IMDb > Guinevere (1999) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
Guinevere
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
Guinevere More at IMDbPro »

Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 6 of 7: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [Next]
Index 61 reviews in total 

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

A plaintive love it or hate it relationship flick.

6/10
Author: George Parker from Orange County, CA USA
26 November 2001

"Guinevere" tells of a young woman (Polley) who leaves her stuffy family to move in with a middle aged photo-artist (Rea) living a bohemian lifestyle and ends up sadder but wiser. A technically and artistically good film, "Guinevere" is a coming-of-age flick tinged with more pathos that giddiness which plumbs the depths of a relationship in which the woman becomes self actualized while the male is exposed as an unsuccessful, eccentric, and neurotic womanizer. Recommended for anyone, especially females, into films about unorthodox relationships.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Just not good

Author: jbelkin800 from northern cal
11 August 2001

Story has been done a thousand times on the Lifetime Channel alone. Script has absolutely nothing new to say on the subject.

Talk, talk, talk, talk, talk and talk some more - and then finally - finally - the movie ends.

The cast is fine but you can only do so much when you're assigned bland dialogue.

While Sarah Polley is a fine actress and does the best she can in this role - Here's a tip for budding filmmmakers - if you're casting your character to be upper-crust/upper income, it's distracting that you ask the actress to not smile or to hold her hand in front of her face because her teeth are not perfect - as her character's should be. Oh the other hand, it's probably the most interesting thing about this film - how Sarah's going to try and hid her teeth in a particular scene.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Precisely realized - a movie with heart

10/10
Author: cskoog from Ireland
25 March 2000

David Denby, a New Yorker film critic, maybe the best film critic I know, sent me to this film. It is wonderful in illuminating the strange mixtures we must accept in life in order to learn anything that is worth learning about being human. The film never flinches and is never distracted from this single-minded objective. The director gets performances from her leads that are awesome in their precision for that purpose.

If you liked 'Playing by Heart' or the older Peter Weir film 'Fearless' or Lasse Hallstrom's films or Angelika (sp?) Holland's films or John Sayle's films or 'Eve's Bayou' or even the somewhat more artificial 'American Beauty', there's a good chance you'll like this one. Like these, its art is in the service of showing the kind of learning that happens in those cases when people accept opportunities to realize their humanity.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

I loved this movie.

9/10
Author: wyaduck (wyaduck@aol.com) from L.A., CA
6 January 2000

One of my favorite movies of 1999...a pretty short list. A film like this could easily be botched up, but Wells handled her story and her direction so deftly. I absolutely believe these haracters and their relationship. In fact I've known these people and I've seen these relationships. (Another film that I loved which has some thematic similarities is Scorcese's section of "New York Stories" with Nick Nolte & Roseanna Arquette... but this is a totally original film.) Stephen Rea and Sarah Polley were perfectly cast and turn in subtle, touching performances. When Polley has the right role (see also "The Sweet Hereafter"... "Go" is more dismissable) she's brilliant. A lot of nice directorial touches and beautiful shots. The "math problem/seduction" scene was right on the money. Rea urging Polley to show a limb as he photographs her from behind a chair, her finally acquiescing with her leg... wonderful! I kept turning to my wife in the theater and asking, "Do you love this film as much as I do?" She did. The ending had us both choked up. It's a film for grown-ups and the pace takes its time (but it's never boring). This is not a film for the short-attention-span generation or people who go see those SNL spin-off movies. A very slight criticism... I thought some of the stuff with Polley's mother (Jean Smart) felt slightly over-dramatic. Also, I wasn't quite certain what exactly was taking place during the break-up scene. I want to watch it again on video to see what clues I missed. Favorite line from the film (if somewhat paraphrased): "Oh no. You're mistaking me for someoneone who has potential." We need more female directors with chops like those which Wells displays here. I hope she continues to make films close to her heart.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

I loved this movie.

9/10
Author: wyaduck (wyaduck@aol.com) from L.A., CA
6 January 2000

One of my favorite movies of 1999...a pretty short list. A film like this could easily be botched up, but Wells handled her story and her direction so deftly. I absolutely believe these characters and their relationship. In fact I've known these people and I've seen these relationships. (Another film that I loved which has some thematic similarities is Scorcese's section of "New York Stories" with Nick Nolte & Roseanna Arquette... but this is a totally original film.) Stephen Rea and Sarah Polley were perfectly cast and turn in subtle, touching performances. When Polley has the right role (see also "The Sweet Hereafter"... "Go" is more dismissable) she's brilliant. A lot of nice directorial touches and beautiful shots. The "math problem/seduction" scene was right on the money. Rea urging Polley to show a limb as he photographs her from behind a chair, her finally acquiescing with her leg... wonderful! I kept turning to my wife in the theater and asking, "Do you love this film as much as I do?" She did. The ending had us both choked up. It's a film for grown-ups and the pace takes its time (but it's never boring). This is not a film for the short-attention-span generation or people who go see those SNL spin-off movies. A very slight criticism... I thought some of the stuff with Polley's mother (Jean Smart) felt slightly over-dramatic. Also, I wasn't quite certain what exactly was taking place during the break-up scene. I want to watch it again on video to see what clues I missed. Favorite line from the film (if somewhat paraphrased): "Oh no. You're mistaking me for someoneone who has potential." We need more female directors with chops like those which Wells displays here. I hope she continues to make films close to her heart.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

The best film of 1999.

