MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 46,693 this week

Un vivant qui passe (1999)

7.2
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.2/10 from 73 users  
Reviews: 1 user

An interview with a WWII Red Cross official who wrote a glowing report on a Jewish ghetto-cum-death camp.

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

Editors' Spotlight

IMDb Picks: October

IMDb's editors share the movies and TV shows they are excited to see in October.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 5427 titles
created 03 Dec 2011
 
a list of 337 titles
created 6 months ago
 
a list of 485 titles
created 2 weeks ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Un vivant qui passe (1999)

Un vivant qui passe (1999) on IMDb 7.2/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Un vivant qui passe.
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  
Director: Claude Lanzmann
Stars: Yehuda Lerner, Claude Lanzmann
Shoah (1985)
Documentary | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

Claude Lanzmann directed this 9 1/2 hour documentary of the Holocaust without using a single frame of archive footage. He interviews survivors, witnesses, and ex-Nazis (whom he had to film ... See full summary »

Director: Claude Lanzmann
Stars: Simon Srebnik, Michael Podchlebnik, Motke Zaidl
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A documentary about a pet cemetery in California, and the people who have pets buried there.

Director: Errol Morris
Stars: Lucille Billingsley, Zella Graham, Cal Harberts
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

An embittered law student commits a brutal double murder; a family man takes the fall and is forced into a harsh prison sentence; a mother and her two children wander the countryside looking for some kind of redemption.

Director: Lav Diaz
Stars: Sid Lucero, Angeli Bayani, Archie Alemania
Passenger (1963)
Drama | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The last film of Andrzej Munk, who died in a crash during the filming. A German woman on a ship coming back to Europe notices a face of another woman which brings recollections from the ... See full summary »

Directors: Andrzej Munk, Witold Lesiewicz
Stars: Aleksandra Slaska, Anna Ciepielewska, Janusz Bylczynski
Out 1 (1971)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

"Out 1" is a very precise picture of post May '68 malaise - when Utopian dreams of a new society had crashed and burned, radical terrorism was starting to emerge in unlikely places and a ... See full summary »

Directors: Jacques Rivette, Suzanne Schiffman
Stars: Michèle Moretti, Hermine Karagheuz, Karen Puig
Le rapport Karski (TV Movie 2010)
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  
Director: Claude Lanzmann
Stars: Jan Karski, Claude Lanzmann
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Maurice Rossel ...
Himself
...
Himself / Interviewer
Edit

Storyline

Claude Lanzmann interviews Maurice Rossel, a Swiss official of the International Red Cross during World War II, who wrote a favorable report of Theresienstadt, a "model" Jewish ghetto that was in reality a death camp. Written by J. Spurlin

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

23 September 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Visitor from the Living  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Edited into Prisoner of Paradise (2002) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
A bracing 65-minute interview with a Red Cross official who toured a death camp ... and found it favorable.
21 May 2000 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Claude Lanzmann filmed this interview in 1979 to be part of his Holocaust documentary, "Shoah" (1985), but couldn't fit it into the overall structure of the film. Nearly two decades later, this interview became its own documentary, a sixty-five-minute postscript to the massive "Shoah." It stands on its own.

Lanzmann interviews Maurice Rossel, a Swiss official of the International Red Cross during World War II. Rossel first talks about his unofficial visit to the Auschwitz camp where the skeletal prisoners looked on him as if he were a "visitor from the living." Then he describes his visit to Theresienstadt.

Theresienstadt was a farce, a death camp for Jews tricked up as a model ghetto. Rossel's job was to inspect the camp and issue a report on what he found. He found it largely favorable.

Rossel comments on how unpleasantly he was struck by the obvious VIP status of the Jewish prisoners, then how unstomachably servile and docile they seemed. He says that despite ample opportunity no one slipped him a note, whispered a message, or did anything to indicate the ghetto was a sham.

After coaxing Rossel's side of the story, Lanzmann gives his own. According to his research, Rossel's visit was carefully planned. The prisoners were rehearsed for months on how to behave and what to say. Prisoners were forbidden to salute a Nazi during the one-day visit, an otherwise mandatory obeisance. A bandstand and a children's playground were erected immediately before the visit and torn down immediately afterward.

Lanzmann tells Rossel how his report conflicted with the facts. Rossel reported the prisoners were properly fed when in fact they were starving. He estimated the number of deaths as dozens per day (as if that weren't enough) when in fact it was thousands. His only criticism was the overcrowding. He didn't know the half of it: five-thousand prisoners were removed to Auschwitz and executed shortly before his arrival.

A discussion period followed the screening I attended, and one man said he found Lanzmann to be insufferably smug. The Nazis, he said, were good at fooling people; surely they would have conned Lanzmann himself had he been the one to tour Theresienstadt. Another man reminded him of a key moment in the interview: Lanzmann asks Rossel if, knowing everything he does now, he would have written the same report. Rossel says yes, he would have.

He was willfully blind during the tour and remained so decades later.

Little can be said for this documentary as a film. We see a talking head occasionally interspersed with traveling shots of Theresienstadt as it looked decades after the war. This is just an unadorned look at the machinery of evil – as represented by one cog.


11 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Un vivant qui passe (1999) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?