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Exclusive Interview – Director Mark Gill on his Morrissey biopic England is Mine, his creative influences, and more

Alex Moreland speaks to Mark Gill, director of Morrissey biopic England is Mine

So, first of all – can you tell us a little bit about the development of England is Mine? What was your starting point?

Well, my starting point was growing up in the same area of Manchester as Morrissey – literally a couple of streets away – discovering the band when I was a teenage lad, just falling in love with that music really, that voice. I just thought his lyrics were… Like a million other people speak to you directly about your life. And it always stuck with me. I just thought, having grown up in that area of Manchester, which is not a ghetto by any stretch of the imagination, but I always wondered how he managed to survive it. So, that was my starting point. I never really wanted to make a film about The Smiths. It
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’

Film Review: ‘Phantom Thread’
Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis), the svelte and smoldering middle-aged British fashion designer at the heart of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” is a man who seems to have everything he wants. He lives in a splendid five-story London townhouse with walls the color of cream, and he works there too, starting early, sitting with his tea and pastries as he does the day’s sketches, already possessed by his reverent labor. He’s a dressmaker who works with the fervor of an artist — dreaming, obsessing, perfecting. At night he sips martinis at parties and restaurants, rubbing shoulders with the countesses and wealthy London ladies who are his clients, and he’s also a devoted serial womanizer who falls for — and discards — one comely model muse after another. (As the film opens, his current flame is flickering out.) “Phantom Thread” is set in 1955, but Reynolds, in his posh and pampered upper-crust way, has the air
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Phantom Thread’ Review: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Riveting ’50s Romance Is a Screwball Comedy In Disguise

‘Phantom Thread’ Review: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Riveting ’50s Romance Is a Screwball Comedy In Disguise
Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmmaking swings between ambitions — sweeping riffs on history (“Boogie Nights,” “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master”) and peculiar, enlightening character studies (“Hard Eight,” “Punch Drunk Love”). His ambling Thomas Pynchon adaptation “Inherent Vice” tried to merge those modalities, but “Phantom Thread” really pulls it off, with his most concise, endearing works in years, one that plumbs dark and mysterious Andersonian depths to unearth a surprising degree of warmth lurking within.

It also surprises with his strongest female lead in two decades of movies. Though some of the hype around “Phantom Thread” stems from Daniel Day-Lewis’ announcement of his retirement after this role, the world’s most revered Method Actor meets his match alongside stunning discovery Vicky Krieps. There’s no doubt that Anderson has crafted a memorable finale for his “There Will Be Blood” collaborator in British dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock, a stern perfectionist in his mid-
See full article at Indiewire »

Five Of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Films Are Set To Tour The UK In 35mm Format

Park Circus have announced that they are set to tour five classic films from auteur filmmaker Paul Thomas Anderson, all presented in 35mm prints in the the new year.

The tour coincides with the release of Anderson’s new film, Phantom Thread, an illuminating portrait both of an artist on a creative journey, and the women who keep his world running, which Universal Pictures UK will release in cinemas on 2 February 2018.

Paul Thomas Anderson said: “This is the kind of thing you dream of as a filmmaker – the continued showing of your work in its native format in places that love and cherish films. Pinch me. No, don’t”

The tour will visit selected independent cinemas across the UK and includes Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love, There Will Be Blood, and Inherent Vice.

The tour starts on 4 January 2018 at Light House Dublin with the prints visiting venues including London’s Prince Charles Cinema,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Record Opener ‘Disaster Artist’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Lead Specialty Box Office Surge

  • Indiewire
Record Opener ‘Disaster Artist’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Lead Specialty Box Office Surge
The hits keep on coming. Both “The Disaster Artist” (A24) and “The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight) opened strong, despite the usual strong-fall off in post-Thanksgiving audiences. Last year the month of November saw only one specialized release, “Manchester By the Sea,” pull an opening platform per theater average over $60,000. This year has already seen five.

The Disaster Artist” (in 11 markets) showed the best performance in New York/Los Angeles of any title this year (nearly $120,000 per theater), besting last weekend’s numbers for “Call Me By Your Name” (Sony Pictures Classics). They join other Oscar-bound strong openers including “Lady Bird” (A24) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Fox Searchlight).