10/10
Author: banjo-5 (raab@mindspring.com) from Chicago, IL
19 October 1999

This film features the BEST film acting I think I've ever seen. >Beautifully directed, amazing film photography, and INCREDIBLE >lighting design. Just amazing. Nothing extraneous, each scene >totally succinct and beautiful. Shockingly good film. Really. I >never make comments like that about mov

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

You cannot be serious, Ms Wells

Author: William Murphy from Reading, United Kingdom
11 October 1999

After reading various enthusiastic reviews of Guinevere, I emerged from the cinema wondering if these critics and I had seen the same film. Are we expected to take the story or any of these characters seriously? Is it possible that any appealing young woman intelligent enough to earn a BA could be deceived by this crassly predatory con man? Stephen Rea plays an even less attractive version of the walking Irish cliche he portrayed in "Angie" - dark, rumpled good looks, smooth charm, gift of the gab, etc. However, in Guinevere his character has the extra ethnic disadvantage of roaring alcoholism and the tiresome habit of spouting pseudo-Marxist diatribes against the upper classes.

Admittedly, there is no accounting for taste, especially in sexual matters. Yet you hope that even someone as totally gullible and inexperienced as Harper Sloane (even her name is a crass cliche) might be offput by the explicit warnings from the earlier "Guinevere" played by Ileana Douglas....especially when her prophecies come true and Connie sends Harper out to earn the household income in a burger bar, while he stays at home, presumably in an artistic trance or an alcoholic stupor.

It is difficult to see what artistic tuition or inspiration Connie provides his "Guineveres" that they could not obtain more easily at the public library or evening classes. Sloan does not even take a photograph throughout her relationship with Connie, so it is difficult to see how her later career as a successful photographer owes anything to his mentorship. The one piece of career guidance he is seen to offer her is unbelievable. At a hospital, he leaves her alone in a room with one of his friends, who is even less attractive and more alcoholic than himself and is strapped down to a bed undergoing drastic detox treatment. He urges Sloane to document his incoherent pal's agony in photographs. Sloane does not get as far as taking pictures, because the drunk urinates all over her. Connie berates her for not taking photographs, declaring "This is hard....this is work!!" Well, no it isn't Connie; it is vile, degrading and humiliating and only a pathetic old Marxist lush like you (or a lousy screenwriter) could think otherwise.

Sloane's mum asks Connie what he has against women his own age. The answer is obvious, though not spoken in the film - any woman his own age would see through him in a maximum of three seconds. Also if she was sufficiently deranged to share a home with him, she would insist he do some honest work. Curiously, her mum looks more attractive and vibrantly sexual than the wan and compliant Sloane.

When Sloane first tries to leave, Connie says that both he and Sloane will know when it is the right time for her to leave. Eventually even Sloane's immature brain clicks into gear. When Connie is lying desperately ill in a crummy motel room and sends her across the road for a bottle of liquor, she disappears to get a life - and presumably a boyfriend who is not old enough to be her father.

With so many talented performers and technicians on show here, it is a great shame that they were not provided with a better screenplay. There may be good reasons for a young woman to associate with an older man, but this film provides only an unsavory and compelling argument for sticking to your own generation for sexual and intellectual companionship.

Was the above review useful to you?

2 out of 5 people found the following review useful:

The Most Beautiful Film I Have Ever Seen

10/10
Author: Crazychatmail-1 from Croatia
22 February 2006

Don't know really what to say about this movie ( except obvious :D ), so I'll just copy the plot line, to complete 10 lines :lol:

This is the most beautiful love story I have ever seen, this is the most beautiful movie I have ever seen. It's truly inspiring. The script is superb ( & very intellectual, deep, SHARP! ), direction almost flawless... it's really, really, really, GREAT. It's touching.... oh my Gosh... GREAT! Cast is perfect, & just music! It's discreet Christophe Beck Music ( I just think of Buffy's second season & Buffy & Angel Love Song... ). Really SUPERB movie...

& Here is the plot :D :

Young Harper Sloane meets part-time photographer Connor Fitzgerald. He succeed to impress her, & soon they start to hang out. He wants to motivate her for work ( books, art... ), & soon they begin an relationship/they fall in love...

Was the above review useful to you?

0 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Only for Polley Diehards.

Author: Jeope! from Winnipeg, Canada
21 December 1999

A strange little piece of work if there ever was one, this moody picture misses the mark. What originally may have been a huge boost in the career of Canadian prodigy Sarah Polley turns into a tedious venture into the fringes of Lolita-esque film sleaze. In fact, there is very little to root for here - no single character escapes with any real redeemable qualities, leaving some figuring that these people all deserve what they get. And watch out for Stephen Rea's impersonation of Mickey Rourke - I've never seen anyone mumble through their lines the way Mr. Rea did since, well, just about anything Rourke showed up in. Polley however, I am sure will end up on her feet as usual - she quite nearly pulls this mediocre pic out of the doldrums by herself. If anything, see it for her.

Was the above review useful to you?

0 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

whatever THAT meant

7/10
Author: sissypower from san diego
3 October 1999

Stephen Rea as the on-screen Weinstein surrogate?

Sarah Polley, the Gwennie stand-in?

Jean Smart swaggers into the Bohemian photographer's loft as Eileen Heckart might have done some twenty-seven years ago.

What's wrong with honest work?

Audrey Wells reminds us here in her directorial debut.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 6 of 7: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Ratings Awards
Newsgroup reviews External reviews Plot keywords
Main details Your user reviews Your vote history