7.4/10
101,502
494 user 124 critic

Ghost World (2001)

With only the plan of moving in together after high school, two unusually devious friends seek direction in life. As a mere gag, they respond to a man's newspaper ad for a date, only to find it will greatly complicate their lives.

Director:

Writers:

(comic book), | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
2,979 ( 97)

Watch Now

From $3.99 (HD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 28 wins & 55 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Joe
...
...
...
...
...
Edit

Storyline

This is the story of Enid and Rebecca after they finish the high school. Both have problems relating to people and they spend their time hanging around and bothering creeps. When they meet Seymour who is a social outsider who loves to collect old 78 records, Enid's life will change forever. Written by eric from Mexico City

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Accentuate the negative. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language and some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

21 September 2001 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Prízracný svet  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$98,791 (USA) (22 July 2001)

Gross:

$6,217,849 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Daniel Clowes and Terry Zwigoff presented Affonso Beato with the task of making a comic book look to the movie. They asked for a fresh technique: earlier examples of the form such as X-Men (2000) and Dick Tracy (1990) were dismissed as literal-minded and "insulting" to the art form. According to Clowes, cameraman Beato "really took it to heart", carefully studying the style and color of the original comics. The final cut is just slightly oversaturated, purposefully redolent of "the way the modern world looks where everything is trying to get your attention at once." See more »

Goofs

When Dana tries to get Seymour to dance, he tells her that it's 10:00 and they need to leave if they're going to make it to the movie. In the next scene, the clock next to Enid's bed shows 9:30. See more »

Quotes

Rebecca: Oh! It's that comedian I was telling you about.
[she turns up the volume on her television, which is showing an odd-looking man performing stand-up comedy]
Rebecca: See this bit, it's the absolute worst.
Joey McCobb, the Stand Up Comic: [on the TV] Just because I still live with my mother people think I'm peculiar. So what if she's been dead for 15 years?
Rebecca: See? It's barely even a joke.
Joey McCobb, the Stand Up Comic: Well, it's like I always say, take my life... please!
[he bows and his audience applauds]
TV Announcer: Joey McCobb, the weee-irdest man in showbusiness!
Enid: If he's so weird...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

After all the credits roll, there's another take of the scene where Seymour (Steve Buscemi) gets attacked by Doug in the minimart. Only this time, Buscemi's characer easily wins the fight, choking Doug with his own weapon, and stomps out triumphantly. He finishes with a bunch of Mr. Pink type dialogue. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Film Geek (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

You're Just My Type
Written by Davidson Nelson and Joseph "King" Oliver
Performed by Vince Giordano and The Nighthawks
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Join the human race... or not.
25 June 2001 | by (Seattle, WA ~ USA) – See all my reviews

Best friends Enid and Rebecca graduate from high school and find themselves forced to enter the real world. Enid (more than Rebecca) is a counter-culture rebel who hates this world of frauds and losers, and she subsequently has trouble getting and keeping a job. One day the girls decide to play a prank on a lonely middle-aged loser named Seymour. Their plan backfires, though, and Enid becomes a little obsessed with the man. First she feels sorry for Seymour, then he becomes something of a hero to her, and she resolves to help him at least find a girlfriend. "Maybe I just can't stand the thought of a world where a guy like you can't get a date," she tells him. Meanwhile, Enid seems to be avoiding the challenge of getting her own life started.

Terry Zwigoff ("Crumb") directs this film based on a script by Dan Clowes, who also created the original comic book. "Ghost World" attempts to be a kitsch-free, counter-culture coming-of-age film, and for the most part it succeeds. The characters are very believable, honest, and engaging. The downbeat Seymour is played wonderfully by Steve Buscemi, and Thora Birch in her striking performance as Enid follows up her "American Beauty" role with another discontent but sympathetic misfit teen character. Perhaps the greatest disappointment in "Ghost World," however, is that Scarlett Johansson as Rebecca is marginalized midway through the film. Regarding the story: It is debatable whether the film is entirely free of kitsch. As with "American Beauty," the sudden romantic opportunities which fall into Seymour's lap smell suspiciously of middle-aged wish fulfillment. Also, one might ask for a slightly tighter ending, as the film finishes without much resolution--except for one rather simple but touching scene between Enid and Seymour. On the whole, however, the film is a delight, producing some very memorable characters to whom, in the end, the audience will be sorry to say goodbye.


93 of 118 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page