The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2016


Queensland writer Megan Doneman wins attachment to NCIS: La writers room

4 July 2016 11:27 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Megan Doneman (r) with the subject of her 2008 documentary, Kiran Bedi (l).

Queensland writer/producer Megan Doneman has been awarded the inaugural Greg Coote Scholarship, established by Screen Queensland and Australians in Film.

The scholarship, launched in 2014 and worth $30,000, will see Doneman mentored by executive producer Shane Brennan, creator of CBS's.NCIS: Los Angeles, in the show's La writers room.

Doneman started her career as an assistant editor on films such as Dark City, Babe: Pig in the City and The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.

She also wrote, directed and produced the 2008 documentary Kiran Bedi: Yes Madam, Sir, which was narrated by Helen Mirren and premiered at Tiff in 2010.

"Megan is an outstanding talent, who combines powerful storytelling with a determined work ethic," Screen Queensland Chair Linda Apelt said. "The opportunity to learn from the best of the best in the United States - at the »

- Staff Writer

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Destroy All Monsters: Warcraft Sucks, But Fantasy Doesn't

22 June 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Recipient of the Matt Brown "Monumental Drop" Award for most deserving second-weekend plunge, Duncan Jones' Warcraft already looks like an afterthought. Rightly so: Warcraft's terrible. Absolutely terrible. It makes Krull look like Dragonslayer. Makes Dragonslayer look like Willow. Makes Willow look like The Hobbit. Makes The Hobbit look like The Lord of the Rings. I mention Warcraft's lineage in the post-Star Wars fantasy blockbuster world only to point out that it's part of a cycle - one with varying degrees of silliness. But even having mentioned Star Wars, the real sea change came - of course - with The Fellowship of the Ring in 2001. That was the quantum leap the genre had spent decades waiting for (The Two Towers, and Gollum, would come the...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]

»

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Review: Why can't we just smile and enjoy the 'Raiders' remake documentary?

21 June 2016 4:20 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

There are times where I don't want to write about a film because I know for a fact that publishing my review is going to end up making people I like angry at me, and this is one of those times. But even months after seeing it, I find myself struggling to make sense out of the film Raiders! The Story Of The Greatest Fan Film Ever Made and the enthusiasm people have for it. I think the film is revealing, certainly, but I wouldn't say I enjoyed it. I also wouldn't call it a celebration of anything. Whether they realize it or not, Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen have given us one of the most searing, ugly portraits of artistic hubris since Overnight. I spent a good portion of my screening at the Drafthouse feeling sick to my stomach, tied in knots by what I was watching instead of elated or moved, »

- Drew McWeeny

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Can fantasy films escape Lord Of The Rings' shadow?

21 June 2016 4:18 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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The world of J.R.R. Tolkien, brought to the screen by Peter Jackson, continues to cast a shadow over fantasy cinema...

One realm to rule them all. One realm to find them, one realm to bring them all and in the darkness bind them, in the land of Middle-earth where the shadows lie.

Now, far be it from me to ever describe Middle-earth as a dark shadow over anything, but for everyone else trying to make a mega-hit fantasy film, the very thought of competing with Peter Jackson’s adaptations of The Lord Of The Rings and The Hobbit must seem the equivalent of toppling literal evil on Earth.

It seems that any time a big-budget fantasy flick is released, they get sneered at as generic, lacking the richness of detail or story compared to Lord Of The Rings.

But if this sounds like I’m suggesting there »

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Lord of the Rings

28 March 2016 12:16 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

We’re talking remakes again, and this time we’re dissecting not one but two popular films which were done previously as a single movie. This week, Cinelinx looks at Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings: Fellowship of the Ring and Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.

Ever since J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic book trilogy first came out in the 50s’ there had been talk of adapting it into film but the epic scope of the story often deterred filmmakers of the era from taking on the task. In the early 70’s, director John Boorman (Deliverance, Excalibur) wanted to do a condensed 100-minute version of the whole trilogy but that plan fell apart.

Then, animator/producer Ralph Bakshi (American Pop, Cool World) unveiled his idea to do a two-part adaptation of the trilogy in animated form. Since Tolkien’s daughter was a huge fan of Bakshi’s previous »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: Alice in Wonderland

21 March 2016 7:27 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

It’s time to talk remakes and we’re delving into Disney again with their two versions of one of the most famous children’s stories ever. With a sequel coming out this May, it’s a good time to dissect the previous cinematic adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (2010).

