6.9/10
14,963
162 user 82 critic

East Is East (1999)

R | | Comedy, Drama | 2 June 2000 (USA)
In early 1970s England, a Pakistani father finds the authority he has previously maintained challenged by his increasingly Anglicized children.

Director:

Writers:

(play), (screenplay)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 4 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 16 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Jordan Routledge ...
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Meenah Khan
Emil Marwa ...
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Ian Aspinall ...
Nazir Khan
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Emma Rydal ...
Stella Moorhouse
...
Peggy
Ben Keaton ...
Priest
Kriss Dosanjh ...
Poppa Khalid
John Bardon ...
Mr. Moorhouse
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Storyline

In 1971 Salford fish-and-chip shop owner George Khan expects his family to follow his strict Pakistani Muslim ways. But his children, with an English mother and having been born and brought up in Britain, increasingly see themselves as British and start to reject their father's rules on dress, food, religion, and living in general. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A comedy of families, a chip shop... and a very randy dog. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Language:

|

Release Date:

2 June 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Kelet az Kelet  »

Box Office

Budget:

£1,900,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£435,627 (UK) (5 November 1999)

Gross:

$4,170,647 (USA) (8 September 2000)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song that Meenah dances to is "Inhi Logon Ne" from Pakeezah (1972). See more »

Goofs

In the film they constantly use the term "shillings" when referring to prices and money. Britain adopted the pounds and pence decimal system on the 15th February 1971 and over the next year or two ditched the shilling and pence currency. In the opening scene of the film the caption read "Salford, Manchester, 1971" and after the eldest brother ran away from his marriage a second caption, in more or less the second or third scene, then read "six months later" thus meaning that Britain had changed currency the currency over. As a result, when one of the brothers keeps begging his mum for ten shillings etc, while it may sound factually incorrect, there was a changeover period and use of both currencies was permitted. Shilling coins remained legal tender and in circulation for many years, the sixpence remained in circulation until 1980 for machines, but was removed from general use after 1973; conversely the 50 New Pence coin (worth ten shillings) was introduced two years before decimalisation. People didn't stop using the word "shilling" for many years although by 1974, the use of old money had gone. See more »

Quotes

Mr. Moorhouse: See. You let one of 'em in, and the whole fuckin' tribe turns up.
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Crazy Credits

Special thanks to ... and all the residents of Openshaw. See more »

Connections

Features The Clangers (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

Sitting in the Park
(1965)
Written by Billy Stewart (as Stewart)
Used by permission of EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
Performed by Georgie Fame
Courtesy of Polydor UK Limited
Licensed by kind permission from PolyGram Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

Touching and unpredictable
17 December 1999 | by (York) – See all my reviews

Engaging, well-made comedy based on the play by Ayub Khan-Din concerning the misfortunes of an Anglo-Pakistani family verging on the brink of change in early 1970s Salford. Traditional dad Om Puri is shocked when his oldest son (Ian Aspinall) runs away from an arranged wedding, and decides that from now on his family will be more respectful. Among his plans are the weddings of two of his other sons, both of whom are far from delighted with the idea. Khan-Din's fine script never resorts to cliche resulting in a funny, study of the clash between the old and the new.

Linda Bassett as superb as Puri's second wife, an English woman who straddles both camps between her husband's traditionalism and her kids' sense of rebellion while nonetheless attempting to keep her own dignity.

Fine performances from Chris Bisson and Jimmi Harkishin (Coronation Street) and Jimi Mistry (EastEnders) while little Jordan Routledge is great as the parka-loving Sajid.

However, it's Puri who shines as the complex father, desperately trying to hang on to tradition and finding nothing but rebellion from his family.

The ending could easily have been a familiar family seeks revenge on their overbearing father but what results is a refreshing change to the many TV movies that usually opt for an easy solution to a difficult problem.


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