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(1999)

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Watch: Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman’s 70-Minute Cinematography Master Class

The 55th New York Film Festival brought together cinematographers Vittorio Storaro (The Conformist, Apocalypse Now) and Ed Lachman (Carol, The Limey) for a master class on the occasion of both having films in the fest’s main slate. Lachman lensed Todd Haynes’ Centerpiece film Wonderstruck and Storaro did Woody Allen’s Closing Night film Wonder Wheel.

Festival director Kent Jones hosted the two at the Walter Reade Theater on October 11 for an all-encompassing talk of their cinematic philosophies and the cinematographers’ 40-year friendship.

Storaro and Lachman showed clips from films that inspire them and clips of their own work. The clips were a launching pad to discuss the difficult-to-pin cinematic language of photographic storytelling. We’ve included key quotes from their talk and the complete video of masterclass below.

Lachman on Storaro

Vittorio has done more in the last 50 years for the recognition and esteem of cinematography than anybody.

Becoming
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cinematography Legends Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Give a Once-in-a-Lifetime Master Class – Watch

Cinematography Legends Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman Give a Once-in-a-Lifetime Master Class – Watch
One of the joys of the New York Film Festival is that for 18 days the greatest international filmmakers descend on Lincoln Center not only to share their most recent films, but to engage in a conversation about their work and career.

This year, two of the greatest living cinematographers, Vittorio Storaro and Ed Lachman, had films at the fest – “Wonder Wheel” and “Wonderstruck” – and for 90-minutes shared the stage with festival director Kent Jones to discuss the craft to which they’ve dedicated their lives. IndieWire has the exclusive video of the entire “Master Class” below.

Lachman has shot a number of the seminal American films of the last the 30 years, including Sofia Coppola’s “Virgin Suicides” and Steven Soderbergh’s “The Limey,” but it’s been his 15-year collaboration with director Todd Haynes (“Carol”) that has defined his career. Storaro is best know to American audiences for having shot
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Gotti’ Trailer: John Travolta Resurrects Mob Boss in Kevin Connolly-Directed Biopic

  • Indiewire
‘Gotti’ Trailer: John Travolta Resurrects Mob Boss in Kevin Connolly-Directed Biopic
Six years and two title changes after the project was announced, John Travolta will finally star as the titular Gambino family Mafioso in “Gotti.” Good Morning America debuted the film’s first trailer on Sept. 26, depicting the allegedly Gotti-ordered hit on his predecessor, Paul Castellano (Donald John Volpenhein), followed by his own demise from “The Teflon Don”—gleaming pompadour, designer suits—to a bald, craggy-faced inmate. Gotti died serving a murder sentence in 2002 at age 61; the cause was throat cancer. One of his sons, John Gotti Jr., helped advise director Kevin Connolly, and even provided Travolta with his father’s jewelry and ties to get into character.

Making “Gotti” was an unusual family bonding exercise for Travolta, who was last an Oscar nominee as “Pulp Fiction” hitman Vincent Vega: his real life wife (Kelly Preston) and daughter (Ella Bleu Travolta) play his relatives onscreen. On the steps of a courthouse,
See full article at Indiewire »

Telluride: ‘Wonderstruck’ Lenser Ed Lachman Reflects on His Career

Telluride: ‘Wonderstruck’ Lenser Ed Lachman Reflects on His Career
The Telluride Film Festival has held tributes for but a handful cinematographers over the last 44 years. The names are titans of the form: Karl Struss (“Sunrise,” “The Great Dictator”), Sven Nykvist (“Cries & Whispers,” “Fanny and Alexander”), John Alton (“An American in Paris,” “Elmer Gantry”), Vittorio Storaro (“Apocalypse Now,” “The Last Emperor”). This year, on the heels of a lifetime achievement prize from the American Society of Cinematographers earlier this year, Ed Lachman joins their ranks.

Oscar-nominated for “Far From Heaven” and “Carol,” Lachman is a frequent collaborator of director Todd Haynes. This year’s celebration of his work is pegged to their latest, “Wonderstruck,” which is part of the festival’s main program. But Lachman’s career outstretches those three movies alone, from working with icons of pop (Madonna) and humanitarianism (Mother Teresa), to collaborations with artists at the beginning (Sofia Coppola) and end (Robert Altman) of their careers.

