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More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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J. Hoberman’s Best Movies of the 21st Century

20 June 2017 2:50 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There have been a lot of lists about the best films of the 21st century. IndieWire has been digging through the last two decades one genre at a time; meanwhile, the New York Times’ top movie critics provided their own takes. J. Hoberman, the longtime Village Voice film critic who now works as a freelancer, decided to join the fray. Here’s his take, also available at his site, and republished here with permission. 

People have been asking me, so I thought I might as well join (or crash) the party initiated by the New York Times and put in my two cents regarding the 25 Best Films of the 21st Century (so far). I don’t see “everything” anymore and I haven’t been to Cannes since 2011.

There is some overlap but this is not the same as the proposed 21-film syllabus of 21st Century cinema included in my book “Film After Film.” Those were all in their way pedagogical choices. Begging the question of what “best” means, these are all movies that I really like, that I’m happy to see multiple times, that are strongly of their moment and that I think will stand the test of time.

My single “best” film-object is followed by a list of 11 filmmakers and one academic production company (in order of “best-ness”) responsible for two or more “best films,” these followed by another eight individual movies (again in order) and finally four more tentatively advanced films (these alphabetical). I’m sure I’m forgetting some but that’s the nature of the beast.

Christian Marclay: “The Clock

Lars von Trier: “Dogville” & “Melancholia” (and none of his others)

Hou Hsiao Hsien: “The Assassin” & “Flight of the Red Balloon

Jean-Luc Godard: “In Praise of Love” & “Goodbye to Language”

David Cronenberg: “Spider,” “A History of Violence,” “Eastern Promises,” & “A Dangerous Method

David Lynch: “Mulholland Drive” & “Inland Empire

Ken Jacobs: “Seeking the Monkey King,” “The Guests” (and more)

Cristi Puiu: “The Death of Mr Lazarescu” & “Aurora

Chantal Akerman: “No Home Movie” & “La Captive” (assuming that 2000 is part of the 21st Century)

Paul Thomas Anderson: “The Master” & “There Will Be Blood

Kathryn Bigelow: “The Hurt Locker” & “Zero Dark Thirty

Alfonso Cuarón: “Gravity” & “Children of Men

Sensory Ethnology Lab: “Leviathan,” “Manakamana,” & “People’s Park”

“The Strange Case of Angelica” — Manoel de Oliviera

“Corpus Callosum” — Michael Snow

“West of the Tracks” — Wang Bing

“Carlos” — Olivier Assayas

“Che” — Steven Soderbergh

“Ten” — Abbas Kariostami

“Russian Ark” — Aleksandr Sokurov

“The World” — Jia Zhangke

Citizenfour” — Laura Poitras

Day Night Day Night” — Julia Loktev

“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia” — Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Wall-e” — Andrew Stanton

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- J. Hoberman

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BAMcinemaFest Review: ‘Gemini’ is a Fantastic Neo-Noir

14 June 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

There is a moment in Aaron Katz’s Gemini when Jill LeBeau (Lola Kirke), who has become the prime suspect in a murder, needs to hide from the police and find a disguise. Out of every possible option, she goes for a blonde wig with bangs, something that makes her look like Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity. She looks perhaps even more conspicuous in her costume than in her daily look, but she manages to slink from law enforcement time and again because Gemini is the kind of film that exists in “movie universe,” a self-referential place where characters, unbeknownst to them, move according to the whims of their creators.

Gemini is also a fantastic neo-noir set in the Thief-inspired Los Angeles of Drive, an upside-down city, as captured in the surrealistic opening credits by cinematographer Andrew Reed, where morals have all but vanished, leaving behind only a group of »

- Jose Solís

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How I became a fan of Twin Peaks in two weeks

14 June 2017 6:59 AM, PDT | The Cultural Post | See recent The Cultural Post news »

If I’m completely honest, I’m not much of a David Lynch fan. I don’t get along with the surreal. My only two experiences with his work are Dune (1984) which I found confusing and boring and Mulholland Drive (2001) which weirded me out so much I decided there and then that he’s not my cup of tea. I’d always known about Twin Peaks (1990-1991) hearing the incessant praise over the years and I was aware that Lynch co-created it, but due to my now regarded dislike for his work, I avoided at all costs.

