George Orwell's novel of a totalitarian future society in which a man whose daily work is rewriting history tries to rebel by falling in love.

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(novel), (adapted as a television play by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Yvonne Mitchell ...
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Arnold Diamond ...
Campbell Gray ...
Hilda Fenemore ...
Pamela Grant ...
Keith Davis ...
Janet Barrow ...
Woman Supervisor
Norman Osborne ...
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Tony Lyons ...
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Malcolm Knight ...
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John Baker ...
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Victor Platt ...
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George Orwell's novel of a totalitarian future society in which a man whose daily work is rewriting history tries to rebel by falling in love.

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Drama

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Release Date:

12 December 1954 (UK)  »

Box Office

Budget:

£3,249 (estimated)
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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Following remarks by the Duke of Edinburgh that he and the Queen had "thoroughly enjoyed" the broadcast, the live repeat, four days later, attracted the largest television audience since the Coronation. See more »

Goofs

When Winston Smith presses the door shut after departing Parsons, the entire set wall wobbles. See more »

Quotes

Winston Smith: The rats had... Oh, God!
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Connections

Referenced in The 100 Greatest Scary Moments (2003) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A lot better than I'd expected it would be.
6 August 2012 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

This is the fourth and probably the best version of "1984" that I have seen. There's a decent version with Edmund O'Brien that is hard to find, one made for TV ("Studio One") and the more recent version with Richard Harris and John Hurt but for me, this made for TV British version is best for three main reasons. First, Peter Cushing was a dandy actor and did a fine job. Second, the book was set in London and the British accents made it work better than the American versions. Third, despite the very, very small budget, the cheap sets worked just fine--as they were able to provide an appropriate level of greyness for the story. A bigger budget really couldn't have helped in this way. Overall, it's well worth seeing and is available for free download at archive.org--a website frequently linked to IMDb.


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