Lachman spoke to Variety about his career to
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: Logan Lucky Races for the Big Score, Finishing Above Average

How lucky are we? I suppose that depends upon how you feel about the work of director Steven Soderbergh. One of the most deliberately eclectic and diverse filmmakers in the history of Hollywood, Soderbergh has seen fit to shift gears abruptly from mainstream big-budget potboiler (Ocean's 11, Haywire, King of the Hill, Out of Sight) to artsy fartsy experimental throughout his entire career (Schizopolis, Bubble, Full Frontal), letting the two blend occasionally, just to keep things even more interesting (Magic Mike, Traffic, The Limey). Since his 1989 indie film world sensation sex, lies and videotape, he's never stopped. Even his much ballyhooed retirement from feature filmmaking resulted in him directing every episode of two seasons of the turn of the century medical television series, The...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Great Job, Internet!: Let’s debate Steven Soderbergh’s filmography

Steven Soderbergh frequently claims he’s retiring from directing movies, but fortunately these protests never seem to last very long. His current return from the cinematic grave is Logan Lucky, which opens this weekend; our film staff says the movie proves that Soderbergh is as great as ever. He’s had quite an illustrious film career, ever since his debut Sex, Lies & Videotape wowed audiences at Cannes in 1989. His peak (so far) was likely 2001, when he was Oscar-nominated for directing both Traffic and Erin Brockovich (winning for Traffic). There have been various ups and downs along the way, like Magic Mike, Solaris, the Ocean’s trilogy, The Limey, Bubble, The Girlfriend Experience… the list goes on.

On to about 20-some movies, which is why not one but two sites this week (that we know of) took it upon themselves to rank all of Soderbergh’s movies from ...
See full article at The AV Club »

8 Times Steven Soderbergh Broke the Rules of Filmmaking and Invented New Ones

8 Times Steven Soderbergh Broke the Rules of Filmmaking and Invented New Ones
When Steven Soderbergh is asked about the state of filmmaking, he often points to the American films of the ’60s and ’70s as a counterpoint to the broken state of today’s industry. “The bottom line is that at a certain period in time, from 1966 to 1976, the most successful movies were also the best movies, and that’s just not true anymore,” the director said in a 2014 interview.

Read More:Steven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

Soderbergh may complain a lot, but he’s never been passive about it. Throughout his career, he has constantly experimented with different ways to make and distribute his films by thinking outside the box and pioneering new technology. With “Logan Lucky,” Soderbergh’s finally fulfilling his plans to launch a self-distribution company capable of releasing a studio-size film, but it’s not the first ambitious effort in a career defined by risky maneuvers.
See full article at Indiewire »

Steven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

  • Indiewire
Steven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to Best
Steven Soderbergh’s directing career started with “Sex, Lies and Videotape,” a massive breakout that not only launched his career — it changed the industry of independent filmmaking in America. While struggling to find his footing after becoming a household name at age 26, Soderbergh never let himself become frozen by his early success or some preconceived notion of what his career would be. Instead, he dogmatically followed any story that piqued his interest, regardless if it was building the slick “Ocean’s Eleven” franchise or an experimental film he shot in his hometown with friends (“Schizopolis”).

He has been careful to build a career that was commercially viable so as to maximize his ability to be constantly creating and experimenting with films that were sometimes aggressively uncommercial. Along the way, he has fought to be as efficient a filmmaker as possible – constantly trying different approaches and new technology to make and
See full article at Indiewire »

Jack Nicholson ‘Basically Retired,’ According to Good Friend Peter Fonda

Jack Nicholson ‘Basically Retired,’ According to Good Friend Peter Fonda
Jack Nicholson will turn 80 this spring, and though the last movie he did came out in 2010, he has never officially retired. But that doesn’t mean he isn’t retired, according to Peter Fonda, with whom Nicholson has been close since the two made “Easy Rider.”

“I think he is ­basically retired,” Fonda told Page Six at this month’s BAFTA Awards Season Tea Party, held annually in Los Angeles. “I don’t want to speak for him, but he has done a lot of work and he has done very well as a person financially.”

Read More: ‘Eastern Promises’ Sequel Set to Film in Spring

Four years ago, rumors circulated that the actor was slowing down due to memory loss, but those claims were swiftly denied by his representatives. “Sometimes ­people have a reason that you don’t know, and it’s not for me to ask,” said Fonda.
See full article at Indiewire »

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in August

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in August
Ah, August, that glorious month when summer officially overstays its welcome and everyone begins praying for a respite from the blistering temperatures. With kids staying home on summer break and working stiffs having already blown through their vacation days by mid-June, there's no better time for an extended hunker-down in the living room. Netflix teams with Baz Luhrmann for a frenetic new birth-of-hip-hop drama, David Cross gives his acerbic State of the Union address in a new special, and a recent Coen brothers masterpiece comes online. Top off that iced
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Sharon Stone’s “Wee” Marvel Role Should Be the Original Wasp

Because the McU is into “very expensive nostalgia”

Sharon Stone revealed on The Late Late Show last Thursday that she’s joining the McU, and while she had no details to share because of a confidentiality agreement, she said that it’s a “wee” part. Now, that could just be in reference to the size of her role, or it could be a sneaky hint that she’s actually playing a miniaturizing superhero.