Needless to say, when they announced a new series and everybody lost their minds, I didn’t really understand it. However, in my maturing years I’ve become more open to new experiences and learned to love the weird and wonderful. After a colleague commented how amazing the first couple of episodes of series 3 were, »

- Tom Batt

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How Two IndieWire Co-Founders Helped Save the Original ‘Twin Peaks’ — Exclusive Video

11 June 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Saving a TV show wasn’t always as simple as getting a hashtag trending on Twitter. Back in 1991, as the second season of “Twin Peaks” was declining in both quality and ratings, ABC decided to pull the plug on the cult sensation without even airing its last six episodes. That didn’t sit well with the show’s diehards, who called themselves Coop (Citizens Opposed to the Offing of ‘Peaks’) and launched a successful letter-writing campaign.

Among the principals of Coop was IndieWire co-founders Eugene Hernandez and Cheri Barner, who took an active role in Coop’s Los Angeles chapter (it was formed in Washington, D.C.). For their efforts, they and other Coopers were eventually rewarded with a visit to the “Twin Peaks” set as it neared its finale, plus signed notes from both David Lynch and Catherine Coulson. (Also involved was Jennifer Syme, who later went on to »

- Michael Nordine

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How Two IndieWire Co-Founders Helped Save the Original ‘Twin Peaks’ — Exclusive Video

11 June 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Saving a TV show wasn’t always as simple as getting a hashtag trending on Twitter. Back in 1991, as the second season of “Twin Peaks” was declining in both quality and ratings, ABC decided to pull the plug on the cult sensation without even airing its last six episodes. That didn’t sit well with the show’s diehards, who called themselves Coop (Citizens Opposed to the Offing of ‘Peaks’) and launched a successful letter-writing campaign.

Among the principals of Coop was IndieWire co-founders Eugene Hernandez and Cheri Barner, who took an active role in Coop’s Los Angeles chapter (it was formed in Washington, D.C.). For their efforts, they and other Coopers were eventually rewarded with a visit to the “Twin Peaks” set as it neared its finale, plus signed notes from both David Lynch and Catherine Coulson. (Also involved was Jennifer Syme, who later went on to »

- Michael Nordine

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Naomi Watts Gets Randy with "Gypsy"

8 June 2017 6:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Chris here. Just because it's Tony's week doesn't mean we've got only one Gypsy on our mind. Have you forgotten about Naomi Watt's upcoming Netflix series so soon? Well, the streaming platform is here to remind you with the first series trailer - and I have to admit that the show looks far more tantalizing than it did on paper.

Gypsy stars Watts as a therapist who begins to get a little too touchy feely with her patients, including indie brood boy Karl Glusman. With a suspecting husband at home (Billy Crudup, *sigh* isn't it wonderful that he seems to be everywhere nowadays?) the trysts spin into a compulsive thrill of a double life. The first two episodes will be directed by Fifty Shades of Grey's Sam Taylor-Johnson, so expect plenty of kinkiness to go with its character pathos.

Of course, hopping over to television has been in fashion »

- Chris Feil

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Joe versus the Volcano

6 June 2017 1:36 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

“May you live to be a thousand years old, sir.” Still the most widely unheralded great movie on the books, John Patrick Shanley’s lightweight/profound fable is an unmitigated delight. See Tom Hanks at the end of the first phase of his career plus Meg Ryan in an unacknowledged career highlight. How can a movie be so purposely insubstantial, and yet be ‘heavier’ than a dozen pictures with ‘big things to say?’

Joe Versus the Volcano

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1990 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 20, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Lloyd Bridges, Robert Stack, Abe Vigoda,

Dan Hedaya, Barry McGovern, Amanda Plummer, Ossie Davis

Cinematography Stephen Goldblatt

Production Designer Bo Welch

Film Editors Richard Halsey, Kenneth Wannberg

Original Music Georges Delerue

Produced by Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall, Steven Spielberg and Teri Schwartz

Written and Directed by John Patrick Shanley

 

I think I found »

- Glenn Erickson

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 5 Recap: I Love How You Love Me

6 June 2017 3:19 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.The key image in Part 5 of the revived Twin Peaks is of a woman in ecstasy. Recall, however, the subtitle that series co-creator/director David Lynch appended to his thorny 2006 masterpiece Inland Empire: "A Woman in Trouble." The line separating rapture and anguish is a blurry one, especially for Lynch's ladies, who are as likely to end up exquisitely chiseled corpses (the ubiquitous Laura Palmer; Part 2's doomed henchwoman Darya) as they are world-weary survivors. For the moment, let's focus on Rebecca "Becky" Burnett (Amanda Seyfried), daughter of Rr Diner waitress Shelly Johnson (Mädchen Amick), though Becky's last name—taken from ne'er-do-well husband Steven Burnett (Caleb Landry Jones)—obscures the identity of her father. (Dana Ashbrook's now-law-abiding Bobby Briggs is the most likely candidate, »

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'Twin Peaks' Recap: Dougie, Fresh

4 June 2017 8:41 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

So it seems that Twin Peaks is gunning for being the comedy sensation of 2017.

