BBC Sunday-Night Theatre (1950–1959)
8.0/10
413
15 user 4 critic

Nineteen Eighty-Four 

George Orwell's novel of a totalitarian future society in which a man whose daily work is rewriting history tries to rebel by falling in love.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (adapted as a television play by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
O'Brien
...
Julia Dixon
...
Syme
...
Emmanuel Goldstein
Campbell Gray ...
Parsons
Hilda Fenemore ...
Mrs. Parsons
Pamela Grant ...
Parsons Girl
Keith Davis ...
Parsons Boy
Janet Barrow ...
Woman Supervisor
Norman Osborne ...
First Youth
Tony Lyons ...
Second Youth
Malcolm Knight ...
Third Youth
John Baker ...
First Man
Victor Platt ...
Second Man
Edit

Storyline

George Orwell's novel of a totalitarian future society in which a man whose daily work is rewriting history tries to rebel by falling in love.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 December 1954 (UK)  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

£3,249 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Following remarks by the Duke of Edinburgh that he and the Queen had "thoroughly enjoyed" the broadcast, the live repeat, four days later, attracted the largest television audience since the Coronation. See more »

Goofs

When Winston Smith returns to his workstation and puts his glasses on in the first minutes of the film, a microphone boom shadow is clearly visible, See more »

Quotes

Winston Smith: The rats had... Oh, God!
See more »

Connections

Version of Theatre 625: The World of George Orwell: 1984 (1965) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

If you've never seen this, the greatest filmed version....
7 April 2007 | by See all my reviews

.....feel free to contact wnstn_hmltn@yahoo.com for a copy. Teaming the ultimate speculative-fiction scenarist (Nigel Kneale) with two of the most monumental actors to have ever had a command of the Queen's English (Peter Cushing and Andre Morell) has resulted in a dynamic trio striking this unflinching rendition of the Orwell classic with sparks aplenty. Later to become living legends over at Hammer Films (particularly Cushing), it was this momentous pairing of Morell and Cushing that led the Hammer powers-that-be to reunite them seven years later in the truly remarkable "Cash on Demand" (see my review). The lovely, inscrutable Yvonne Mitchell acquits herself well as Cushing's forbidden love interest, and the atmosphere of foreboding and dread is so thick you could cut it. Last but not least, watching Kneale apply his inimitable touch to Orwell's concepts is a tremendously exciting foretaste of the wholly original yarns he would later spin ("Quatermass," etc. ) A superlative production all the way around.....don't miss it!


6 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 15 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now