Asa West is a wild sort of a fellow, and is driven from home by his father for disobedience. After a long time of absence, Asa secures a position on a farm, and soon gains the respect of ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Tefft Johnson ...
Mr. West - the Father
Mrs. B.F. Clinton ...
Mrs. West - the Mother
...
Asa West - the Prodigal Son
...
A Farmer
Edith Halleran ...
Mr. West's First Daughter
...
Mr. West's Second Daughter (as Miss Francis)
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Storyline

Asa West is a wild sort of a fellow, and is driven from home by his father for disobedience. After a long time of absence, Asa secures a position on a farm, and soon gains the respect of his employer. Mr. West takes his wife and daughters on a motoring trip through the country. Their machine breaks down, and while the chauffeur is repairing the car, Mr. and Mrs. West take a walk down the road, and the two daughters wander off in the opposite direction. Asa emerges from the woods he has been working in, and when walking home on the road, meets his sisters. They are very pleased to see him, and take him back to the car, where they meet their parents. When Mr. West's eyes meet the statue of his son, he at once embraces him and once more the family is united. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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29 September 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The story is clean, wise and good, tender and sympathetic
10 April 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is one of those rare and good pictures of which we could wish a larger supply. It is a picture that everyone can see, enjoy, and profit by. While classed as a drama it is also worthy of being classed among the "educationals" because of its many beneficial points, and other lessons, making it acceptable in either day or Sunday school. The story is a twofold one, it is seldom that two stories can be told with such a unity of purpose as we find blending so harmoniously here. In a well-to-do family there is a prodigal son, whose drinking propensities bring sorrow to the home. It is a sad sight to see a bright young man coming to the family table in a state of intoxication. Although the father seems harsh in his manner he cannot be blamed for ordering the young man from the room. Determining to leave home despite the pleadings of his mother and sisters, he packs his valise and goes out into the world. We next find him far away working on a farm, where all the indications are that he is using the strength of his young manhood in the development of both muscle and character. The farmer's pride is his flock of sheep; he sends them forth in the morning, counts them upon their return in the evening. On this particular evening one lamb is missing. At this time the father with his family are upon an automobile tour. Their machine comes to grief near this very farm; while the chauffeur is making the necessary repairs the occupants take a walk. The father meets the farmer and joins with him in the search for the missing lamb, which he is successful in finding, not, however, without serious reflections upon his own missing son. The daughters, having gone in another direction, meet their brother returning from the woods, where he has spent the day wood-chopping. With great joy they take him to their parents, who receive him gladly; the father especially welcoming him after the manner of the lost lamb he had so recently found. The young man himself now entirely reformed joyfully goes home with the family. Thus the farmer finds his sheep; the father finds his son and joy reigns. The story is clean, wise and good, tender and sympathetic, yet morally strong. It will be appreciated everywhere.

  • The Moving Picture World, September 16, 1911



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