Wild, right? It's funny to think about how just two weeks ago, a mainline dose of co-creator/director David Lynch's most abstract and brutal work in years made the goofball charms of Peaks 1.0 seem a million miles away – for three or so episodes, anyway. But then Dale Cooper reentered the real world in the guise of one Dougie Jones, a Vegas-area insurance agent with bad habits and worse jackets, and hilarity ensued. So now, we »

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‘Twin Peaks’: The 6 Craziest Revival Fan Theories, Ranked

2 June 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

From the first glimpse of that weird bird that heralds the arrival of “Twin Peaks,” the television series plunged viewers into the palm of David Lynch’s hand. It’s a weird and wondrous place to be, which makes it prime fodder for fan theories. If ever a show’s symbology deserved an IMDb page, this would be it.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: Why It Shouldn’t Have Changed Its Opening Titles

Thanks to Showtime, Lynch has free rein to complete the “Twin Peaks” story arc, a process that has him referencing his own “Lost Highway,” “Eraserhead,” and, most of all, “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.” Of course, it’s Lynch so all of this effectively clarifies nothing  — but nature hates a vacuum, and that’s why we have ample fan theories to close the gap.

So, here are six of the best fan theories for the revival series’ first four episodes, »

- Jamie Righetti

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‘Twin Peaks’: The 6 Craziest Revival Fan Theories, Ranked

2 June 2017 7:15 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

From the first glimpse of that weird bird that heralds the arrival of “Twin Peaks,” the television series plunged viewers into the palm of David Lynch’s hand. It’s a weird and wondrous place to be, which makes it prime fodder for fan theories. If ever a show’s symbology deserved an IMDb page, this would be it.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: Why It Shouldn’t Have Changed Its Opening Titles

Thanks to Showtime, Lynch has free rein to complete the “Twin Peaks” story arc, a process that has him referencing his own “Lost Highway,” “Eraserhead,” and, most of all, “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.” Of course, it’s Lynch so all of this effectively clarifies nothing  — but nature hates a vacuum, and that’s why we have ample fan theories to close the gap.

So, here are six of the best fan theories for the revival series’ first four episodes, »

- Jamie Righetti

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When In Disgrace With Fortune and Men's Eyes: Close-Up on Nicholas Ray's "In a Lonely Place"

2 June 2017 4:39 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Nicholas Ray's In a Lonely Place (1950) is playing  June 2 - July 2, 2017 on Mubi in the United Kingdom as part of the series The American Noir.Although mostly remembered now by the public for his 1955 classic Rebel Without a Cause, Nicholas Ray left behind him a legacy of over twenty feature films. A veritable cinematic explorer, Ray traversed genres ranging from noir, western (most notably his 1954 gender-bending cult Trucolor extravaganza Johnny Guitar), melodrama, epic and experimental film. He dared as few would to shoot in remote and forbidding locations such as the Arctic and Everglades National Park.  What are Ray’s films about? As in his signature piece Rebel, despite Ray’s wide-ranging endeavors in genre and subject matter we are often met with anti-hero protagonists who struggle and rail against authority while lamenting their meaningless and circumscribed existences. »

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‘Twin Peaks: The Return’ Proves David Lynch Still Has a Woman Problem (Commentary)

31 May 2017 1:21 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

There’s a moment in the new season of “Twin Peaks” where it becomes clear that after more than three decades making movies and TV, David Lynch still has a prominent male gaze. The iconic director and writer — known for surreal, small town soap opera “Twin Peaks” as well as films like “Blue Velvet” and “Mulholland Drive” — has been the subject of criticism for years about his treatment of women onscreen. While he has created some of the most memorable female characters, they often become the subjects of voyeurism and also assault. It happens early in the new Showtime series, »

- Carli Velocci

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"Twin Peaks," Episodes 3 & 4 Recap: Hell-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!