This marks unprecedented strength over such a short period, with “Lady Bird” and “Three Billboards” already performing well in wider release. At some point exhibitors are going to be challenged to handle so many hits (all will not go wide
See full article at Indiewire »

National Board of Review Boosts ‘The Post’ and ‘Get Out,’ While Netflix and Amazon Struggle

National Board of Review Boosts ‘The Post’ and ‘Get Out,’ While Netflix and Amazon Struggle
Every November, two New York awards groups — Independent Feature Project’s Gotham Awards and scholastic cinephile association The National Board of Review — put the spotlight on some lucky winners, boosting their Oscar chances. The ones left off aren’t hurt, necessarily; it only means they need to nab more attention down the pike.

Read More:National Board of Review 2017 Winners: ‘The Post’ Named Best Film, Greta Gerwig is Best Director Winners:

Best Film, Actor, and Actress went to Steven Spielberg’s late-breaking true thriller “The Post” (Fox, December 22), which balances a resonant valentine to analog journalism with a moving portrait of an heroic woman publisher who put free speech ahead of business.

Meryl Streep will continue to win accolades for this sensitive portrayal of The Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, a socially prominent widow who inherited her husband’s newspaper and learned to navigate the nation’s corridors of power with
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

National Board of Review Boosts ‘The Post’ and ‘Get Out,’ While Netflix and Amazon Struggle

  • Indiewire
National Board of Review Boosts ‘The Post’ and ‘Get Out,’ While Netflix and Amazon Struggle
Every November, two New York awards groups — Independent Feature Project’s Gotham Awards and scholastic cinephile association The National Board of Review — put the spotlight on some lucky winners, boosting their Oscar chances. The ones left off aren’t hurt, necessarily; it only means they need to nab more attention down the pike.

Read More:National Board of Review 2017 Winners: ‘The Post’ Named Best Film, Greta Gerwig is Best Director Winners:

Best Film, Actor, and Actress went to Steven Spielberg’s late-breaking true thriller “The Post” (Fox, December 22), which balances a resonant valentine to analog journalism with a moving portrait of an heroic woman publisher who put free speech ahead of business.

Meryl Streep will continue to win accolades for this sensitive portrayal of The Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, a socially prominent widow who inherited her husband’s newspaper and learned to navigate the nation’s corridors of power with
See full article at Indiewire »

The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today

The 20 Best Director-Cinematographer Collaborations Working Today
The gravitational pull that exists between great directors and great cinematographers is natural. Many of the best pairings throughout film history have been project based, with the director or producer picking a cinematographer to achieve a specific look for a particular film. There’s a difference between providing a talented cinematographer with the perfect platform to apply their skills and a director-cinematographer collaboration that elevates the work of both artists, regardless of material.

This list is less about identifying the best looking films of the era – although many are here – and more about celebrating collaborations that have allowed many of the best filmmakers working today to fully express themselves on the big screen.

Dir: Paul Thomas Anderson, Dp: Robert Elswit

The first time Paul Thomas Anderson did not work with Elswitt – “The Master,” shot by Mihai Mălaimare Jr. – the results were (thankfully) great, but it’s fascinating that the director
See full article at Indiewire »

Chance the Rapper's Werewolf Horror Comedy 'Slice' Drops Awesome Animated Teaser Trailer

Are you ready to get sliced?

Chance the Rapper is getting into the acting game with his role in the upcoming horror comedy Slice, and the first real teaser trailer is here just in time for Halloween. 

Production company A24, which has been behind some of the most mind-bending horror and experimental films in recent years, dropped a primarily animated trailer, and it looks amazing even in its simplicity,

While the trailer doesn't give us a lot to go on in terms of plot, it does give us a passing glimpse at Chance and some of his co-stars -- who include Atlanta and Deadpool 2 star Zazie Beetz, The League's Paul Scheer, and Stranger Things actor Joe Keery.

More: Your Alternative Halloween Viewing Guide: Hidden Horror Gems to Make Movie Night Frighteningly Fun

Chance first teased his involvement in the project a year ago with an incredibly brief clip showing him sitting on a moped, which he captioned
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘Phantom Thread’: Everything You Need to Know About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Movie

‘Phantom Thread’: Everything You Need to Know About Daniel Day-Lewis’ Final Movie
The Oscar race isn’t over until the last movie screens, and this year one of the final contenders to be unveiled will be “Phantom Thread.” The drama marks the hugely anticipated reunion between Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis, who last worked together a decade ago on “There Will Be Blood.” The Upton Sinclair-inspired drama earned eight Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director, and gave Day-Lewis his second trophy for Best Actor (he’d make history and win a third for “Lincoln” five years later), so anyone would be foolish to underestimate just how big “Phantom Thread” will be this awards season.

