MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 1,981 this week

Late August, Early September (1998)
"Fin août, début septembre" (original title)

7.0
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.0/10 from 1,087 users  
Reviews: 15 user | 22 critic

A story about the transition from late youth to early maturity, the film follows several friends and lovers as they come to make decisions on how to live their lives--getting a job more in ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

7.0
a list of 391 titles
created 29 Aug 2012
 
a list of 197 titles
created 05 Nov 2012
 
a list of 109 titles
created 10 Aug 2013
 
a list of 30 titles
created 7 months ago
 
a list of 187 titles
created 6 months ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Late August, Early September (1998)

Late August, Early September (1998) on IMDb 7/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Late August, Early September.
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

A Single Girl (1995)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Early one morning Valerie has to tell her unemployed boyfriend Remi that she is pregnant. She has decided to keep the child, but they argue whether they should break up or not. That same ... See full summary »

Director: Benoît Jacquot
Stars: Virginie Ledoyen, Benoît Magimel, Dominique Valadié
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

When Gabriel and Emilie meet by chance, he offers her a ride, and they spend the evening talking, laughing and getting along famously. At the end of the night, Emilie declines Gabriel's ... See full summary »

Director: Emmanuel Mouret
Stars: Julie Gayet, Michaël Cohen, Virginie Ledoyen
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  
Director: Jean-François Richet
Stars: Virginie Ledoyen, Yazid Aït, Mar Sodupe
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

At the age of 20, Martin leaves his home town and comes to Paris, where he fortunately becomes a model by chance. He meets Alice, his brother's friend, and falls in love with her. They ... See full summary »

Director: André Téchiné
Stars: Juliette Binoche, Alexis Loret, Mathieu Amalric
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

Seventeen-year-old Beth is just finishing school, and lives in Paris with her bedridden mother and younger brother. She is annoyed because her boyfriend suggested she try sleeping with ... See full summary »

Director: Benoît Jacquot
Stars: Judith Godrèche, Marcel Bozonnet, Ivan Desny
Marianne (1997)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.8/10 X  
Director: Benoît Jacquot
Stars: Virginie Ledoyen, Marcel Bozonnet, Julie Gayet
Les marmottes (1993)
Comedy | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.1/10 X  
Director: Élie Chouraqui
Stars: Jean-Hugues Anglade, Jacqueline Bisset, Christine Boisson
Drama | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Jeanne has an appetite for love that can never be satisfied. Lovers at every corner of her life she is still in search of that "one". When a impromptu tryst on the subway with Olivier gives... See full summary »

Directors: Olivier Ducastel, Jacques Martineau
Stars: Virginie Ledoyen, Mathieu Demy, Jacques Bonnaffé
Mima (1991)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  
Director: Philomène Esposito
Stars: Virginie Ledoyen, Nino Manfredi, Margarita Lozano
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.9/10 X  

The joyous last day of school before summer vacation turns sour for four fun-crazed troublemakers at Beaver High.

Director: Frédéric Jardin
Stars: Géraldine Pailhas, Bernard Verley, Edouard Baer
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  
Director: Christian de Chalonge
Stars: Marcello Mastroianni, Ángela Molina, Michel Piccoli
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  
Director: Jean-Pierre Mocky
Stars: Jean-Pierre Mocky, Jean Abeillé, Patricia Barzyk
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Gabriel
...
Anne
...
Adrien
...
Jenny
Alex Descas ...
Jérémie
...
Lucie
Mia Hansen-Løve ...
Véra
Nathalie Richard ...
Maryelle
...
Thomas
Olivier Cruveiller ...
Axel
Jean-Baptiste Malartre ...
Editeur
André Marcon ...
Hattou
Elisabeth Mazev ...
Visiteuse de l'appartement
Olivier Py ...
Visiteur de l'appartement
Jean-Baptiste Montagut ...
Joseph Costa
Edit

Storyline

A story about the transition from late youth to early maturity, the film follows several friends and lovers as they come to make decisions on how to live their lives--getting a job more in harmony with ones ideals, committing to a lover, giving up a lover that no longer loves you: a film about grown-ups growing up. Written by Josh Baudhuin <jambo@well.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

lover | love | friend | writer | watching tv | See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 February 1999 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Late August, Early September  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$20,432 (USA) (16 July 1999)

Gross:

$36,662 (USA) (13 August 1999)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

, ,  »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Hawa Dolo
Written by Ali Farka Touré
Performed by Ali Farka Touré
© World Circuit Music. Courtesy of World Cirtuit Ltd
extrait de l'album "The Source"
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Disappointing in that it's not the greatest film in the world, but still miles above everybody else.
26 August 1999 | by (Dublin, Ireland) – See all my reviews

In many ways, FIN AOUT, DEBUT DECEMBRE is a dismaying and disappointing experience. Assayas' IRMA VEP is the best French film of the last quarter century; thematically rich, stylistically remarkable, emotionally devastating. FIN AOUT is, in comparison, a rather drab handheld take on Eric Rohmer, filled with dull, aimless, middle-class intellectuals who have such 'financial problems' that they get their uncle to lend them his country villa; they whinge and emote in the most banal terms, in a plot that says nothing, and goes nowhere.

