MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 224,817 this week

The Trespasser (1981)

TV Movie  -   -  30 August 1981 (Sweden)
7.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.3/10 from 9 users  
Reviews: 2 user

Add a Plot

Director:

Writers:

(novel),
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 1016 titles
created 9 months ago
 

Related Items

Search for "The Trespasser" on Amazon.com

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Trespasser (TV Movie 1981)

The Trespasser (TV Movie 1981) on IMDb 7.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Trespasser.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Margaret Whiting ...
Beatrice
Leilah Flanagan ...
Gwen
Daniel Chasin ...
Frank
Betty Hardy ...
Mrs. Curtis
Alan Penn ...
Michael
Willy Bowman ...
German (as Willie Bowman)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Siegmund
Catherine Hall ...
Vera
...
Helena
Dinah Stabb ...
Louisa
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on novel

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 August 1981 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

Auf verbotenen Wegen  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
DEFERENTIAL FILMING OF EARLY LAWRENCE.
21 December 2003 | by (Mountain Mesa, California) – See all my reviews



The unity within the second novel of D. H. Lawrence that embraces character development, location, symbolism, and incident is preserved in this potent rendering, well-directed by Colin Gregg from a visually accented script penned by Hugh Stoddart, filmed largely on the Isle of Wight, setting of the heart of the novel and an important constituent toward an understanding of the escape from reality that shadows tortured lovers Helena Verden (Pauline Moran) and Siegmund MacNair (Alan Bates). An influence of Nietzsche upon Lawrence as an artist is partly transposed for this film as a totemic element of light, and Gregg and Stoddart, which latter performs a commendable task by interfusing many of a lengthy work's most significant sections into a linear scenario, additionally focus upon the sea and the moon, twin motival subjects of the Wertherian original wherein the lovers become prisoners to romantic passion. Siegmund, an orchestral violinist, has tutored Helena for the past seven years, during which they have fallen in love, although a physical aspect has not been consummated, as Siegmund is married with three children and, notwithstanding his being unhappily so, has not that force of character requisite to alter his posture towards either his wife or lover, so that Helena eventually arranges for the pair to have a five-day idyll upon Wight, since she believes that Siegmund will decide in her favour after they are able to be constant companions. Contrast between an imaginary world of romance and poetically charged emotion is compared by the scenario with mundane actuality, and if Helena's inhibitions and Siegmund's depression are not overcome, their shared desire will remain unrequited, made palpable by the straightforward plot decorated with cogent voiceovers from Siegmund taken directly from the novel's text. No aspect of this English production is arrested by the efforts of any, with exceptional contributions from, in addition to those mentioned, Dinah Stabb as Helena's friend and musical accompanist Louisa; costumer Monica Howe, whose Edwardian garmenture only enhances the striking Pre-Raphaelite quality of Helena; and the sterling sound mixing of David Stephenson that sharply increases the artistic value of a film that should receive wider distribution.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Trespasser (1981) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?