Impostor (2001) - News Poster

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The Danny Boyle sci-fi short film we never got to see

Ryan Lambie Jan 31, 2017

Shot well over 18 years ago, Danny Boyle's sci-fi short film Alien Love Triangle has never been released - despite a starry cast...

In the late 90s, two very different filmmakers were still in the (relatively) early stages of their careers. Mexican director Guillermo del Toro had released his first feature, Cronos (1993) to widespread acclaim. The UK's Danny Boyle had captured the zeitgeist with his second movie, Trainspotting, and was about to embark on his next film, A Life Less Ordinary (1997).

See related A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune The fall and rise of Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune Looking back at David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

Had everything gone to plan, del Toro and Boyle could have wound up directing their own chapters of a three-part anthology movie - the sci-fi equivalent of, say, Amicus Productions' portmanteau horror films of the 60s and 70s, such as The House That Dripped Blood
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Jumanji' Remake on Target for Christmas 2016 Release

  • MovieWeb
'Jumanji' Remake on Target for Christmas 2016 Release
Back in August, Sony Pictures issued release dates for a number of high-profile projects, all set to hit theaters between 2016 and 2017. One of those movies is their Jumanji remake, which has been in development for several years, with Zach Helm coming aboard to write the script back in 2012. Today, Deadline reports that the studio has hired screenwriter Scott Rosenberg (Con Air) to rewrite the script in hopes that it makes its announced holiday release next year.

The remake is said to be a high priority for the studio, described as a "re-imagination" of the original 1995 blockbuster Jumanji, which starred Robin Williams, Kirsten Dunst, Bonnie Hunt and Bebe Neuwirth. The original movie was spawned from the board game and book by writer Chris Van Allsburg (The Polar Express, Zathura). The movie earned a whopping $262.7 million worldwide at the box office, from a $65 million production budget.

Jumanji will hit theaters on Christmas
See full article at MovieWeb »

The top 30 underrated films of 2002

  • Den of Geek
Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 12 Dec 2013 - 05:49

The year of Baggins, Potter and Spider-Man also had a wealth of lesser-known movies. Here’s our pick of 2002's underappreciated films...

At the top of the box office tree, 2002 was dominated by fantasy and special effects. Peter Jackson's The Lord Of The Rings: The Two Towers made almost a billion dollars all by itself, with Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets taking second place and Sam Raimi's Spider-Man not too far behind.

In many ways, 2002 set the tempo for the Hollywood blockbuster landscape, which has changed relatively little in the decade since. A quick look at 2013‘s top 10, for example, reveals a markedly similar mix of superhero movies, with Iron Man 3 still ruling the roost at the time of writing, followed by effects-heavy action flicks and family-friendly animated features.

As usual in these lists, we're looking
See full article at Den of Geek »

U.S. Senator to FBI -- An Impostor Sold D.C. Internship to 'Girls Gone Wild'

  • TMZ
U.S. Senator Mark Pryor is adamant ... he did Not agree to auction off the 4-week congressional internship allegedly purchased by Joe Francis ... and has told the FBI an Impostor is to blame. Here's the back story -- Francis sent out a press release Tuesday claiming he won an internship in a charity auction ... and plans to gift the internship to the winner of his HDNet reality series, "The Search for the Hottest Girl in
See full article at TMZ »

Philip K. Dick – A History in Cinema

To mark the Blu-ray and DVD release of Matt Damon and Emily Blunt’s new thriller The Adjustment Bureau, on July 4th, we’ve taken a look at the films influenced by sci-fi writer Phillip K. Dick, whose short story Adjustment Team inspired this film. Dick, for those that don’t know, is a legendary cult short story writer and novelist whose imaginative and unique narratives have inspired numerous feature films and attracted some of Hollywood’s most prominent directors including Ridley Scott, Steven Spielberg and John Woo

The Adjustment Bureau

David Norris (Matt Damon) is a young charismatic politician who is destined for greatness but when he has a chance encounter with dancer Elise Sellas (Emily Blunt) he instantly falls for her and veers off his pre-determined path. The adjustment team must step in to make a “correction“ and put David back on a course that will mean he
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Can ‘The Adjustment Bureau’ Save Your Life?

Can ‘The Adjustment Bureau’ Save Your Life?
Universal A scene from “The Adjustment Bureau.”

