Bringing Out the Dead
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

10 items from 2015

You need discipline, Nicolas Cage. Why not see if Michael Haneke is free?

5 November 2015 10:29 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

As part of a new series in which we offer careers advice to people in the movie business, we run through the remaining options open to the yelling icon

The 1980s: smooth transition from teen flick bit-parter to ironic-funny leading man. The 90s, too. Your reboot as a boggle-eyed action hero (The Rock, Face/Off, Con Air) was a stroke of genius. From time to time, when you channel your famed eccentricity into your work, it still hits home. Bringing out the Dead, Adaptation, The Weather Man, Bad Lieutenant, Kick-Ass – loving your work.

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- Andrew Pulver

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AFM: Willem Dafoe Joins Nicolas Cage in ‘Dog Eat Dog’

29 October 2015 1:17 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Willem Dafoe has joined Nicolas Cage in thriller “Dog Eat Dog, directed by Paul Schrader for Arclight Films and Pure Dopamine.

Dog Eat Dog” is based on the book of the same name by Eddie Bunker. Matt Wilder and Schrader adapted the script about a trio of  ex-cons, deep in the underbelly of Los Angeles, who are hired for a kidnapping. When the botched abduction goes awry and gets completely out of control, the cons find themselves on the run.

Production has started in Cleveland. Mark Earl Burman of Pure Dopamine is producing. Executive producers are Gary Hamilton, Don Rivers, Tim Peternel, Shaun Redick and Ray Mansfield.

Arclight Films is handling international sales at the American Film Market. The producers introduced the project with Cage attached at Cannes.

Schrader co-wrote Martin Scorsese films “Taxi Driver,” “Raging Bull,” “The Last Temptation of Christ” and “Bringing Out the Dead.” He also directed “American Gigolo, »

- Dave McNary

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Joshua Reviews David Riker’s La Ciudad [DVD Review]

23 October 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Few years in film history have been as important and ultimately as influential as the year 1999. With some of the greatest features of the last 20 years, ranging from masterpieces by legendary auteurs (Kubrick’s Eyes Wide Shut) to underrated entries in lengthy filmographies (Scorsese’s Bringing Out The Dead) and even new auteurs announcing themselves (Spike Jonze’s Being John Malkovich), 1999 is a year truly unlike many others. Michael Mann, Pedro Almodovar, David Lynch, Sofia Coppola and Takashi Miike. David O’ Russell gave us Three Kings and Mike Leigh showed off a different side of himself with Topsy Turvy And yet, this list of great film after great film doesn’t quite scratch the surface of what 1999 had to offer.

Take David Riker’s film La Ciudad for example. Relatively forgotten among the never-ending list of great films debuting in theaters in 1999, this is unlike many of that year’s slate. »

- Joshua Brunsting

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Video of the Day: Watch a new compilation video of First and Final frames in films

30 September 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The way a film starts and the way it ends can tell a lot about a movie, as well as the particular style of the director behind the project. Numerous films throughout history have had memorable opening and closing shots that have elevated the feature in question, while also taking on a life of their own as iconic moments in cinema.

Following his first exploration of first and final frames in film, vimeo user Jacob T. Swinney has revisited the topic in a new video, looking at 70 new films and how their opening and closing mirror each other. Swinney had this to say in the episode description.

After numerous requests, I finally decided to create a sequel to “First and Final Frames”. Part II plays the opening and closing shots of 70 films side-by-side. Like the first video, some of the opening shots are strikingly similar to the final shots, while »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Cliff Curtis Turns Method Actor for ‘The Dark Horse’

24 September 2015 10:01 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

You’ve seen actor Cliff Curtis slip into the skin of countless characters before, taking on numerous ethnicities as a true chameleon of the big screen. The New Zealander is one of the most prolific and accomplished character actors of his generation, having wracked up a list of filmmaker collaborators that would make any colleague jealous.

