This entry in the "See America First" series focuses on the ten years prior to the US Civil War. We see monuments and buildings associated with people and places of that era. Some of these ... See full summary »
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Cast

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John B. Kennedy ...
Himself / Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

This entry in the "See America First" series focuses on the ten years prior to the US Civil War. We see monuments and buildings associated with people and places of that era. Some of these are: a monument to slaves in Nachitoches, Louisiana; the Brunswick, Maine home of Harriet Beecher Stowe, where she wrote the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin"; Fort Nashboro in Nashville, Tennessee; composer Stephen Foster's home in Bardstown, Kentucky; the grave of abolitionist John Brown at his family's farm in North Elba, New York; and Andrew Jackson's home, The Hermitage. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Plot Keywords:

1850s | narration | See All (2) »

Genres:

Documentary | Short

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Release Date:

9 February 1935 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

See America First No. 6: Dixieland  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #1743. See more »

Soundtracks

The Battle Hymn of the Republic
Music by William Steffe and lyrics by Julia Ward Howe
Music adapted from "John Brown's Body"
Performed by the studio orchestra
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User Reviews

Well Worth Checking Out
29 August 2009 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Dixieland (1934)

*** (out of 4)

The sixth entry in Warner's "See America First" series, which was made to show current audiences things from the past. This entry takes a look at the years between 1850-60. I'm not sure how much use film buffs will get out of this short but fans of history should be in for a treat. We start off seeing a slave monument in Louisiana and then are shown a 114-year-old man who was believed to be the oldest living slave. Seeing how he was currently living was certainly interesting as we later get to see the home where Harriett Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin. We also get a trip to the Bluegrass state with viewings of Lincoln's log cabin and the home where Stephen Foster wrote My Old Kentucky Home. As you can tell, there's a lot to see visiting these now historic sites so this short probably works even better today than it did back in 1934. Living in Kentucky, I've been to the places highlighted here and it's worth noting that Lincoln's cabin has now moved but Foster's home looks exactly like it did in this short.


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