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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 40 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


I, Madman Blu-ray Clips & Trailer

20 July 2015 9:51 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Scream Factory continues their Summer of Fear Part 2 tomorrow with the Blu-ray debut of Tibor Takács' (The Gate) I, Madman, and we have clips and a trailer from the impending release.

I, Madman synopsis: "Gothic nightmares collide with gritty realism in this "stylish horror thriller [that] pulls you in and makes you pay attention" (Los Angeles Times)! After a spine-tingling paperback catches the imagination of bookstore clerk Virginia, she seeks out the author's second book, I, Madman. But once she opens the cover, its eerie tale of obsessive love comes to life, catapulting a disfigured, scalpel-wielding killer from the world of fiction onto the streets of Hollywood with one demented goal: to win Virginia's love, one murder at a time!

Starring Jenny Wright (Near Dark, The Lawnmower Man), Clayton Rohner (April Fool's Day, The Human Centipede III) and three-time Academy Award® winner* Randall William Cook (Best Visual Effects, The Lord Of The Rings »

- Derek Anderson

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Contest: Win I, Madman on Blu-ray

17 July 2015 1:24 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

After bringing demons onscreen in The Gate, Tibor Takács directed I, Madman, featuring a killer straight out of a horror novel. Scream Factory's releasing their I, Madman Blu-ray on July 21st, and we've been provided with three copies to give away.

I, Madman synopsis: "Gothic nightmares collide with gritty realism in this "stylish horror thriller [that] pulls you in and makes you pay attention" (Los Angeles Times)! After a spine-tingling paperback catches the imagination of bookstore clerk Virginia, she seeks out the author's second book, I, Madman. But once she opens the cover, its eerie tale of obsessive love comes to life, catapulting a disfigured, scalpel-wielding killer from the world of fiction onto the streets of Hollywood with one demented goal: to win Virginia's love, one murder at a time!

Starring Jenny Wright (Near Dark, The Lawnmower Man), Clayton Rohner (April Fool's Day, The Human Centipede III) and three-time Academy Award »

- Derek Anderson

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Oscar-Nominated Film Series: First 'Pirates of the Caribbean' One of Most Enjoyable Summer Blockbusters of Early 21st Century

29 June 2015 4:13 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl': Johnny Depp as Capt. Jack Sparrow. 'Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl' review: Mostly an enjoyable romp (Oscar Movie Series) Pirate movies were a Hollywood staple for about three decades, from the mid-'20s (The Sea Hawk, The Black Pirate) to the mid-to-late '50s (Moonfleet, The Buccaneer), when the genre, by then mostly relegated to B films, began to die down. Sporadic resurrections in the '80s and '90s turned out to be critical and commercial bombs (Pirates, Cutthroat Island), something that didn't bode well for the Walt Disney Company's $140 million-budgeted film "adaptation" of one of their theme-park rides. But Neptune's mood has apparently improved with the arrival of the new century. He smiled – grinned would be a more appropriate word – on the Gore Verbinski-directed Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, »

- Andre Soares

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‘Game of Thrones’ Still Too Medieval for Emmys?

16 June 2015 10:10 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

As fans still absorb the various body blows delivered by Sunday’s season finale, some are no doubt wondering whether “Game of Thrones” – a four-time Emmy best-drama nominee – can break its drought in terms of actually winning? If history is any guide, it’s an uphill battle.

The imposing wall the HBO drama has to scale can be traced to a variety of factors and historical precedents. The most obvious – one that’s griped about with annual reliability – is a perceived bias against so-called genre shows, those set in the worlds of science fiction, fantasy or (in the case of “The Walking Dead”) horror. Throughout its history, the Emmys have nominated relatively few programs representing that area, and honored one: ABC’s “Lost” a decade ago.

What has changed, in recent years, is the inordinate popularity of certain programs from those genres, reflecting their mass appeal – and not incidentally, their »

- Brian Lowry

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After Christopher Lee, Another Nonagenarian British Actor Has Died: Oscar Nominee Moody

12 June 2015 4:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in 'Oliver!' movie. Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' actor nominated for an Oscar dead at 91 (Note: This Ron Moody article is currently being revised.) Two well-regarded, nonagenarian British performers have died in the last few days: 93-year-old Christopher Lee (June 7, '15), best known for his many portrayals of Dracula and assorted movie villains and weirdos, from the title role in The Mummy to Dr. Catheter in Gremlins 2: The New Batch. 91-year-old Ron Moody (yesterday, June 11), among whose infrequent film appearances was the role of Fagin, the grotesque adult leader of a gang of boy petty thieves, in the 1968 Best Picture Academy Award-winning musical Oliver!, which also earned him a Best Actor nomination. Having been featured in nearly 200 movies and, most importantly, having had his mainstream appeal resurrected by way of the villainous Saruman in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit movies (and various associated merchandising, »

- Andre Soares

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Remembering Christopher Lee

12 June 2015 7:11 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We bid a fond farewell to the wonderful Christopher Lee, and salute some of his best roles...

