5.3/10
10
2 user

Cup-Tie Honeymoon (1948)

Joe Butler, the soccer-playing son of the company chairman, has to decide which team he will play for in a championship match, his school's or his father's. He makes the right decision and ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(as Anthony Toner), (as Ronny Parsons)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Sandy Powell ...
Joe Butler
Dan Young ...
Cecil Alistair
Betty Jumel ...
Betty
Pat McGrath ...
Eric Chambers
...
Mary Chambers
Frank Groves ...
Jimmy Owen
Joyanne Bracewell ...
Pauline May
Vic Arnley ...
Grandad
Harold Walden ...
Himself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Barry K. Barnes ...
Grumpy Customer
David Callan ...
Policeman
David Carey ...
Clarence Bell
Bruce Carstairs ...
Henry Chambers
Mavis Compston ...
Lady Customer
Hilary Dean ...
Irene Butler
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Storyline

Joe Butler, the soccer-playing son of the company chairman, has to decide which team he will play for in a championship match, his school's or his father's. He makes the right decision and wins the affections of a pretty secretary in the process. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Comedy

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Details

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Release Date:

18 March 1948 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(Visatone Marconi)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Arthur Mertz passed away before filming started, having only written part of the story. The screenplay was completed by an uncredited Harry Jackson See more »

Soundtracks

Love Is Just A Game
Music by Fred Harris
Lyrics by Albert W. Stanbury
Sung by Sandy Powell and Betty Jumel
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User Reviews

 
A quirky slice of English cinematic regional comedy.
17 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

Felt the last review a little harsh. Admittedly, the flimsy plot seems little more than a vehicle to string a number of variety hall skits together, but some of these are funny, and Betty Jumel is a delightful comic actress. Stilted, naive, haphazard, badly directed and inadvertently charming, I would recommend this to anyone who, like myself, enjoys the amateurish charms of regional British cinema of the 1940s. There are worse ways of spending an hour and a half!


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