The list is impressive, probably because great directors know what they’re going to get out of the actor: David O. Russell (“Three Kings”), Martin Scorsese (“Bringing Out the Dead”), Michael Mann (“The Insider”), Antoine Fuqua (“Training Day”), Frank Darabont (“The Majestic”), Darren Aronofsky (“The Fountain”), Danny Boyle (“Sunshine”) — each presenting a unique opportunity to stand out in an ensemble cast.

With James Napier Robertson’s “The Dark Horse,” however, Curtis took a turn into method actor territory for the first time in his career, at the director’s request. “He asked for it and he got it, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Weekend Rock Question: What Is the Best Martin Scorsese Movie?

11 September 2015 12:13 PM, PDT | | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Earlier this year, Martin Scorsese wrapped production on his long-awaited historical drama Silence. Written by Gangs of New York screenwriter Jay Cocks, it's the story of two 17th century priests that travel to Japan, starring Liam Neeson, Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver. This has been a passion project for the director for quite some time and expectations are very high.

Now we have a question for you: What is Martin Scorsese's greatest film? We're going to count anything that he directed. Feel free to vote for an early work »

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How actor Cliff Curtis avoids playing 'repetitive stereotypes'

17 August 2015 9:53 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Māori actor relishes a starring role in Walking Dead spinoff after a career filled with highs that include Scorsese and lows – The Piano

In 1999, Cliff Curtis hit a kind of American cinematic jackpot: in a single year, he had roles in Michael Mann’s The Insider, David O Russell’s Three Kings and Martin Scorsese’s Bringing Out the Dead.

“Scorsese talks tens to the dozen. He’s amazing. Like a machine gun,” the actor reminisces about the experience, making gun noises, during interviews in Wellington and his hometown, Rotorua, New Zealand. “Rattling off. Like Add.”

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- Alexander Bisley

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Nicolas Cage: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

6 May 2015 3:03 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

It was August, 2005. I knocked on the double door at the Four Seasons. It opened almost immediately. "Hi, I'm Nic," he said, hand outstretched. Nicolas Cage wasn't who I expected him to be. Like all actors, he was smaller and trimmer in person than he appeared on-screen. Neatly dressed in an Armani suit, Cage also displayed none of the manic fervor in real life as had become his signature on-screen. He was thoughtful, well-spoken and incredibly literate in all seven arts. It's an infrequent experience that you leave an interview feeling you've just met someone that you could hang out with regularly, but I got that with Nic Cage, in spades. He was endlessly fascinating, but also kind of a regular guy. Another of my favorite chats I count myself lucky to have been part of.

Nicolas Cage: Lord Of The Nerds


Alex Simon

It’s an inevitable »

- The Hollywood

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The top 25 underappreciated films of 1988

6 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our look at underappreciated films of the 80s continues, as we head back to 1988...

Either in terms of ticket sales or critical acclaim, 1988 was dominated by the likes of Rain Man, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Coming To America. It was the year Bruce Willis made the jump from TV to action star with Die Hard, and became a star in the process.

It was the year Leslie Nielsen made his own jump from the small to silver screen with Police Squad spin-off The Naked Gun, which sparked a hugely popular franchise of its own. Elsewhere, the eccentric Tim Burton scored one of the biggest hits of the year with Beetlejuice, the success of which would result in the birth of Batman a year later. And then there was Tom Cruise, who managed to make a drama about a student-turned-barman into a $170m hit, back when $170m was still an »

- ryanlambie

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Why 1999 was the best year in movie history

30 April 2015 8:40 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century? Check here for a complete list of our essays. The end of the 1990s was the end of an era on the big screen. The independent filmmaking movement that started the decade had taken full bloom and infiltrated the business. Major studios had begun to jump headlong into the "dependent" game, amping up prestige product and utilizing the awards season as a marketing tool. The blockbuster landscape at the summer multiplex had been interesting, full of original concepts (good and bad), but something else was on the way — a new overlord in the business of film, and one that would more or less make the age of the movie star (at least as we had come to know it) a thing of the past. For those reasons and a slew of others, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004

10 items from 2015, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

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