Namely Janet van Dyne, aka the original version of The Wasp.

There are good reasons why that guess is a bad one. Ant-Man and The Wasp, which is where the character would appear, doesn’t begin filming until summer 2017 for a July 2018 release, and while it’s possible such a significant part has already been cast, or at least is in the stages of being cast, Stone made it sound like she’s doing the movie “now,” as
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Interview: Cinematographer Ed Lachman Talks Romantic World Of 'Carol,' Werner Herzog, ‘I’m Not There’ & More

Pick a period and he’ll nail the look; choose an emotion and he’ll layer it visually. Over a 40-year career, cinematographer Ed Lachman has developed a story-driven approach to the films he’s shot, stemming from his beginnings in European cinema with Wim Wenders, Jean-Luc Godard, and under DPs Sven Nykvist and Vittorio Storraro. He’s also joined with American auteurs, like frequent collaborator Todd Haynes (“Far From Heaven”, “I’m Not There”), Steven Soderbergh (“The Limey”, “Erin Brockovich”) and Sofia Coppola (“The Virgin Suicides”), each time delivering occasionally experimental period pieces. Read More: Retrospective: The Films Of Todd Haynes The Playlist's recent feature on Lachman’s work acknowledged his influence, as did the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences: his latest film, Haynes’ drama “Carol” (our review), earned Lachman his second Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography (after “Far From Heaven” in 2003). Based on Patricia Highsmith’s.
See full article at The Playlist »

10 Ravishing Films Shot by ‘Carol’ Cinematographer Edward Lachman

Cinematographer Edward Lachman may not be a household name, though he undoubtedly should be. One of the most highly regarded directors of photography in the business, Lachman has collaborated with some of the best filmmakers of his generation: Steven Soderbergh, Todd Haynes, Todd Solondz, Paul Schrader, Sofia Coppola, Robert Altman, Werner Herzog, George Sluizer, Wim Wenders, Mira Nair, Ulrich Seidl, and Andrew Niccol — to name a handful.

His career began in 1975 by photographing the infamous Sylvester StalloneHenry Winkler Brooklyn gang cult-fave, The Lords of Flatbush. In the last 40 years, he’s carved out a truly varied résumé. For example: in 2002, Lachman co-directed Ken Park with filmmaker Larry Clark, before moving onto direct the exercise video Carmen Electra’s Aerobic Striptease in 2003.

Lachman’s most recent feature, Carol — his third partnership with Haynes, and perhaps his finest work — just entered a limited release, so there’s no better time to
See full article at The Film Stage »

Nyff 2015 Trailer, History of MGM, Patrick Brice’s Criterion Picks, and More

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Pawel Pawlikowski will head the BFI London Film Festival jury, joined by Christine Vachon, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kristin Scott Thomas and Mabel Cheung.

Watch the trailer for the 2015 New York Film Festival:

You Must Remember This returns with a new season on the history of MGM:

The Overnight and Creep director Patrick Brice stops by the Criterion closet:

Matt Zoller Seitz revisits The Limey:

“Tell me about Jenny,” Terence Stamp’s ex-convict Wilson demands in the opening moments of “The Limey.” But what follows is a confession in the form of prismatic memory shards—a brain-teaser, at times flirting with midnight movie stoner pretension, that somehow keeps both its storyline and its emotions clear,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Interview: The cast of Everest on shooting in extreme conditions

  • Cineplex
A star-studded cast convened to bring one of history’s great mountaineering disasters to the screen in Everest.

Based on the May 1996 incident in which eight climbers from two different parties lost their lives when the world’s tallest summit was hit by a blizzard, Icelandic director Baltasar Kormákur’s (2 Guns) 3D epic features Jake Gyllenhaal and Jason Clarke as the experienced, but ultimately overwhelmed, guides of each team. Other climbers and concerned parties are played by Josh Brolin, John Hawkes, Keira Knightley, Robin Wright, Sam Worthington, Emily Watson and Michael Kelly — the latter plays Jon Krakauer, whose book Into Thin Air is one of several personal chronicles of the disaster.