30 May 2017 8:44 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.What's an FBI Special Agent to do after being locked away for 25 years in unearthly purgatory? Episodes three and four of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks, which aired on Showtime this past Sunday in a two-hour block (aside from September's two-part finale, it's all single, hour-long episodes from hereon out), follow our besuited, Black Lodge-incarcerated hero Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) as he reintegrates into modern terrestrial society. So this is basically Peaks doing Rectify, just with a sterile death row replaced by an infernal hellscape out of Clive Barker. Or David Lynch, really. What's becoming more and more evident as the new Peaks progresses is that the series is, in large part, a repository for Lynch's subconscious, past and present. »

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‘Twin Peaks’: Naomi Watts Reunited With David Lynch After 15 Years, And It Was An Acting Powerhouse

30 May 2017 8:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Four episodes in to “Twin Peaks: The Return” and one thing has become quite clear: David Lynch and Mark Frost are having no problem delivering some of the series’ most memorable scenes to date. From those vicious glass box murders to Agent Cooper, dazed from spending 25 years in the Black Lodge, making a fortune off slot machines at a Las Vegas casino (“Helloooo!” is already an instant classic “Twin Peaks” quote), the series is operating at the height of its powers right now. But while the revival has been an embarrassment of riches from scene to scene, one moment that has gotten lost in the conversation is the introduction of Janey-e Jones in Episode 4.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Episode 4 is a Gift Filled with Answers — and A Warning About Wanting More

It’s frankly quite strange more people aren’t talking about Janey-e. The character is played by none »

- Zack Sharf

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‘Twin Peaks’: Naomi Watts Reunited With David Lynch After 15 Years, And It Was An Acting Powerhouse

30 May 2017 8:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Four episodes in to “Twin Peaks: The Return” and one thing has become quite clear: David Lynch and Mark Frost are having no problem delivering some of the series’ most memorable scenes to date. From those vicious glass box murders to Agent Cooper, dazed from spending 25 years in the Black Lodge, making a fortune off slot machines at a Las Vegas casino (“Helloooo!” is already an instant classic “Twin Peaks” quote), the series is operating at the height of its powers right now. But while the revival has been an embarrassment of riches from scene to scene, one moment that has gotten lost in the conversation is the introduction of Janey-e Jones in Episode 4.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Episode 4 is a Gift Filled with Answers — and A Warning About Wanting More

It’s frankly quite strange more people aren’t talking about Janey-e. The character is played by none »

- Zack Sharf

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‘Twin Peaks 3×04′ Review

30 May 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

This episode is the one we’ve been waiting for, with Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) coming face to face with Gordon Cole (David Lynch) and Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer). Typically for Twin Peaks though, nothing is as it seems.

With Agent Cooper playing happy families as Dougie Jones, the other “Coop” faces his old boss and Albert. It isn’t long before they see through his act though. With mention of Philip Jeffries, will more be revealed from the Black Lodge?

In this fourth episode, we are getting more into what would be normal Twin Peaks territory, but with more of a hint of Fire Walk with Me. The movie, which works as a prequel to the series, introduced the idea of the Blue Rose investigation, and more importantly David Bowie’s character Philip Jeffries. The mention of this character has hinted at the potential of a cameo from Bowie, and this could be possible. »

- Paul Metcalf

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David Lynch might make another film after all

26 May 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kirsten Howard May 26, 2017

Filmmaker and Twin Peaks mastermind David Lynch assures fans that remarks about his retirement were misrepresented...

Fans of David Lynch were devastated recently when the director seemingly told The Sydney Morning Herald that he had quit making films for good.

See related  Square Enix putting Deus Ex franchise on hold

The perennially oddball force behind decades of weird Americana like Blue Velvet, Wild At Heart and the newly-revived series Twin Peaks mused in the interview earlier this month that "things changed a lot. So many films were not doing well at the box office even though they might have been great films and the things that were doing well at the box office weren't the things that I would want to do."

He was then pressed on whether he was officially done shaping things for the big screen. "He is uncertain at first, but then appears to »

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‘Mulholland Drive’ Blu-ray Review

26 May 2017 4:01 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Ann Miller | Written and Directed by David Lynch

Re-released to coincide with the new Twin Peaks series, it’s apt that Mulholland Drive was originally conceived as a TV pilot. Perhaps it’s for the best it ended up in (relatively) short form. The film, weighing in at 2.5 hours, is an epic mind-bender on its own terms, and there’s barely a wasted frame.

It begins with a car accident on Mulholland Drive. A woman, who will become known as Rita (Laura Harring), survives with a knock to the head. She stumbles away and hides in an empty house. The house belongs to Aunt Ruth, whose niece Betty (Naomi Watts) arrives the next day. She’s come to L.A. with the dream of an acting career. Rita and Betty become friends. But Rita can’t remember anything – not even her real name »

- Rupert Harvey

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