Christopher Lee crammed a dozen lives into one. His Special Forces work in the Second World War remains shrouded in mystery. We do know that, in 1944, he climbed Vesuvius three days before it erupted. A fine, operatic singer, he famously released a heavy metal album in his later 80s. A skilled fencer, he performed all his own sword fights and has been killed on screen more than any actor in cinematic history. As a child Lee briefly encountered Prince Felix Yusupov, murderer of Rasputin, a part Lee would later of course play. Ian Fleming was a cousin, Muhammed Ali a friend and once dedicated a victory to Lee. Fluent in five languages, passable in another four, people like Lee don’t really exist anymore. In truth they probably never did.

One could write a lengthy, »

- simonbrew

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100 Essential Action Scenes: Battles & Combat

9 June 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

Whether storming a beach or a besieging castle, marching on foot or charging on horseback, in a historical epic or a fantasy extravaganza, battles scenes are some of the most complex and intricately choreographed of all action scenes. Capable of zooming in to a one-on-one fight between two foes or zooming out to show a big picture look at the action–and featuring anywhere from dozens to hundreds to thousands of extras, either flesh and blood or digital–these are the scenes in which wars are fought, tides are turned, and glory is won. »

- Shane Ramirez

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John Noble Joins ‘Elementary’ Season 4 as Series Regular

3 June 2015 1:28 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Fringe” and “Sleepy Hollow” alum John Noble will join “Elementary” season four as a series regular, CBS announced Wednesday.

Noble will play the wealthy, estranged father of Jonny Lee Miller’s Sherlock Holmes in the crime drama. The character has been referenced in past seasons as being instrumental in Sherlock’s first stint in rehab three years ago and in pairing his son with Joan Watson (Lucy Liu), his former sober companion-turned-investigative partner and friend. In the season-four premiere, airing this fall, Mr. Holmes arrives in New York City to deal with the aftermath of his son’s recent relapse.

“We could not be more delighted to have John Noble taking on such an important role,” said “Elementary” creator Robert Doherty. “We’ve enjoyed his work for many years now — especially his tremendous run on ‘Fringe’ — and cannot wait to see him opposite Jonny and Lucy. It’s going to be an exciting season. »

- Laura Prudom

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Avengers: Age of Ultron becomes the eighth-biggest film of all time

17 May 2015 9:37 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Having hit the $1 billion mark on Friday, Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron has now cracked the top ten list of the highest-grossing movies of all time, climbing to eighth with $1.142 billion and counting.

Despite falling to third in the States behind Pitch Perfect 2 and Mad Max: Fury Road is closing in on $375 million domestically, with a further $770.5 million from international markets, including $156.3 million in China, where it opened on Monday.

See Also: Animated storyboard offers up an alternate look at Hulk vs Hulkbuster from Avengers: Age of Ultron

Age of Ultron has knocked Skyfall ($1.109 billion) out of the top ten list, as well as overtaking The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King ($1.119 billion) and Transformers: Dark of the Moon ($1.124 billion). It is closing in fast on Iron Man 3 ($1.215 billion), but still trails the year’s highest grossing movie Fast & Furious 7, which currently sits »

- Gary Collinson

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Gillian Anderson, Kodi Smit-McPhee set to 'Croak'

12 May 2015 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Cornerstone to sell comedy from ParaNorman director.

X-Files star Gillian Anderson is set to star alongside Kodi Smit-McPhee in the first live-action film from director Sam Fell.

Smith-McPhee is in final negotiations to star in Croak, which would reunite him with his ParaNorman director. The young actor, seen opposite Michael Fassbender in Sundance title Slow West, was recently cast as Nightcrawler in the upcoming X-Men: Apocalypse.

Also cast is newcomer Tilda Cobham-Hervey (52 Tuesdays).

Alison Thompson and Mark Gooder’s new sales outfit, Cornerstone Films, is introducing the fantastical feature to buyers in Cannes. UTA is handling the Us.

Nicole Carmen-Davis, Rebekah Gilbertson and Philippa Campbell are producing the film, written by Lucy Moore, which centres on a world-weary 17-year-old Jenny (Cobham-Hervey) and mysterious, geeky Marcus (Smit-McPhee) - a young grim reaper living somewhere between the land of the living and oblivion.