When Lewis Carroll wrote Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865, he created the best-ever example of the ‘Literary Nonsense’ genre. It’s become an enduring classic for 150 years. It’s been adapted many times. The most famous version is the 1951 animated classic Alice in Wonderland by Disney Studios. It’s one of Disney’s most visually interesting films, because the storyline is so artfully illogical and filled with characters who were meant to be animated. It utilizes some great voice actors, perfectly suited for their roles.

It’s not necessary to explain such a familiar story. We all know the Mad Hatter, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Beowulf: Return To The Shieldlands episode 11 review

14 March 2016 1:32 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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In an act of circularity, Beowulf: Return To The Shieldlands draws inspiration from the Beowulf-inspired The Lord Of The Rings...

This review contains spoilers.

This episode of Beowulf: Return To The Shieldlands desperately wants to be The Lord Of The Rings. All episodes of Beowulf: Return To The Shieldlands desperately want to be The Lord Of The Rings, of course, but in this one it is particularly obvious. In the brief pre-credits sequence, it has to be said, the ambition is really quite effective. The scene is short, sharp and to the point, and the looming shot of the militarily significant bridge that’s designed to remind us of the Argonath is suitably impressive.

Things start to fall apart a bit as we get to the episode proper, though. A sequence depicting Abrecan being armed for the fight, which looks almost exactly like the sequence depicting Theoden »

- louisamellor

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The Big Difference Between 'Batman v Superman' and 'Justice League'?

11 March 2016 3:35 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Ever since Warner Bros. announced its mammoth Dceu slate, there has been a running, unconfirmed rumor that the studio has a 'no jokes' policy when it comes to these upcoming DC Comics superhero movies. And by all accounts, nothing from the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice trailers or sneak peek footage indicates that this dark adventure has much time for one-liners. That might all change with Justice League Part 1.

That doesn't mean Justice League Part 1 is going to be some sort of laugh riot. But writer Chris Terrio has confirmed that there will be one big difference between this month's blockbuster Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and the movie it helps set up, 2017's Justice League Part 1. The later will definitely have a much lighter tone. Speaking with WSJ, the screenwriter had this to say.

"I expect Justice League will be tonally not quite as dark as Batman v Superman. »

- MovieWeb

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One Key Way Justice League Will Be Different From Batman V Superman

11 March 2016 3:25 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

The DC Extended Universe has only just gotten started, but a course has already been plotted for where the franchise will take its biggest heroes. After the events of Man of Steel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice not only explores the aftermath of Superman’s debut and Batman’s distrust towards the Kryptonian, but also introduces the main members of the Justice League (minus Green Lantern). These movies subsequently form an unofficial “trilogy” with 2017’s Justice League: Part One, but the first official team-up adventure with these heroes will adopt a different tone from its predecessor.  Having described Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice as being similar Empire Strikes Back or The Two Towers, writer Chris Terrio told The Wall Street Journal that he doesn’t expect Justice League: Part One to quite as dark the previous entry in this “ »

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Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

19 February 2016 3:34 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

 

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Watch Your Favorite Movies End The Second Someone Says The Title

9 February 2016 12:07 PM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Whenever you hear a film.s title mentioned during its running time you can.t help but get a little chill. It.s almost as if the film itself is winking at you with acknowledgement. But, what would happen if, when their titles were uttered, the films immediately came to an end? Well, one nifty YouTube editor has created not just one but two videos that end around a dozen films the moment that someone says the title. And it.s a damn good watch. Want to see more? Of course you do. Well Chris Huebs has also worked his magic on the likes of Forrest Gump, Fight Club, Gone Baby Gone, Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers, Full Metal Jacket, The Departed, and, rather tremendously, Back To The Future, too. Click on the video below to enjoy a sequel that really does match-up to and even surpasses its »

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The 100 Best Films of the 21st Century (So Far) - Part 4: #25-1

26 January 2016 11:17 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Our countdown of the top 100 films of the 21st Century (so far) concludes here with the top 25.

Click here for Part 1! (#100-76)

Click here for Part 2! (#75-51)

Click here for Part 3! (#50-26)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century has brought a lot of changes to the landscape of film. The advancement and sophistication of computers has made realistic computer generated effects a mainstay in both big-budget and small-budget films. The internet and streaming technologies have given big Hollywood new competition in films produced independently and by non-traditional means. We went from purchasing films on yards of tape to plastic disks, and now we can simply upload them to the cloud. Advertisements for films have reached a higher, more ruthless level where generating hype through trailers and teasers is crucial for a film’s commercial success. Movie attendance has fluctuated along with the economy, but that hasn »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

12 items from 2016


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