6.8/10
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2 user 3 critic

Lichter aus dem Hintergrund (1998)

Merely a few years after the fall of the Wall, Berlin is in a state of upheaval. Mammoth construction sites, particularly in the new government district between Bellevue and Tiergarten, ... See full summary »

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Merely a few years after the fall of the Wall, Berlin is in a state of upheaval. Mammoth construction sites, particularly in the new government district between Bellevue and Tiergarten, reveal the city's efforts to take on the architectural appearance of a modern new capital - a task that risks scarring the face of the old metropolis, forever wiping out the material presence of its history, marring the memory of it in the minds of its inhabitants. Helga Reidemeister documents these changes with a poetic eye for the complicated beauty of today's Berlin, while avoiding sentimental or conventional language. Music by world-renowned jazz trombonist Konrad Bauer contributes much to the haunting beauty of this work. The documentary focuses on the young photographer, Robert Paris, and the beliefs he shares with his friends and family. Representative of many people in East Berlin, the former capital of the German Democratic Republic, he, his friends, and family are irritated by the building ... Written by DEFA Film Library

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10 September 1998 (Germany)  »

Also Known As:

Lights from Afar  »

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1.85 : 1
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Visually impressive
18 February 2001 | by (Monterrey, Mexico) – See all my reviews

There's been a lot of German movies and documentaries made about the unification of West and East Germany, but I think this one is one of the most interesting ones I have seen. Following the life of a troubled photographer and some of his friends that are trying to adjust to this new capitalist system, he feels left behind and disappointed by the Western way of life and the changes made to his home city, Berlin. The city provides a great background against which these stories are told, and the photography in the film is really beautiful. Being a photographer myself I was moved in many ways by this documentary, and I believe that many people would enjoy it, even if they're not involved in photography. It's a very interesting work.


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