Anderson is to play the character of the grim “Mistress” who keeps a watchful eye over »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Every Best Picture Oscar Winner, Ranked From Worst to Best

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the release of "Crash" (on May 6, 2005), an all-star movie whose controversy came not from its provocative treatment of racial issues but from its Best Picture Oscar victory a few months later, against what many critics felt was a much more deserving movie, "Brokeback Mountain."

The "Crash" vs. "Brokeback" battle is one of those lingering disputes that makes the Academy Awards so fascinating, year after year. Moviegoers and critics who revisit older movies are constantly judging the Academy's judgment. Even decades of hindsight may not always be enough to tell whether the Oscar voters of a particular year got it right or wrong. Whether it's "Birdman" vs. "Boyhood," "The King's Speech" vs. "The Social Network," "Saving Private Ryan" vs. "Shakespeare in Love" or even "An American in Paris" vs. "A Streetcar Named Desire," we're still confirming the Academy's taste or dismissing it as hopelessly off-base years later. »

- Gary Susman

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'Lord of the Rings' cinematographer Andrew Lesnie dies aged 59

28 April 2015 9:21 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Oscar-winner, who worked with Peter Jackson on the Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogies, most recently collaborated with Russell Crowe on The Water Diviner.

The unexpected death of Australian cinematographer Andrew Lesnie has sparked an outpouring of touching sentiment about his skills behind the camera, his huge contribution to his own and New Zealand cinema and also, from those who knew him, his decency and goodwill.

“After 17 years and eight movies together, the loss of Andrew is very hard to bear,” said Peter Jackson in a Facebook post this evening. He described him as “one of the great cinematographers of our time” and “an irreplaceable part of my family” who “always had my back”.

Jackson sought him out for the fantasy/adventure The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring because of the quality of his work on the Australian fairytale Babe. The New Zealand-based collaboration earned Lesnie the 2002 Academy Award for his cinematography »

- Sandy.George@me.com (Sandy George)

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Oscar-winning 'Lord of the Rings' cinematographer Andrew Lesnie has died

27 April 2015 9:57 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Andrew Lesnie, the Oscar-winning cinematographer of the "Lord of the Rings" and "Hobbit" franchises, has reportedly died of a heart attack. He was 59. Initial reports surfaced late Monday night on Twitter and Ain't It Cool News' Eric Vespe confirmed the reports soon after. Lesnie's family is expected to make an official statement at a later time. Devastating news from home. The master of the light, genius Andrew Lesnie has passed on . — Russell Crowe (@russellcrowe) April 28, 2015 Lesnie received his Academy Award for "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring" in 2002, a towering achievement that represented a visionary new direction for epic filmmaking, courtesy of director Peter Jackson. He was then inexplicably passed over for nominations for "The Two Towers" and particularly the 11-Oscar sweeper "The Return of the King," each of them no less stunning (and indeed, part of an organic whole). Lesnie was behind the camera on »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Richard Corliss Remembered: A Great Critic of the Movies, and of Criticism Itself

24 April 2015 5:28 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

We film critics have an often infuriating tendency to write as much about ourselves, and the state of our profession, as we do about the movies. This is hardly a new phenomenon, of course, but it may be more prevalent than ever before: Whether we’re seeking out pockets of online validation or trying to provoke those with whom we violently disagree (or both), the rise of social media has made it all too easy to engage directly with our ideological allies and adversaries alike. At the same time, the continual thinning of our professional ranks has fueled endless arguments and think-pieces about whether the Internet has succeeded in decimating or diversifying the field.

All of which makes it particularly important to remember Richard Corliss — not just because the veteran Time critic hailed from that honorable, not-yet-bygone tradition of wordsmiths who composed sharp, beautifully considered reviews for the printed page, »

- Justin Chang

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We need to talk about Peter Jackson's obsession with orcs

19 April 2015 1:00 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

As brash, boisterous box office spectacle, Peter Jackson's Middle-earth movies are unquestionably a triumph. His early 2000s adaptation of The Lord of the Rings captured the sweep and - via that ending that never ended - the introspection of the source material.

While his Hobbit trilogy is less universally beloved, who could argue that the battle scenes pack a wallop or that, in Benedict Cumberbatch's Smaug, Jackson has given us one of the great on-screen dragons?

Whatever your opinion of Jackson's juggernaut, though, there is one indisputable weakness baked into his cinematic interpretation of Middle-earth. He is obsessed with orcs, those stock swords and sorcery nasties with terminally bad skin and the deportment of '80s football hooligans hopped up on Special Brew.

