John King and his wife, Dora, with their little girl, Ida, live plainly but contentedly upon his small salary. Little Ida has few playthings, her father not being able to purchase more, but... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Edit

Storyline

John King and his wife, Dora, with their little girl, Ida, live plainly but contentedly upon his small salary. Little Ida has few playthings, her father not being able to purchase more, but to her mind they are the finest ever seen, her favorite being a Teddy bear, with one bind leg missing. In order to make the animal as interesting as possible, her father makes a tiny crutch for it, which fills her childish heart with joy. One morning, as King is on his way to the office where he is employed, he sees a man suddenly taken ill and assists him to return to his residence. This man, William Daly, a wealthy old bachelor, is very grateful for the service, but sees no way of returning the favor at the time. In consequence of this delay, King is quite late to his work and his employer, an irascible old skinflint, gives him a terrific scolding and in spite of King's explanations, discharges him from his service. King returns home greatly cast down and not knowing which way to turn, he tries ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Release Date:

19 December 1910 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

The drama of a child doing childish things in an altogether childish way
11 October 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Discharged for assisting a man ill on the street, a father is reduced to the last extremity. Then his little daughter decides to pawn her Teddy bear, her dearest possession. The gentleman whom her father assisted sees and follows her and learns of the family's situation. Then comes a purchase of the bear and to conclude a Christmas tree at the bachelor's home, laden with all manner of delightful things, but best of all an envelope containing the appointment to a new position. there isn't much drama about it, except the drama of a child doing childish things in an altogether childish way. The heart interest is there and a suspicious moisture lurks around the eyes when the little one trudges away with her bear, her most valuable possession, to secure for her parents the necessaries of life which they cannot provide. - The Moving Picture World, December 31, 1910


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page