Philip K. Dick is certainly among the most clearly philosophical of all science-fiction writers, but his convoluted metaphysics, troubling ambiguity, and existential paranoia seem inevitably to get transmuted by the camera’s lens into guns, chases, and dashing leading men. So be it: the movies based on his writing still have enough of his philosophical explorations to be thought-provoking and enough of his uncertainty and dread to put some depth beneath the Hollywood veneer.
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »

Looking back at the 9 movie adaptations of Philip K Dick

With The Adjustment Bureau about to arrive in cinemas, we take a look at Philip K Dick’s other adapted work, and those yet to come…

Paranoid, mind-bending, unpredictable and surreal, the writings of Philip K Dick may have been keyed in to the counterculture, trippy era of the 60s and 70s, but decades after his untimely death in 1982, his best stories seem more relevant now than ever before. This perhaps explains why the author's books and novels are so often a source of inspiration to filmmakers and other writers, in spite of their frequently bewildering nature.

Movies based on Philip K Dick's work have regularly appeared on the big screen since Ridley Scott brought Blade Runner to the screen in 1982, and more adaptations have been announced for the future. Dick passed away before Blade Runner's premiere, and never had the opportunity to enjoy the huge following his work has gradually acquired,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Every Philip K. Dick movie ranked and rated

It's no secret that Philip K. Dick is my favourite American writer. I've said it here many times before. I think the themes he tackled time and time again have had a profound influence on what we know as modern science fiction today. So, with the latest Dick adaptation, Adjustment Bureau, premiering this Friday, March 4, and Ubik announced to finally have a director, I thought I'd take a look back at all the films that have been adapted from his massive repertoire of short stories and novels over the years and see how they all stack up.

I've put the films in order of my own personal preference. Obviously many of you will probably disagree with my order, but I think because I tend to enjoy Dick's earlier writing which tends to lean towards high concept, fast paced scifi weirdness I tend to go for the more hard scifi,
See full article at QuietEarth »

Far From Ordinary: A Danny Boyle Profile (Part 1)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of Academy Award-winning British director Danny Boyle in the first of a two-part feature...

“I come from a very ordinary, working class family in Manchester,” explained British filmmaker Danny Boyle. “It was a very strict Catholic family. I was an altar boy for eight years. I am supposed to be a priest; it was my mother’s fondest wish that I would become one.” The religious aspirations of the teenager were called into question by a man of the cloth. “I was going to transfer to a seminary near Wigan, but this priest, Father Conway, took me aside and said, ‘I don’t think you should go.’ Whether he was saving me from the priesthood or the priesthood from me, I don’t know. But quite soon after, I started to do drama. And there’s a real connection. All these directors – Martin Scorsese [The Departed], John Woo
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Notable Films of 2011: Part One

  • Dark Horizons
Back for its third year (see the 2010 edition) and bigger than ever, today kicks off the first in a fifteen-part look at the various cinematic releases hitting the U.S. in 2011. Each 'part' contains brief descriptions and editorial opinion/analysis of varying length covering twenty films. Expect the remaining ones to go up between now and the first major releases in mid-January.

Like all cinematic lists set within a timeframe, there's some overlap. Some films here have already opened worldwide but have yet to hit the U.S., some upcoming films you'd expect to be here aren't because they're either still in development or have already announced 2012 release dates, some were on last year's list but got delayed so have been included again (but with all new analysis).

I confined my list to films that have either set 2011 release dates or had begun/completed production, and only films that have
See full article at Dark Horizons »

The Notable Films of 2011: Part One

  • Dark Horizons
Back for its third year (see the 2010 edition) and bigger than ever, today kicks off the first in a fifteen-part look at the various cinematic releases hitting the U.S. in 2011. Each 'part' contains brief descriptions and editorial opinion/analysis of varying length covering twenty films. Expect the remaining ones to go up between now and the first major releases in mid-January.

Like all cinematic lists set within a timeframe, there's some overlap. Some films here have already opened worldwide but have yet to hit the U.S., some upcoming films you'd expect to be here aren't because they're either still in development or have already announced 2012 release dates, some were on last year's list but got delayed so have been included again (but with all new analysis).

I confined my list to films that have either set 2011 release dates or had begun/completed production, and only films that have
See full article at Dark Horizons »

The Notable Films of 2010: Part One

  • Dark Horizons
After such success with this last year, today comes the first in a multi-chapter look at the various cinematic releases hitting the U.S. in 2010.

Each 'Volume' contains brief descriptions and editorial opinion/analysis of around 25-30 films, and at present it's looking to run around nine volumes in length.

Expect the remaining ones to go up between now and the first official weekend of releases on January 8th.

