A pop music dance show with an African-American focus.
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2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »
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Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

On this show, Dick Clark hosts a daily to weekly dance show that features the latest hit music for the attending teens to dance to. In addition, the show has performances by popular musicians and audience members rate songs.

Stars: Dick Clark, Charlie O'Donnell, Peaches Johnson
Good Times (1974–1979)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A poor Afro-American family make the best of things in the Chicago housing projects.

Stars: Ralph Carter, BernNadette Stanis, Jimmie Walker
Sanford and Son (1972–1977)
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

The misadventures of a cantankerous junk dealer and his frustrated son.

Stars: Redd Foxx, Demond Wilson, LaWanda Page
Family Feud (TV Series 1999)
Comedy | Game-Show
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Hosted by Steve Harvey, two families battle it out by answering survey questions for a chance to win $20,000 and, after 5 wins, a new car.

Stars: Steve Harvey, Rubin Ervin, Burton Richardson
Charlie's Angels (1976–1981)
Action | Adventure | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

The adventures of three sexy female private eyes.

Stars: Kate Jackson, Farrah Fawcett, Jaclyn Smith
8 Simple Rules (2002–2005)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

The Hennessy clan -- mother Cate, daughters Bridget and Kerry, and son Rory -- look to one another for guidance and support after the death of Paul, the family patriarch. Cate's parents lend a hand.

Stars: Katey Sagal, Kaley Cuoco, Amy Davidson
Miami Vice (1984–1990)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Resplendent with authentic 1980's music, fashion and vibe, "Miami Vice" follows two undercover detectives and their extended team through the mean streets of Miami.

Stars: Don Johnson, Philip Michael Thomas, Saundra Santiago
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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Himself - Host (555 episodes, 1971-1993)
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Storyline

Since 1971, "Soul Train" has been the "American Bandstand" of the African-American community. Even today, "Soul Train" continues to be the showcase of urban artists and their chart-topping singles. The program also continues to be the place for beautiful dancers and their dance moves, though the dance and the dancers' attire are a bit more risque due to the changing times. Written by Tim Traylor <Sundown305@yahoo.com>

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Genres:

Music | Talk-Show

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2 October 1971 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The series began as a local daily dance program on WCIU-TV (Channel 26) in Chicago on 17 August 1970, with Jerry Butler, The Chi-Lites and The Emotions as guests on the premiere edition. The success of the local version led to the start of the nationally-syndicated version on 2 October 1971; however, the local version continued to run (with Don Cornelius passing hosting duties of that version on to one of its dancers, Clinton Ghent), with original episodes being produced through 1976, and repeats airing until 1979. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: The Best of Chris Rock (1999) See more »

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User Reviews

Put it out of its misery
5 July 2004 | by (Boston, MA) – See all my reviews

It's a shame that the Soul Train of yesteryear is gone. But that is no reason to desperately keep the current show that bears its name on the air.

With every lipsynched performance, this show grows more pitiful.

With every painfully easy Scramble Board (what could ARMY J LBGEI possibly spell?!), the intelligence of all parties involved is insulted. With every phony host who conducts a even phonier interview, I feel more and more like I'm watching an infomercial.

That show is a mere husk of what it once was. It has no cultural significance whatsoever and should be laid to rest in order to preserve the integrity of its namesake, the REAL "Soul Train" - the one with REAL singers, REAL dancers, and true artistic merit.


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