This was made depressingly obvious one third of the way through last year's Battle of the Five Armies as The Necromancer was casually bundled off stage, »

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Win Passes To The Advance Screening of Russell Crowe’s The Water Diviner in St. Louis

13 April 2015 8:44 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Wamg has your free passes to the advance screening of Warner Bros. Pictures’ The Water Diviner.

Academy Award winner Russell Crowe (Gladiator) makes his directorial debut on The Water Diviner, an epic and inspiring tale of one man’s life-changing journey of discovery.

Crowe also stars in the film as Australian farmer Joshua Connor, who, in 1919, goes in search of his three missing sons, last known to have fought against the Turks in the bloody Battle of Gallipoli. Arriving in Istanbul, he is thrust into a vastly different world, where he encounters others who have suffered their own losses in the conflict: Ayshe (Olga Kurylenko), a strikingly beautiful but guarded hotelier raising a child alone; her young, spirited son, Orhan (Dylan Georgiades), who finds a friend in Connor; and Major Hasan (Yilmaz Erdoğan), a Turkish officer who fought against Connor’s boys and who may be this father’s only hope. »

- Movie Geeks

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10 Problems Only People From Gondor Will Understand

25 March 2015 6:56 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

New Line Cinema

Gondor is the greatest realm of men in all of Middle Earth. Home to stories of heroics and legend that would make King Arthur look like C3PO by comparison, it is rightly revered in both Jrr Tolkien and Peter Jackson’s Lord Of The Rings trilogies. It is the key kingdom of the entire story – basically the Kings Landing of Middle Earth. Battles are fought here, tides of war are turned here and even the title of the last film is named after its king.

Scene of the awesome climactic battle in The Return Of The King, host to one of the most epic speeches of the entire Lotr universe, not to mention the hard hitting sibling drama of the Gondor princes Boromir and Faramir, Gondor is up there with the very greatest kingdoms ever committed to celluloid or page.

But what would it really be »

- Lee Gant

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Celebrity Showdown: Kate Winslet vs Cate Blanchett

22 March 2015 7:37 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

This weekend, two of the most celebrated leading ladies in Hollywood, Kate Winslet and Cate Blanchett, went head-to-head as villains in their respective big budget blockbusters.

Winslet's Insurgent opened this weekend with a respectable $54 million, knocking Blanchett's Cinderella into second. To its credit, Disney's live-action adaptation opened with an impressive $67.8 million the weekend prior and has accumulated a domestic total to $122 million in just two weeks.

News: Celebrity Showdown: Hugh Jackman vs Liam Neeson

But how do the two Oscar winners stack up against one another? That's what Et's Celebrity Showdown is here to discover. Looking at seven unique criteria that weigh box-office earnings, critic's reviews, and award season gold, Celebrity Showdown examines the anatomy of both stars' careers to determine who's really the best.

So who will win between the Cate "The Pretty Tolkien Elf" Blanchett and Kate "Seriously, I was in Titanic" Winslet? For fun, take a guess, then check out »

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'Two and a Half Men,' 'Parks and Recreation,' and How to End a Series

27 February 2015 3:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

I don't envy any showrunner who has to write a series finale, especially after observing the very different reactions over the past few days to the final episodes of "Two and a Half Men" and "Parks and Recreation."

Consensus on the former seems to be outrage mixed with bafflement, while response to the latter seems to have been copious tears mixed with warm fuzzies.

Looking at both finales, however, it appears each long-running sitcom ended with an episode that was true to what the series was about. The literally cartoonish "Two and a Half Men" finale, which (spoiler alert) wrapped with pianos being dropped on both the characters and on creator Chuck Lorre, was a fittingly nihilistic send-off for a show that seemed to find all its characters loathsome and had little regard for the humanity of any of them, except insofar as Lorre could use them for punching bags and punchlines. »

- Gary Susman

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Why do Oscars hate sequels?

25 February 2015 5:28 AM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

When "Big Hero 6" won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature over frontrunner "How to Train Your Dragon 2," it was considered a huge upset. But, really, we should have seen this coming. After all, the Oscars hate sequels. -Break- Related: Do Oscars hate women? Indeed, since the Best Animated Feature was created in 2001, only one sequel has claimed victory: "Toy Story 3" (2010). But that was also a Best Picture nominee with a whopping five nominations, so it was clearly beloved by the entire Academy. In other words, "Toy Story 3" was a rare exception to the sequel rule. The Oscars don't just hate animated sequels, they also can't stand rewarding sequels as Best Picture, either. In fact, out of the 87 Best Picture champs, only two have been sequels: "The Godfather Part II" (1974) and "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" (2003). Hmm, what if we were to expand the def. »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 40 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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