A shuttle is launched into space to release a new satellite. When an explosion occurs the crew has to think of a way to get back to Earth without atmospheric pressure (max q) crushing the damaged shuttle.

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(teleplay), (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Clay Jarvis (as Bill Campbell)
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Rena Winter
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Scott Hines
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Jonah Randall
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Karen Daniels
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Don Mitchum
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Elliot Henschel
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Oz Gilbert (as Kevin Mcnulty)
Leslie Horan ...
Melissa Hines
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Bob Matthews
Greg Michaels ...
Rusty Porter
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John Daniels
Tracy New ...
Pierson
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Emily (as B.J. Harrison)
Neil Denis ...
Michael Daniels
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Storyline

A shuttle is launched into space to release a new satellite. When an explosion occurs the crew has to think of a way to get back to Earth without atmospheric pressure (max q) crushing the damaged shuttle.

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Taglines:

The Ultimate Test of Courage

Genres:

Adventure | Sci-Fi

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Details

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Release Date:

19 November 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Max Q: Emergency Landing  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Max Q is indeed the point of maximum dynamic pressure on a vehicle during launch. It's also the name of the rock band whose members are all astronauts. See more »

Goofs

A character refers to DC-10 pilots shifting fuel to steer their crippled airliner, and duplicates the maneuver in the space shuttle. In the incident to which he refers, United Airlines Flight 232, the pilots steered by shifting engine power, not by shifting fuel. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Give it a miss
26 September 2004 | by (Melbourne, Australia) – See all my reviews

This film laboured along with some of the most predictable story lines and shallow characters ever seen. The writer obviously bought the playbook "How to write a space disaster movie" and followed it play by play. In particular, the stereo-typical use of astronauts talking to their loved ones from outer space - putting on a brave show in the face of disaster - has been done time and time again.

Max Q appears to have been written in the hope that the producers would throw $50 million at the project. But, judging by the latter half of the film which contained numerous lame attempts at special effects, the producers could only muster $50 thousand. To learn that the film was nominated for a "Special Visual Effects" Emmy has me absolutely gob-smacked.

I think a handful of high school students with a pass in Media Studies could have created more believable effects!

And the plot holes are too numerous to mention. But I will pick one out as an example. Now, I'm no NASA expert, but surely it's highly implausible that a worker attached to the shuttle simulator would suddenly hold a position of power in the control room when things start to go pear-shaped with the program. Surely there is someone more experienced at Mission Control who the Program Director would call on rather than a twenty-nine year old who has not been in the control room before.

The only saving grace for this film is the work of Bill Campbell. He manages to make a good attempt at salvaging something out of the train wreck that is this script.

I give this film 2 out of 10, with the above-average work of Bill Campbell in the lead role saving it from a lower mark.


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