Deric Longden and his wife, Aileen, come to terms with the fact that his mother, Annie, is getting too old to live on her own. Annie suffers her first stroke and a nursing home is the ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(book), (screenplay)
Reviews
4 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Annie Longden (as Dame Thora Hird)
...
...
Jennifer Luckraft ...
Nurse one
David Shimwell ...
Young man
...
Gloria Brooks
...
Fred Brooks
Eddie Caswell ...
Widower
Tom Higgins ...
Doctor
Diana Flacks ...
Mrs Corey
...
Chemist
...
Mrs. Nellie Elliot
Dinah Handley ...
Do-gooder
Katherine Dow Blyton ...
Hospital Sister
...
Speech Therapist
Edit

Storyline

Deric Longden and his wife, Aileen, come to terms with the fact that his mother, Annie, is getting too old to live on her own. Annie suffers her first stroke and a nursing home is the obvious solution, but which one and where? Written by Mort Kingsley

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

31 October 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Elveszett szavak  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Jennifer Luckraft who plays a nurse, and Tom Higgins who play a doctor in this, played a nursing assistant and doctor respectively in Children's Ward (1989). See more »

Quotes

Annie Longden: Oh, Derek, I've left the key for you.
Deric Longden: Thanks Luv, Where abouts?
Annie Longden: I've stuck it in the lock so you can find it.
See more »

Connections

Follows Screen One: Wide-Eyed and Legless (1993) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Pure Pathos!
27 April 2005 | by (London, England.) – See all my reviews

This bittersweet exploration of what familial love is, and the pain there is for all concerned in losing someone to this most alienating of diseases (alzheimers) proves something exceptional in that it shows Dame Thora aware of her own frailty (physically and mentally) yet still able to put it all together for one last truly great performance.

It tells too of the various shades of reality of existence that really are what some mental illness (or deterioration) can be about.

And it's OK to laugh, because it shows the fragility of what we are all so sure of...our hold on the world and the way we see it. And that certainty is laughable.

Pete Postlethwaite - magic.


7 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?