Numerous women stand at several rows of tables where they appear to be wrapping tape around some devices, presumably coils. Male supervisors walk down the aisles, observing the women's work.
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Numerous women stand at several rows of tables where they appear to be wrapping tape around some devices, presumably coils. Male supervisors walk down the aisles, observing the women's work.

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Genres:

Documentary | Short

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Release Date:

May 1904 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Taping Coils, Westinghouse Works  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Connections

Edited into Westinghouse Works (1904) See more »

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Workmanlike
2 August 2009 | by (www.2020-movie-reviews.com) – See all my reviews

D. W. Griffith's future cinematographer Billy Bitzer made a number of short films showing the manufacturing process at the Westinghouse works and giving a general overview of operations. On some of these films he demonstrated a certain degree of imagination in his choice of shots, even going so far as to film from a gantry crane as it slowly traverses the factory on one occasion.

This film, however, gives no indication whatsoever that any thought or care was given to the filming - the camera is simply placed in front of several rows of women who are presumably taping coils judging from the title, although the camera is positioned at a distance from the 'action' which makes it difficult to see what is going on. You get the impression that films like this were made purely to fill some kind of production quota.


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