Focus Features has been keeping a majority of the details surrounding the movie under lock and key, although the official trailer was finally released on October 23, teasing a gorgeously shot drama about the romantic obsessions of a self-destructive artist. “Phantom Thread” seems to operating
See full article at Indiewire »

Phantom Thread Trailer: Paul Thomas Anderson, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Fine 1950s Clothing

Paul Thomas Anderson makes mesmerizing movies. I didn't see Hard Eight for years, unfortunately, but Boogie Nights entranced me through multiple viewings. I couldn't stop watching it - every time it appeared uncut on cable I was drawn back to it. And the same for Magnolia -- even though I pretty much hated it! Seeing Punch-Drunk Love on opening day in a packed Los Angeles theater left me speechless, and then absorbing There Will Be Blood at Fantastic Fest from a seat that was far too close to the screen near popped every blood vein in my head. (A later outdoor viewing on one of its West Texas filming locations was just as memorable.) Watching The Master, first on 35mm, and then on 70mm with...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Phantom Thread trailer: Daniel Day-Lewis' final film

Joseph Baxter Oct 24, 2017

Daniel Day-Lewis is an eccentric fashion designer for the elite in the Phantom Thread trailer...

Daniel Day-Lewis has justifiably acquired a reputation as the most eccentrically chameleonic actors out there. However, this past summer, the 60-year-old actor and three-time Best Lead Actor Oscar winner announced his most shocking role to date: retiree. Consequently, the upcoming historical drama, Phantom Thread will purportedly stand as Day-Lewis’s final film role.

If the pledge holds, he’s going out with a bang, reunited with director Paul Thomas Anderson for an introspective character study.

The Phantom Thread trailer showcases what (for now,) stands as Daniel Day-Lewis’s last onscreen role before he takes a proverbial curtain call from the movie industry. Here, he delves into 1950s London, playing Reynolds Woodcock, a fashion designer and dressmaker for Britain’s high society types, be it royalty, celebrities, heiresses and the generally wealthy. While
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film News Roundup: Russo Brothers Partner With Slamdance for Fellowship (Exclusive)

Film News Roundup: Russo Brothers Partner With Slamdance for Fellowship (Exclusive)
In today’s film news roundup, the Russo brothers are launching a Slamdance fellowship, Magnolia buys “The China Hustle,” and Bryan Singer is producing and possibly directing “The Anomaly.”

Slamdance Fellowship

The directing team of Anthony and Joe Russo are launching the Russo Brothers Fellowship, to be presented to a Slamdance filmmaker at January’s Slamdance Film Festival.

The brothers will select one filmmaker, who will receive a $25,000 prize consisting of filmmaker support, an office at their new Los Angeles-based studio, mentoring from the duo, and a cash stipend for one year. The Russos’ new studio is in the downtown art district and has been developed with the goal of empowering and cultivating filmmakers.

“We’re very proud to partner with Slamdance,” said Anthony and Joe Russo. “Having begun our careers at this festival, we’re honored to partner with such a great organization, and to foster and support young filmmakers while creating a platform for new
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Tom Cruise’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey

Tom Cruise’s Best Performances — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

Last weekend saw the release of the latest Tom Cruise vehicle, “American Made,” and critics are raving that it’s better than “The Mummy!” In honor of this great achievement, we ask: What is Tom Cruise’s greatest performance?

Read More:‘American Made’ Review: Tom Cruise Finally Lands a Role Worthy of His Talents E. Oliver Whitney (@cinemabite), ScreenCrush.com

The greatest Tom Cruise performance of all time happened on Oprah’s couch in 2005. But in the movies? “Magnolia.” It’s the best, but it’s also the “most” Cruise performance. His batshit insanity just barely holds together the fragile insecurity of the man beneath the horndog motivation speaker.
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Tom Cruise Should Make the Migration to Television — Very Good TV Podcast

Why Tom Cruise Should Make the Migration to Television — Very Good TV Podcast
Remember the time when an actor was perceived to be taking a fall when moving from the big screen to the small screen? Well, thankfully, those times are gone and we can see A-listers grace all screens without judgement. Just look at the gang from “Big Little Lies” or Dwayne Johnson in “Ballers.” And yet there are still some actors that have not (yet) dipped their toes in television and the crucial question is: Should they even try?

