Dick Carlysle returns home to find that his mother has married Brute Kettle who is really out to get the Carlysle ranch. First Kettle gets Bennett to forge a letter saying Dick relinquishes... See full summary »

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Edna Aslin ...
J.P. McGowan ...
Grace Stevens ...
Bud Osborne ...
Alfred Hewston ...
Perry Murdock ...
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Dick Carlysle returns home to find that his mother has married Brute Kettle who is really out to get the Carlysle ranch. First Kettle gets Bennett to forge a letter saying Dick relinquishes his inheritance in the ranch and then he tries to get Dick's mother to relinquish hers. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

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property rights | See All (1) »

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Western

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21 December 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Ferro e Fogo  »

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1.33 : 1
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One for Bob Steele's many fans -- including me!
29 August 2015 | by See all my reviews

Produced, directed and starring (as the villain) J.P. McGowan, this is a minor, small budget but interesting little western that gives us a chance to see Bob Steele in what must be around his 32nd movie and the second last of his silents. Already, Steele has got his screen persona down pat and is more than a match for director J.P. McGowan who plays the villain with his usual gusto. It was also good to see diminutive cutie, Edna Aslin, in the fourth of her eleven movie appearances. She retired from films in 1935 and nobody seems to know where she went. Presumably, she got married. And this was the final film of Grace Stevens, who actually retired from movies back in 1919. Here she plays our hero's mother. She seems a bit old to have a son as young as Bob Steele. But I'm not complaining. Oddly, McGowan's direction anticipates the style of a TV movie by using lots of close-ups – and not just of the stars, but of the minor characters as well.


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