Shot in Italy, Britain and Nepal, including at Everest’s South Base Camp when an even deadlier avalanche elsewhere on the mountain took 16 lives in 2014, the film is an epic depiction of nature’s power at its most awesome,
See full article at Cineplex »

Ranking the Swank Modernist Homes of L.A. Villains

  • Vulture
Ranking the Swank Modernist Homes of L.A. Villains
In the second season of Nic Pizzolatto’s True Detective, now set in Los Angeles, entrepreneur-cum-criminal Frank Semyon (Vince Vaughn) lives in a pretty swank house. In fact, Los Angeles–based villains on film and TV always seem to live in really nice, modernist houses (often designed by John Lautner), the buildings’ glass surfaces and complex concrete contours reflecting the villains’ motives, madness, and megalomania. (Though sometimes a beautiful house is just a beautiful house.) We’ve compiled a list of great modernist houses in which villains have taken up residence, and asked New York Magazine design expert Wendy Goodman to rank them. Ahead, a worst-to-best assessment of L.A.’s more villainous homes. 8. Brent Saville, Astral House, 1995 (The Limey). “If you can afford a house like this, you buy a house like this,” says Luiz Guzmán’s small-time crook who cannot afford a house like this. Terry Valentine — Peter Fonda
See full article at Vulture »

Terence Stamp: ‘I was in my prime, but when the 60s ended, I ended with it’

He was the star of some of the decade’s most memorable films – and dated some of its most beautiful women. With the reissue of 1967’s Far From the Madding Crowd, the actor talks about his friendship with Michael Caine and his topsy-turvy career

Terence Stamp sticks his head round the door and opens his mouth. How will this legend of British acting introduce himself? What pearl of wisdom will he divulge? Stamp, self-confessed “decadent” and former holder of the title of world’s best-looking man (1963-1969) speaks: “Gotta take a slash, man. Where’s the gents?” Having been pointed in the right direction, Stamp returns, visibly relieved.

It’s funny how things work out. Now 76, Stamp had a fantastic 1960s, during which he starred in a handful of imperishable classics (Billy Budd, Ken Loach’s Poor Cow, Pasolini’s Theorem) and consorted with some of the era’s most beautiful women (Julie Christie,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Terence Stamp: ‘I was in my prime, but when the 60s ended, I ended with it’

He was the star of some of the decade’s most memorable films – and dated some of its most beautiful women. With the reissue of 1967’s Far From the Madding Crowd, the actor talks about his friendship with Michael Caine and his topsy-turvy career

Terence Stamp sticks his head round the door and opens his mouth. How will this legend of British acting introduce himself? What pearl of wisdom will he divulge? Stamp, self-confessed “decadent” and former holder of the title of world’s best-looking man (1963-1969) speaks: “Gotta take a slash, man. Where’s the gents?” Having been pointed in the right direction, Stamp returns, visibly relieved.

It’s funny how things work out. Now 76, Stamp had a fantastic 1960s, during which he starred in a handful of imperishable classics (Billy Budd, Ken Loach’s Poor Cow, Pasolini’s Theorem) and consorted with some of the era’s most beautiful women (Julie Christie,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Editors Guild Selects 75 Best Edited Films of All Time

Now this is a list that could result in a lot of fascinating dissection and thanks to HitFix it comes to our attention almost three years after it was originally released back in 2012, celebrating the Motion Picture Editors Guild's 75th anniversary. Over at HitFix, Kris Tapley asks, "Is this news to anyone elsec" Um, yes, I find it immensely interesting and a perfect starting point for anyone looking to further explore the art of film editing. In an accompanying article we get the particulars concerning what films were eligible and how films were to be considered: In our Jan-feb 12 issue, we asked Guild members to vote on what they consider to be the Best Edited Films of all time. Any feature-length film from any country in the world was eligible. And by "Best Edited," we explained, we didn't just mean picture; sound, music and mixing were to be considered as well.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What is the best-edited film of all time according to those who do the job?

  • Hitfix
A random bit of researching on a Tuesday night led me to something I didn't know existed: The Motion Picture Editors Guild's list of the 75 best-edited films of all time. It was a feature in part celebrating the Guild's 75th anniversary in 2012. Is this news to anyone else? I confess to having missed it entirely. Naturally, I had to dig in. What was immediately striking to me about the list — which was decided upon by the Guild membership and, per instruction, was considered in terms of picture and sound editorial as opposed to just the former — was the most popular decade ranking. Naturally, the 1970s led with 17 mentions, but right on its heels was the 1990s. I wouldn't have expected that but I happen to agree with the assessment. Thelma Schoonmaker's work on "Raging Bull" came out on top, an objectively difficult choice to dispute, really. It was so transformative,
See full article at Hitfix »
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