Read More:i’ve Seen the Future of Tom Cruise, and It’s Not the Movies

Tom Cruise — whose most recent film, “American Made,” just debuted in the No. 2 spot during a particularly slow box office weekend — is the actor in question for this week’s Very Good TV Podcast. IndieWire’s TV Editor Liz Shannon Miller and TV Critic Ben Travers weigh in on the pros and cons of Tom Cruise trying out television.
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Tom Cruise Should Make the Migration to Television — Very Good TV Podcast

Why Tom Cruise Should Make the Migration to Television — Very Good TV Podcast
Remember the time when an actor was perceived to be taking a fall when moving from the big screen to the small screen? Well, thankfully, those times are gone and we can see A-listers grace all screens without judgement. Just look at the gang from “Big Little Lies” or Dwayne Johnson in “Ballers.” And yet there are still some actors that have not (yet) dipped their toes in television and the crucial question is: Should they even try?

Read More:i’ve Seen the Future of Tom Cruise, and It’s Not the Movies

Tom Cruise — whose most recent film, “American Made,” just debuted in the No. 2 spot during a particularly slow box office weekend — is the actor in question for this week’s Very Good TV Podcast. IndieWire’s TV Editor Liz Shannon Miller and TV Critic Ben Travers weigh in on the pros and cons of Tom Cruise trying out television.
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Weekend #1 Up for Grabs after Record September at the Box Office Comes to an End

Weekend #1 Up for Grabs after Record September at the Box Office Comes to an End
As a record September comes to an end, it's a race for number one with three films separated by a mere $310k. Based on estimates, it's a return to #1 for WB and New Line's It, but hot on its heels is Universal's American Made along with Fox's Kingsman: The Golden Circle. Otherwise, Sony's Flatliners debuted on life support, Novus's Til Death Do Us Part found its way into the top ten and Pure Flix's A Question of Faith finished on the outside looking in. With just over $300k separating number one and number three on this weekend's box office chart, first place currently belongs to WB and New Line's It, which is back on top after last weekend saw the killer clown finish in the runner up position. With an estimated $17.3 million, the record-breaking horror has now topped $291 million domestically and will spend Sunday enjoying its third weekend out of
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

‘American Made’ Review: Tom Cruise Grins His Way Through a Dark Comedy

As fun and as sharp as American Made can be, it’s also a bit depressing since you can’t help but feel like this was the opportunity for star Tom Cruise to return to the more nuanced performances he hasn’t shown us in over a decade. Cruise is a good actor, but it seemed like he made a decision in the late 2000s to only play likable characters, thus leaving behind more interesting roles like the ones he played in Magnolia, War of the Worlds, and Eyes Wide Shut. This renders Doug Liman’s movie a bit of …
See full article at Collider.com »

Tom Cruise’s ‘American Made’ Battles ‘Kingsman 2,’ ‘It’ at Weekend Box Office

Tom Cruise’s ‘American Made’ Battles ‘Kingsman 2,’ ‘It’ at Weekend Box Office
Tom Cruise has arrived to cap a record September at the box office. But it won’t end with a bang.

He’s starring in this weekend’s widest launch, Universal’s “American Made,” which is expected to land in the low to mid-teens at 3,023 locations. While that’s certainly not ideal for an action feature with a major movie star attached, the film’s finances are partially bolstered by having already earned more than $60 million overseas. Still, there’s a good chance that it will be overshadowed by the recent string of R-rated releases including “It” and “Kingsman: The Golden Circle.”
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Will Tom Cruise's American Made Fly High at the Box Office?

  • MovieWeb
Will Tom Cruise's American Made Fly High at the Box Office?
After New Line Cinema's It remake shook the box office out of its horrendous summer slump, it seems those glory days may be already over, with what looks to be a rather weak showing in theaters this weekend. Universal's American Made, Sony's Flatliners remake, PureFlix's A Question of Faith and Novus' Til Death Do Us Part will all be vying for the box office crown, along with an expanding Battle of the Sexes. But it seems like, despite a strong critical showing from American Made, Kingsman 2 will likely repeat atop the box office with a lukewarm $19.7 million, followed by American Made with $16.4 million.

Box Office Mojo reports that American Made will debut in roughly 3,000 theaters, while the Flatliners remake will only arrive in 2,200 theaters, although no theater count estimates were given for Til Death Do Us Part or A Question of Faith. Fox Searchlight's Battle Of the Sexes,
See full article at MovieWeb »
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