
Halloween is around the corner, so surely film fans are trying to decide what 2015 movie-themed get-up to rock at this party or that. There are lots of options this year: Whitey Bulger, Bb-8, Imperator Furiosa, etc. Perhaps today’s analysis of the best costume design Oscar race will get the synapses firing for last-minute shoppers.

Just as in best production design, covered last week, the costume designers — who finally got their own branch a few years ago — respond to ornate period and fantasy detail. Contemporary work very rarely figures in. So on the period side, we have to again start with “The Danish Girl.” Outfitted by Paco Delgado, who was Oscar-nominated for “Les Misérables” three years ago, the film is particularly notable in this field given Eddie Redmayne’s on-screen transition to transgender pioneer Lili Elbe.

Sandy Powell has 10 nominations and three wins (“Shakespeare in Love,” “The Aviator,” “The Young Victoria”) to her credit.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mel Gibson: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

Mel Gibson, whom I interviewed for Venice Magazine in late 2000, was my first real childhood hero I sat down with. If you were a Gen-x male, Mel Gibson was the closest thing we had to Paul Newman, Steve McQueen and Sean Connery: a guy's guy whom guys wanted to emulate and women wanted to copulate. If you were a guy who liked girls, the math in the previous equation was pretty simple: be like Mel. Sadly, Gibson's life has taken a very public turn for the worse in the last decade, since his personal legal and troubles stemming from a 2006 DUI arrest in Malibu were made public, one from which his image has yet to fully recover. It was an unfortunate fall from grace for a guy who literally had Hollywood, and the world, in the palm of his hand after sweeping the 1995 Oscars with his box office smash "Braveheart.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

How Biochemist Turned Rookie Director Kimberly Levin Made Indie Farm Drama 'Runoff'

How Biochemist Turned Rookie Director Kimberly Levin Made Indie Farm Drama 'Runoff'
Theater and television writer/director Kimberly Levin didn't wait for CAA to raise financing. She forged ahead with the drama "Runoff," filmed near her hometown Louisville, Kentucky. The film made its world premiere at the Los Angeles Film Festival last year, and opens from Monterey Media this Friday. Levin, who is trained as a biochemist, is a member of the Kentucky Film Board. She raised equity financing in her home state, where friends and family are offering locations. With help from executive producer Julia Chasman ("25th Hour," "Quills"), who discovered the script while judging the Nicholls screenwriting contest, Levin made the film under both DGA and SAG Ultra Low Budget agreements (which gets actors $100 a day plus commission against an eventual sale of the film), making it possible to film the story locally with scale and scope for less than $1 million. Set in a rural farming community, "Runoff" tells the story of Betty.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Posterity’ Theater Review: ‘I Am My Own Wife’ Author Wrestles With the Legacy of Another Playwright

  • The Wrap
“Posterity,” an earnest drama about Henrik Ibsen and his fellow countryman, a struggling Norwegian sculptor named Gustav Vigeland, is the kind of play that Louis B. Mayer and Jack Warner acquired during the golden age of Hollywood. Biopics about revered artists and scientists gave class to MGM and Warner’s line-up of screwball comedies, mindless musicals, and gangster pictures, which of course, went on to outlive the movies about Chopin, Pasteur, and the Bronte sisters. Art rarely survives when it’s delivered with a capital A. Doug Wright, author of the much acclaimed “Quills” and “I Am My Own Wife,
See full article at The Wrap »

The Precedent for an Eddie Redmayne or Michael Keaton Oscar Win

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

With Michael Keaton winning the Golden Globe for best actor in a musical or comedy and Eddie Redmayne winning for best actor in a drama, both men continue establishing themselves as the frontrunners in this year’s lead actor race at the Oscars.

Though not new to films, Redmayne starred in Oscar-nominated films such as Elizabeth: The Golden Age (2008) and Les Miserables (2012). His performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, however, propelled him to widespread acclaim and put him on the radar. He is one of four best actor nominees — along with Keaton, Benedict Cumberbatch and Steve Carell — to receive their first nomination this year.

For most of his career, Keaton was known for his comedic roles, such as Mr. Mom (1983) and Beetlejuice (1988), and for his turn as Batman in Tim Burton’s Batman (1989) and Batman Returns (1992). These roles earned Keaton praise and
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Edgar Wright On Remembering Billie Whitelaw: 1932 – 2014

Thn were sad to hear the news that prolific actress Billie Whitelaw had passed away aged 82 yesterday, and as well as offering our heartfelt condolences to her family and friends, we wanted to share this wonderful memory piece from Edgar Wright, the director who got to work with Billie on her very final film in Hot Fuzz in 2007.