13

Opens: 2010

Cast: Jason Statham, Alexander Skarsgard, Mickey Rourke, Ray Winstone, 50 Cent

Director: Géla Babluani

Summary: A remake of 2005 French thriller "13 (Tzameti)". A naive young man assumes a dead man's identity and finds himself embroiled in an underground world of power, violence, and chance where men gamble behind closed doors on the lives of other men.

Analysis: Remakes are very common, the same director remaking his own film in English is rarer but still not unheard of ("Funny Games," "Bangkok Dangerous," "The
See full article at Dark Horizons »

The Notable Films of 2010: Part One

  • Dark Horizons
After such success with this last year, today comes the first in a multi-chapter look at the various cinematic releases hitting the U.S. in 2010.

Each 'Volume' contains brief descriptions and editorial opinion/analysis of around 25-30 films, and at present it's looking to run around nine volumes in length.

Expect the remaining ones to go up between now and the first official weekend of releases on January 8th.

13

Opens: 2010

Cast: Jason Statham, Alexander Skarsgard, Mickey Rourke, Ray Winstone, 50 Cent

Director: Géla Babluani

Summary: A remake of 2005 French thriller "13 (Tzameti)". A naive young man assumes a dead man's identity and finds himself embroiled in an underground world of power, violence, and chance where men gamble behind closed doors on the lives of other men.

Analysis: Remakes are very common, the same director remaking his own film in English is rarer but still not unheard of ("Funny Games," "Bangkok Dangerous," "The
See full article at Dark Horizons »

The Notable Films of 2010: Part One

  • Dark Horizons
After such success with this last year, today comes the first in a multi-chapter look at the various cinematic releases hitting the U.S. in 2010.

Each 'Volume' contains brief descriptions and editorial opinion/analysis of around 25-30 films, and at present it's looking to run around nine volumes in length.

Expect the remaining ones to go up between now and the first official weekend of releases on January 8th.

13

Opens: 2010

Cast: Jason Statham, Alexander Skarsgard, Mickey Rourke, Ray Winstone, 50 Cent

Director: Géla Babluani

Summary: A remake of 2005 French thriller "13 (Tzameti)". A naive young man assumes a dead man's identity and finds himself embroiled in an underground world of power, violence, and chance where men gamble behind closed doors on the lives of other men.

Analysis: Remakes are very common, the same director remaking his own film in English is rarer but still not unheard of ("Funny Games," "Bangkok Dangerous," "The
See full article at Dark Horizons »

[DVD Review] Paycheck

Philip K. Dick has an impressive legacy in both science-fiction literature and film. To this day Blade Runner receives mention as one the best sci-fi films of all time, and then when you account for Total Recall and Minority Report – the man is a sci-fi writing god. Unfortunately, the sum of a man’s success can’t be divined without taking into account some of his clunkers. And there do seem to be quite a few, though it’s no real fault of his own. Impostor, Next, Paycheck and A Scanner Darkly put Philip K. Dick on the map in ways less than flattering. Among those, Paycheck may be the most mixed in terms of quality. While Impostor and Next are just awful in every respect and A Scanner Darkly is trippy as hell, Paycheck took John Woo, a legendary action director, and combined his efforts with those of Dean Georgaris
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Softley turns 'Skeleton Key' for Uni

Softley turns 'Skeleton Key' for Uni
Universal Pictures has picked up the thriller spec script Skeleton Key from screenwriter Ehren Kruger, with helmer Iain Softley attached to direct. The deal was made late Friday evening, the same day DreamWorks Pictures released The Ring, a remake of a Japanese horror feature that Kruger adapted. The film went on to open in the top slot with a $15 million domestic gross. Although a deal for Softley is not yet in place, Skeleton would reunite him with Universal, for whom he directed last year's K-PAX. Skeleton is described as The Ring meets The Sixth Sense. It's about a caretaker working with an elderly couple in their New Orleans home, which happens to have mysterious goings-on. Daniel Bobker is producing the project. Universal executive vp Holly Bario is overseeing with production president Scott Stuber. Kruger, repped by Paradigm, has written such projects as Impostor, Reindeer Games Scream 3 and Arlington Road. Skeleton reunites him with Bobker as the latter is producing the The Brothers Grimm, in development at MGM, which Kruger wrote. Helmer Terry Gilliam is expected to come aboard that project later this week. U.K.-born Softley, repped by ICM, directed The Wings of the Dove, Hackers and Backbeat.

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