6.5/10
3,208
59 user 2 critic

The Devil's Arithmetic (1999)

Not Rated | | Drama, Fantasy, War | TV Movie 28 March 1999
A 16-year-old American girl with an apathetic view towards her Jewish family history finds herself pulled through time into 1941 to a small Polish village where the Nazi have just began their genocidal propaganda.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (teleplay)
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3,987 ( 159)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
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Rabbi
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Leonore Stern
...
Aunt Eva
Lilo Baur ...
Mina
Nitzan Sharron ...
Ariel
...
...
Shmuel
Kirsty McFarland ...
Yetta
Rachel Roddy ...
Esther
Ieva Jackeviciute ...
Miriam
Philip Rham ...
Commandant Krieger
Daniel Rausch ...
Officer Steinbach
Polina Soloveicik ...
Sarah (as Paulina Soloveicik)
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Storyline

This is another telling of the holocaust, but this time from the perspective of a modern teenage girl who only grudgingly accepts the Jewish traditions, but when she is asked to "open the front door" as part of the Seder feast finds herself, not unlike Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, to have entered the 1940's and has stepped into the life of a prisoner in one of the German death camps where she experiences all of its horrors firsthand. Written by BOB STEBBINS <stebinsbob@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Live to tell

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 March 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La aritmética del diablo  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

By far the most famous and successful movie in which actor Paul Freeman has appeared in his career is Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), in which he plays a French archaeologist who collaborates with the Nazis. In this film, he plays an Orthodox rabbi who is imprisoned in a concentration camp by the Nazis. See more »

Quotes

Hannah Stern: What I still don't understand is how so many people could be punished, men, women, and babies who didn't even have a chance to think about God.
Aunt Eva: Once I would have said you have to ask the Nazis. But now I know better, and I say you have to ask God. There is no one else. Do you know how to talk to God?
Hannah Stern: So quietly that only God can hear me.
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Connections

References The Wizard of Oz (1939) See more »

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User Reviews

This is a fine film for its intended audience.
7 April 1999 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Overall, the films art direction, cinematography and story line remained consistently good throughout the film. Not knowing the book, I cannot comment on its accuracy. I can say that it kept my attention though out the film. Even though I wanted to see Toto leap up into Hannah's arms in the end, it was still a moving conclusion.


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