This very drabness seems to be the film's theme. Although the title is very specific about time and the seasons, the film itself seems to exist in a timeless vacuum. Each episode has a temporal subtitle (e.g. 'six months later'), but no month is ever specified, and could therefore be any or none. This is not the film's failing, but that of the characters, who are locked in their own solipsism, flailing desperately, but unable to escape.

Gabriel says of Adrien, the writer, that he was minor because he could only see the world from his limited viewpoint, but this is a much more general malaise - all the talk about friendship can't hide the fact that each character is fatally limited in perception of others, because of obsession with self (figured in the cramped interiors. The trips to the country are literally bursts of fresh air). This doesn't mean that Assayas isn't generous with his characters; he is probably kinder than some of them deserve (Gabriel in particular needs a good shaking). The search for an apartment, therefore, is not a trite subject - these rootless characters, forming their own community, are so desperate for a sense of place, home, that they search everywhere for it: the country, abroad, the past, death.

FIN AOUT has in common with IRMA VEP a concern with the crisis of expression in this era of post-modernism. The crucial figure here is the writer, significantly a receptacle of death (the funeral is becoming a recurring motif in modern French cinema, as in THOSE WHO LOVE ME TAKE THE TRAIN); focus for all the other characters.

The question is: in an age of pastiche and reproduction, is it possible to insist on authentic personal expression (the film's structure focuses on shifting series of pairs: uneasy doublings and reproductions). And does it matter that this person (both the director in IRMA VEP, and the writer here) is rather objectionable as a human being? Is the insistence on the personal elitist and restrictive?

In IRMA VEP, these questions were urgently juggled up to the end, with no clear answers. Here, the writer is unrecognised until he dies, perhaps confirming our decadent reliance on the past, and our inability to come to terms with and express the present (although even this is undermined; as his publisher remarks on his perceived success, 'I wouldn't go that far').

Unlike the director in IRMA VEP, we get no example of Adrien's work, save a self-serving and cliched letter (significantly breaking up a relationship of the May/December type that has nearly killed French cinema). There is no transcendental moment, like the final sequence of IRMA VEP; in essence an archetypal post-modern artefact - a fragmentary, abandoned, incomplete, distorted, scratchy, uncontextualised piece of film; a haunting palimpsest from another age (a call to return to the beginnings of cinema, when possibilities were endless, before ossifying into the codes we are stuck with now?), it is also the locus for Assayas' faith in cinema, personal expression and emotion. This issue is left rather vague here, because we have no evidence with which to judge.

Well, except this film, of course. It is this that raises the film - Assayas' complete, mature mastery of the medium. Although his material is banal, he electrifies and enlivens it with his style: the fluidity of his camera movements and editing; his emotional use of colour, light and space; his mastery of the techniques of melodrama; his intimate ability to capture, and make profound, every seemingly trivial, gesture; his enlarging every detail to convey and enrich meaning.

Chris Darke has called FIN AOUT a cubist film, but it seems to me more like an obsessive Monet serial: the characters and place, for all their narrative perambulations, never seem to change, or resolve the problems that opened the film (even if they leave somewhere, it's back to somewhere they've been before), but Assayas' impressionistic eye, in capturing authentically the moment, asserts the beauty and depth of the transitory.

In fact, the film's nearest comparisons, for all its cinematic brilliance, might be literary - especially Proust and Beckett - in its avoidance of the dramatic (the main death occurs off-screen) in favour of the phatic, the continuous and the elliptical, giving a truer account of lives dominated by lack (the film's opening credits have the actors' names split apart, figuring the personality crises that make up its content).

I have been using a lot of superlatives, and here's another. Assayas is, along with Tim Burton, Takeshi Kitano and Wong Kar-Wai, the greatest director in the world: he has often been compared to the latter, although he can't quite reach Wong's offhand melancholy poetry just yet. FIN AOUT, than, is his HAPPY TOGETHER, an absolutely astonishing example of cinematic authority wasted on a rather monotonous psychodrama.


6 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
I like it a lot, what about you? jfca283
Discuss Late August, Early September (1998) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?