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What Farocki Taught (1998)

What Farocki Taught is a stubborn film, containing a perfect replica, shot-for-shot, in color and English, of Harun Farocki's 1969 b/w German film 'Inextinguishable Fire' - about the ... See full summary »

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3 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
J. Blanford
D. Burrell
J. Cavadini
M. DeAnda
Denise J. Massa ...
Mrs. Finch
E.-M. Sent
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Storyline

What Farocki Taught is a stubborn film, containing a perfect replica, shot-for-shot, in color and English, of Harun Farocki's 1969 b/w German film 'Inextinguishable Fire' - about the production of Napalm, the abuses of human labor, and filmmaking. The film radically questions the significance and conclusiveness of "found footage" or handed-down material by denying any historical distance to the political situation criticised by Farocki. Written by Kurzfilmtage - international short film festival Oberhausen

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Genres:

War | Short

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Release Date:

October 1998 (USA)  »

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Filmed at the University of Notre Dame. See more »

Connections

Remake of The Inextinguishable Fire (1969) See more »

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User Reviews

Why the flat voices work
1 December 2004 | by See all my reviews

This movie is a replica of a film made in 1969 on the problems created by excessive division of labor. It emphasizes the idea of the worker being separated from his or her final product and not knowing how the product is used for the creation of destructive weapons. The way the characters act reinforces this idea because they almost seem to be robots themselves acting out these parts. They are simply components of a system that produces weapons without their personal involvement towards the final outcome of their work. For this reason, the flat voices work as an indication of their machine-like existence and the inhumane element of their work.


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