Billie was a star of the stage and screen for 64 years having making her debut treading the boards in 1950, before also sharing her work on the big screen in 1953. Hitchcock directed her in Frenzy (1972), and you’ll also know her in the likes of The Omen (1976), Quills and many, many more titles in television, theatre and cinema. She was also a muse to Samuel Beckett, one of the most important and original writers of all-time, and had a very distinct influence on his work and he loved her work in return.

We
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Billie Whitelaw dies by Jennie Kermode - 2014-12-21 21:39:45

Billie Whitelaw in The Omen

Billie Whitelaw, star of stage and screen over a remarkable 65 years, has died at the age of 82. A hit with colleagues and audiences alike, she progressed from The Secret Garden and Dixon Of Dock Green to lend her talents to films including Frenzy, The Omen, An Unsuitable Job for a Woman, The Krays, Quills and Hot Fuzz. She won two BAFTAs and was also much admired for her stage work, through which she became the muse of Samuel Beckett, and for her voice acting, which included extensive work for radio and fantasy film The Dark Crystal.

Whitelaw died in a London nursing home. She is survived by Matthew Muller, her son by actor and writer Robert Muller....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Camerimage unveils competition line-up, juries

  • ScreenDaily
Camerimage unveils competition line-up, juries
Birdman, Fury and Leviathan among main competition titles; Roland Joffé to preside over main jury.

Alejandro G Ińárritu, Yimou Zhang, Mike Leigh and Jean-Marc Vallée are among the directors with films screening in competition at the 22nd Camerimage (Nov 15-22), the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography.

The main competition at the festival, held in the Polish city of Bydgoszcz, comprises:

Alejandro G Ińárritu’s Birdman (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance); USA, 2014; Cinematographer: Emmanuel Lubezki

Yimou Zhang’s Coming Home (Gui lai); China, 2014; Cinematographer: Zhao Xiaoding

Richard Raymond’s Desert Dancer; UK, 2014; Cinematographer: Carlos Catalán Alucha

Lech J. Majewski’s Field of Dogs - Onirica (Onirica - Psie pole); Poland, 2014; Cinematographers: Paweł Tybora and Lech J. Majewski

Krzysztof Zanussi’s Foreign Body (Obce cialo); Poland, Italy, Russia, 2014; Cinematographer: Piotr Niemyjski

David Ayer’s Fury; USA, 2014; Cinematographer: Roman Vasyanov

Tate Taylor’s Get on Up; USA, 2014; Cinematographer: Stephen Goldblatt

Łukasz Palkowski’s Gods (Bogowie); Poland, 2014; Cinematographer:
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Birdman, Imitation Game to open Camerimage

  • ScreenDaily
Birdman, Imitation Game to open Camerimage
Awards contenders to receive Polish premieres at cinematography festival.

The 22nd Camerimage (Nov 15-22) is to open with the Polish premieres of Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) and The Imitation Game.

The cinematography festival, held in the Polish city of Bydgoszcz, will screen Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s Birdman at the Opera Nova on Nov 15 - more than three months ahead of its Polish release on Feb 27 through Imperial CinePix.

The film, starring Michael Keaton as an actor looking to relaunch his career, also plays in the main competition at Camerimage. Emmanuel Lubezki was cinematographer.

Second World War drama The Imitation Game, directed by Morten Tyldum and starring Benedict Cumberbatch as codebreaker Alan Turing, will be released by Forum Film Poland on Jan 16.

Birdman debuted at Venice while The Imitation Game bowed at Toronto. Both are expected to be heavyweight contenders during awards season.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Camerimage has also announced that Philip Kaufman is to
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Right Stuff’ Helmer Philip Kaufman to Receive Camerimage Award

‘Right Stuff’ Helmer Philip Kaufman to Receive Camerimage Award
London — Writer-director Philip Kaufman, whose credits include “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” and “The Right Stuff,” will receive a lifetime achievement award for directing at Camerimage, a film festival that celebrates the art of cinematography.

The award recognizes filmmakers who have “changed the way movies are made with their creativity, visual skills and passion for their craft,” the fest said. “Kaufman is an artist who is not afraid to supplement genre features with deeper analyses of the human condition,” it added.

His first screenplay and directorial debut was the comedy “Goldstein,” which shared the Cannes Film Festival Prix de la Nouvelle Critique with Bernardo Bertolucci’s “Prima Della Rivoluzione” in 1964.

Next up was comedy “Fearless Frank,” which featured a comic-book hero played by Jon Voight, and revisionist Western “The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid,” starring Robert Duvall as Jesse James.

Drama “The White Dawn” marked Kaufman’s first collaboration with the cinematographer Michael Chapman.
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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